Question:

What did the J in Michael J Fox stand for?

Answer:

Michael J Fox was born Michael Andrew Fox, he adoptedthe J as an homage to character actor Michael J. Pollard. AnswerParty!

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Michael J. Fox, OC (born Michael Andrew Fox; June 9, 1961) is a Canadian American actor, author, producer, activist and voice-over artist. With a film and television career spanning from the late 1970s, Fox's roles have included Marty McFly from the trilogyBack to the Future (1985–1990); Alex P. Keaton from Family Ties (1982–1989) for which he won three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; Mike Flaherty from Spin City (1996–2000), for which he won an Emmy, three Golden Globes, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards; and Private Max Eriksson in the Brian De Palma film Casualties of War.

Fox's middle initial "J" does not stand for anything. His birth name is Michael Andrew Fox but when he registered for the Screen Actors Guild, the name "Michael Fox" was already taken. Fox said he did not want to register "Michael A. Fox" because it presented a play on words, and that he was paying homage to actor Michael J. Pollard.

Michael J. Fox, OC (born Michael Andrew Fox; June 9, 1961) is a Canadian American actor, author, producer, activist and voice-over artist. With a film and television career spanning from the late 1970s, Fox's roles have included Marty McFly from the trilogyBack to the Future (1985–1990); Alex P. Keaton from Family Ties (1982–1989) for which he won three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; Mike Flaherty from Spin City (1996–2000), for which he won an Emmy, three Golden Globes, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards; and Private Max Eriksson in the Brian De Palma film Casualties of War.

Fox's middle initial "J" does not stand for anything. His birth name is Michael Andrew Fox but when he registered for the Screen Actors Guild, the name "Michael Fox" was already taken. Fox said he did not want to register "Michael A. Fox" because it presented a play on words, and that he was paying homage to actor Michael J. Pollard.

Fox

Michael John Pollard (born Michael John Pollack, Jr., May 30, 1939) is an American actor best known for playing the character C.W. Moss in 1967 crime film Bonnie and Clyde.

Pollard

Michael J. Fox, OC (born Michael Andrew Fox; June 9, 1961) is a Canadian American actor, author, producer, activist and voice-over artist. With a film and television career spanning from the late 1970s, Fox's roles have included Marty McFly from the trilogyBack to the Future (1985–1990); Alex P. Keaton from Family Ties (1982–1989) for which he won three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; Mike Flaherty from Spin City (1996–2000), for which he won an Emmy, three Golden Globes, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards; and Private Max Eriksson in the Brian De Palma film Casualties of War.

Fox's middle initial "J" does not stand for anything. His birth name is Michael Andrew Fox but when he registered for the Screen Actors Guild, the name "Michael Fox" was already taken. Fox said he did not want to register "Michael A. Fox" because it presented a play on words, and that he was paying homage to actor Michael J. Pollard.

Michael Dawson Nationality

The cinema of the United States, often generally referred to as Hollywood, has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. Its history is sometimes separated into four main periods: the silent film era, classical Hollywood cinema, New Hollywood, and the contemporary period. While the French Lumière Brothers are generally credited with the birth of modern cinema, it is indisputably American cinema that soon became the most dominant force in an emerging industry. Since the 1920s, the American film industry has grossed more money every year than that of any other country.

In 1878, Eadweard Muybridge demonstrated the power of photography to capture motion. In 1894, the world's first commercial motion picture exhibition was given in New York City, using Thomas Edison's Kinetoscope. The United States was in the forefront of sound film development in the following decades. Since the early 20th century, the U.S. film industry has largely been based in and around Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. Picture City, FL was also a planned site for a movie picture production center in the 1920s, but due to the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane, the idea collapsed and Picture City returned to its original name of Hobe Sound. Director D. W. Griffith was central to the development of film grammar. Orson Welles's Citizen Kane (1941) is frequently cited in critics' polls as the greatest film of all time.

The cinema of Canada or Canadian cinema refers to the filmmaking industry in Canada. Canada is home to several film studios centres, primarily located in its three largest metropolitan centres: Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. Industries and communities tend to be regional and niche in nature. Approximately 1,000 Anglophone-Canadian and 600 Francophone-Canadian feature-length films have been produced, or partially produced, by the Canadian film industry since 1911.

Notable filmmakers from English Canada include David Cronenberg, Guy Maddin, Atom Egoyan, Allan King, and Michael Snow. Notable filmmakers from French Canada include Claude Jutra, Gilles Carle, Denys Arcand, Jean Beaudin, Robert Lepage, Denis Villeneuve and Michel Brault.

Michael Fox may refer to:

Jonathan Jay Pollard (born August 7, 1954) is an American criminal convicted of passing classified information to Israel while working as a civilian intelligence analyst. He pleaded guilty and received a life sentence in 1987. Because his crime occurred prior to November 1, 1987, he is eligible for parole, and may be released on November 21, 2015.

Israel granted Pollard citizenship in 1995, but denied until 1998 that it had bought classified information from him. Israeli activist groups, as well as high-profile Israeli politicians, have lobbied for his release. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has voiced particularly strong support for Pollard, visiting the convicted spy in prison in 2002 while not in office. His case was later linked to that of Ben-ami Kadish, another U.S. citizen who pleaded guilty to charges of passing classified information to Israel in the same period.

Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention. Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens. The process has been accelerated in modern times by an entertainment industry which records and sells entertainment products. Entertainment evolves and can be adapted to suit any scale, ranging from an individual who chooses a private entertainment from a now enormous array of pre-recorded products; to a banquet adapted for two; to any size or type of party, with appropriate music and dance; to performances intended for thousands; and even for a global audience.

The experience of being entertained has come to be strongly associated with amusement, so that one common understanding of the idea is fun and laughter, although many entertainments have a serious purpose. This may be the case in the various forms of ceremony, celebration, religious festival, or satire for example. Hence, there is the possibility that what appears as entertainment may also be a means of achieving insight or intellectual growth.

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

A character actor is an actor who predominantly plays unusual or eccentric characters. Some character actors have distinctive voices or accents which limit their roles, while others have developed careers because of specific talents that are required in genre films, such as dancing, horsemanship or swimming ability.

The earliest known use of the term character actor is from the 9 November 1883 edition of The Stage, which defined it as "one who portrays individualities and eccentricities, as opposed to the legitimate actor who [...] endeavours to create the rôle as limned by the author".

Michael J. Fox, OC (born Michael Andrew Fox; June 9, 1961) is a Canadian American actor, author, producer, activist and voice-over artist. With a film and television career spanning from the late 1970s, Fox's roles have included Marty McFly from the trilogyBack to the Future (1985–1990); Alex P. Keaton from Family Ties (1982–1989) for which he won three Emmy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; Mike Flaherty from Spin City (1996–2000), for which he won an Emmy, three Golden Globes, and two Screen Actors Guild Awards; and Private Max Eriksson in the Brian De Palma film Casualties of War.

Fox's middle initial "J" does not stand for anything. His birth name is Michael Andrew Fox but when he registered for the Screen Actors Guild, the name "Michael Fox" was already taken. Fox said he did not want to register "Michael A. Fox" because it presented a play on words, and that he was paying homage to actor Michael J. Pollard.

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