Question:

What disease does Steven Hawkins have?

Answer:

Professor Stephen Hawkins suffers from Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) a.k.a Lou Gehrig's Disease. AnswerParty for now!

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Professor
Lou Gehrig

Henry Louis "Lou" or "Buster" Gehrig (June 19, 1903 – June 2, 1941) was a German-American baseball first baseman who played 17 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the New York Yankees (1923–1939). Gehrig was renowned for his prowess as a hitter and for his durability, a trait which earned him his nickname "The Iron Horse". He finished with a career batting average of .340, an on-base percentage of .447, and a slugging percentage of .632, and he tallied 1,995 runs batted in (RBIs). A seven-time All-Star and six-time World Series champion, Gehrig won the Triple Crown in 1934 and was twice named the American League's (AL) Most Valuable Player. Gehrig was the first MLB player to have his uniform number retired, and he was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1939.

A native of New York City and attendee of Columbia University, Gehrig signed with the Yankees in 1923. He set several major league records during his career, including the most career grand slams (23), a record that stood for 75 years before Alex Rodriguez broke it in 2013, and most consecutive games played (2,130), a record that stood for 56 years and was long considered unbreakable until surpassed by Cal Ripken, Jr. in 1995. Gehrig's streak ended in 1939 after he was stricken with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a disorder now commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease in North America, which forced him to retire at age 36 and claimed his life two years later. The pathos of his farewell from baseball was capped off by his iconic "Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth" speech at the original Yankee Stadium.


Stephen Hawkins

Stephen Mark Hawkins OAM (born 14 January 1971) is an Australian rower. He won a gold medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics.


Stephen William Hawking CH CBE FRS FRSA (Listeni/ˈstvən ˈhɔːkɪŋ/ STEE-vən HAW-king; born 8 January 1942) is an English theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and Director of Research at the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology within the University of Cambridge. Among his significant scientific works have been a collaboration with Roger Penrose on gravitational singularities theorems in the framework of general relativity, and the theoretical prediction that black holes emit radiation, often called Hawking radiation. Hawking was the first to set forth a cosmology explained by a union of the general theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He is a vocal supporter of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics.

He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a lifetime member of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian award in the United States. Hawking was the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1979 and 2009.

disease lateral sclerosis a.k.a Lou Gehrig's Disease
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – also referred to as motor neurone disease (MND) in most Commonwealth countries, and as Lou Gehrig's disease in the United States – is a debilitating disease with varied etiology characterized by rapidly progressive weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations, muscle spasticity, difficulty speaking (dysarthria), difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), and difficulty breathing (dyspnea). ALS is the most common of the five motor neuron diseases.

Sclerosis

Lawrence R. "Larry" Stowe is an unlicensed medical practitioner. Until April 2010, Stowe operated Stowe Biotherapy in La Mesa, California. Stowe offered "biotherapy" based on stem cells, promising to heal amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's Disease) and multiple sclerosis sufferers, enabling the ability to walk.

Stowe has a doctorate in chemical engineering and previously was employed at Mobil Oil. He holds patents in the oil industry.


Craig Cline

Craig Cline (1951–2006) worked at Atex and then served as conference director of Seybold Seminars and vice president of content development for the Seminars, as well as editorial director of Seybold Publications, holding the latter two titles since November 1996.

He began with Seybold in the mid 1980s when the Seminars were the major conference for the growing electronic publishing industry and helped make them into "milestones for designers, developers, and production folks of all stripes in their struggle to understand what is going on with the technology."

Health
Motor neurone disease

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) – also referred to as motor neurone disease (MND) in most Commonwealth countries, and as Lou Gehrig's disease in the United States – is a debilitating disease with varied etiology characterized by rapidly progressive weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations, muscle spasticity, difficulty speaking (dysarthria), difficulty swallowing (dysphagia), and difficulty breathing (dyspnea). ALS is the most common of the five motor neuron diseases.


Rare diseases

A rare disease, also referred to as an orphan disease, is any disease that affects a small percentage of the population.

Most rare diseases are genetic, and thus are present throughout the person's entire life, even if symptoms do not immediately appear. Many rare diseases appear early in life, and about 30 percent of children with rare diseases will die before reaching their fifth birthday. With a single diagnosed patient only, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase deficiency is presently considered the rarest genetic disease.

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