Question:

What does vais mean in french?

Answer:

In French, the word 'vais' means 'go'. Anything else AnswerParty can do for you?

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Don't Worry, I'm Fine (French: Je vais bien, ne t'en fais pas) is a 2006 French drama film directed by Philippe Lioret based on the 2000 novel with the same title by Olivier Adam.

Lili, a 19 year old, returns from holidays and learns that her twin brother Loïc has left the house after a violent argument with their father. Lili had a very strong relationship with her brother and is distraught after having no contact with him at all, concluding that something happened to him.

There are over 2100 and by some counts over 3000 languages spoken natively in Africa in several major language families:

There are several other small families and language isolates, as well as obscure languages that have yet to be classified. In addition, Africa has a wide variety of sign languages, many of which are language isolates.

A multitude of languages are used in Canada. According to the 2011 census, English and French are the mother tongues of 56.9% and 21.3% of Canadians respectively. However, marking the steady decline in use of the French language by Canadians and new immigrants, the same census paints a gloomier picture of the survival of French as a second language for the country. Over 85% of Canadians have working knowledge of English while only 30.1% have a working knowledge of French. This is partly due to many French-speaking Canadians learning English and to more immigrants choosing to learn English as their second language rather than French. The steady decline in use of the French language led to the highly controversial Official Languages Act of 1969. The act was introduced to enforce use of the French language in an effort to preserve the culture of French Canadians who played a significant role in Canadian heritage. Under the Canadian Constitution, the federal government has both English and French as its official languages in respect of all government services, including the courts, and all federal legislation is enacted bilingually. New Brunswick is the only Canadian province that has both English and French as its official languages to the same extent, with constitutional entrenchment. Quebec's official language is French, although in that province, the Constitution requires that all legislation be enacted in both French and English, and court proceedings may be conducted in either language. Similar constitutional protections are in place in Manitoba.

Many Canadians believe that the relationship between the English and French languages is the central or defining aspect of the Canadian experience. Canada's Official Languages Commissioner (the federal government official charged with monitoring the two languages) has stated, "[I]n the same way that race is at the core of what it means to be American and at the core of an American experience and class is at the core of British experience, I think that language is at the core of Canadian experience."

Phonological history

French (le français [lə fʁ̥ɒ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language spoken as a first language in France, the Romandy region in Switzerland, Wallonia and Brussels in Belgium, Monaco, the provinces of Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick (Acadia region) in Canada, the Acadiana region of the U.S. state of Louisiana, the northern parts of the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont in the New England region, and by various communities elsewhere. Other speakers of French, who often speak it as a second language, are distributed throughout many parts of the world, the largest numbers of whom reside in Francophone Africa. In Africa, French is most commonly spoken in Gabon (where 80% report fluency), Mauritius (78%), Algeria (75%), Senegal and Côte d'Ivoire (70%). French is estimated as having 110 million native speakers and 190 million more second language speakers.

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