Question:

What episode of 'Family Guy' does Stewie make a clone of himself?

Answer:

"Quagmire's Baby" is the sixth episode of the eighth season of the animated comedy series Family Guy. It it Stewie clones himself and later Brian.

More Info:

Family Guy is an American adult animated sitcom created by Seth MacFarlane for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series centers on the Griffins, a family consisting of parents Peter and Lois; their children Meg, Chris, and Stewie; and their anthropomorphic pet dog Brian. The show is set in the fictional city of Quahog, Rhode Island, and exhibits much of its humor in the form of cutaway gags that often lampoon American culture.

The family was conceived by MacFarlane after developing two animated films, The Life of Larry and Larry & Steve. MacFarlane redesigned the films' protagonist, Larry, and his dog, Steve, and renamed them Peter and Brian, respectively. MacFarlane pitched a seven-minute pilot to Fox on May 15, 1998. The show was given the green light and started production. Shortly after the third season of Family Guy aired in 2001, Fox cancelled the series, putting the series to a 2-year hiatus. However, favorable DVD sales and high ratings for syndicated reruns on Adult Swim convinced the network to renew the show in 2004 for a 4th season, which began airing on May 1, 2005.

Stewart Gilligan "Stewie" Griffin is a fictional character from the animated television series Family Guy. Once obsessed with violence and matricide, Stewie (voiced by Seth MacFarlane) is the youngest child of Peter and Lois Griffin, and the brother of Chris and Meg. He also has a close friendship with the family's anthropomorphic dog, Brian.

Stewie is considered to be the show's breakout character. magazineWizard rated him the 95th greatest villain of all time.

"Quagmire's Baby" is the sixth episode of the eighth season of the animated comedy series Family Guy. It originally aired on Fox in the United States on November 15, 2009. The episode centers around neighbor Glenn Quagmire, after he suddenly discovers that he is the illegitimate father of a newborn baby girl, when she is left at his doorstep. While he takes care of the baby, whom he names Anna Lee, Quagmire quickly becomes reluctant to give up his sex life, and must decide whether to keep her, or to give her up for adoption. Meanwhile, Griffin family baby Stewie Griffin decides to create a dumbed down clone of himself, in order to perform various tasks for him and serve as his slave. Intrigued, the family dog, Brian, also wants a clone, but soon both clones begin falling apart, and eventually end up melting.

The episode was written by series regular Patrick Meighan, and directed by Jerry Langford. It received positive reviews from critics for its storyline and many cultural references. According to Nielsen ratings, it was viewed in 8.28 million homes in its original airing. The episode featured guest performances by Luke Adams, John Bunnell, Max Burkholder, Noah Gray-Cabey, Christine Lakin, Brittany Snow, Mae Whitman, and Tom Wilson, along with several recurring guest voice actors for the series. "Quagmire's Baby" was released on DVD along with seven other episodes from the season on June 15, 2010.

Brian Griffin is a fictional character from the animated television series Family Guy. An anthropomorphic dog, voiced by Seth MacFarlane, he is one of the show's main characters and a member of the Griffin family.

He first appeared on television, along with the rest of the family, in a 15-minute short on December 20, 1998. Brian was created and designed by MacFarlane himself. MacFarlane was asked to pitch a pilot to the Fox Broadcasting Company based on The Life of Larry and Larry & Steve, two shorts made by MacFarlane (the second one at Hanna-Barbera for Cartoon Network's "What-A-Cartoon" project) which featured a middle-aged character named Larry and an intellectual dog, Steve. After the pilot was given the green light, the Griffin family appeared on the episode "Death Has a Shadow".

"Brian & Stewie" is the 17th episode of the eighth season of the American animated television series Family Guy, and 150th episode of the series overall. It aired on Fox in the United States on May 2, 2010. The episode features anthropomorphic dog Brian and baby Stewie after they are accidentally trapped inside a bank vault over a weekend. The two are ultimately forced to reveal their true feelings about each other, and eventually go on to question each other's existence and purpose in life. Brian and Stewie become even closer to each other as time goes on, and climactically help each other survive being trapped inside the cold, dark vault. The episode breaks from the show's usual set-up, and is the only episode of the series not to use any cutaway gags.

The episode was written by Gary Janetti and directed by Dominic Bianchi. It received mostly positive reviews from critics for its serious dialogue, but poor reviews for its gross-out humor, in addition to receiving criticism from the Parents Television Council. According to Nielsen ratings, it was viewed in 7.68 million homes in its original airing. The episode aired along with a series of musical numbers from throughout the show's eight seasons. "Brian & Stewie" was released on DVD along with ten other episodes from the season on December 13, 2011.

Book:Family Guy

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

Television

Family Guy is an American adult animated sitcom created by Seth MacFarlane for the Fox Broadcasting Company. The series centers on the Griffins, a family consisting of parents Peter and Lois; their children Meg, Chris, and Stewie; and their anthropomorphic pet dog Brian. The show is set in the fictional city of Quahog, Rhode Island, and exhibits much of its humor in the form of cutaway gags that often lampoon American culture.

The family was conceived by MacFarlane after developing two animated films, The Life of Larry and Larry & Steve. MacFarlane redesigned the films' protagonist, Larry, and his dog, Steve, and renamed them Peter and Brian, respectively. MacFarlane pitched a seven-minute pilot to Fox on May 15, 1998. The show was given the green light and started production. Shortly after the third season of Family Guy aired in 2001, Fox cancelled the series, putting the series to a 2-year hiatus. However, favorable DVD sales and high ratings for syndicated reruns on Adult Swim convinced the network to renew the show in 2004 for a 4th season, which began airing on May 1, 2005.

Film Entertainment Culture Entertainment Culture
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
17