Question:

What are the movies that are playing at Real To Reel for $3?

Answer:

Real to Reel, Johnston City, TN for $3 movies are Charlie St. Cloud, Grown Ups, Shrek Forever After, The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, Despicable Me, Salt, and The Sorcerer's Apprentice. Thanks!

More Info:

The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a 2010 fantasy adventure film produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, directed by Jon Turteltaub, and distributed by Walt Disney Pictures, the team behind the franchiseNational Treasure. The film is named after the The Sorcerer's Apprentice segment in Disney's Fantasia (with one scene being an extensive reference to it), which in turn is based on the late 1890s symphonic poem by Paul Dukas and the 1797 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe ballad. Balthazar Blake (Nicolas Cage), a "Merlinean", is a sorcerer in modern-day Manhattan, fighting against the forces of evil, in particular his arch-nemesis, Maxim Horvath (Alfred Molina), while searching for the person who will inherit Merlin's powers. This turns out to be Dave Stutler (Jay Baruchel), a physics student, whom Balthazar takes as a reluctant protégé. The sorcerer gives his unwilling apprentice a crash course in the art of science, magic, and sorcery, in order to stop Horvath and Morgana le Fay (Alice Krige) from raising the souls of the evil dead sorcerers ("Morganians") and destroying the world. In AD 740, the mighty magician Merlin (James A. Stephens) has three apprentices. One, Maxim Horvath (Alfred Molina), betrays his master by joining forces with the evil sorceress Morgana le Fay (Alice Krige). Morgana mortally wounds Merlin before another apprentice, Veronica Gorloisen (Monica Bellucci), absorbs Morgana, body and soul, into her own body. As Morgana tries to kill Veronica by possessing her from within, the third and final apprentice, Balthazar Blake (Nicolas Cage), stops her by imprisoning Morgana and Veronica in the "Grimhold", a magic prison in the shape of a nesting doll. Before dying, Merlin gives Balthazar a dragon ring that will identify the Prime Merlinean, Merlin's successor and the only one able to defeat Morgana. While he searches for his successor throughout history, Balthazar imprisons Morganians, sorcerers who try to release Morgana, including Horvath, into successive layers on the Grimhold. In 2000, 10-year-old Dave Stutler (Jake Cherry), encounters Balthazar in a Manhattan antique store. When Balthazar gives Dave Merlin's dragon ring, the ring comes to life, and wraps itself around the boy's finger. When Balthazar goes to find the book of magic, Dave accidentally opens the Grimhold, releasing Horvath. While battling for possession of the Grimhold, Balthazar and Horvath are imprisoned in an ancient Chinese urn with a ten-year lock curse. Dave is humiliated when his teacher and classmates find his pants wet from a vase that broke in his lap. The store has no trace of the sorcerers' battle, so the class believe Dave is pretending, and the boy suffers years of psychiatric treatment. Ten years later in 2010, Dave (Jay Baruchel), now 20, is a physics student at New York University, and meets his childhood crush Becky (Teresa Palmer). The ten-year imprisonment curse of the urn ends, releasing Horvath and Balthazar. Horvath pursues Dave and the Grimhold. Balthazar rescues Dave, riding an animated steel eagle created from a Chrysler Building gargoyle. Dave initially refuses to help Balthazar, having been under psychiatric care since their first meeting, until the elder agrees to leave after finding the Grimhold. They track the Grimhold to Chinatown, where Horvath has released the next Morganian, Sun Lok (Gregory Woo). Dave defeats Sun Lok, and Balthazar retrieves the Grimhold. Dave changes his mind, likes magic after all, and agrees to become Balthazar's apprentice. He also becomes romantically involved with Becky against Balthazar's wishes and advice. Horvath enlists celebrity magician Drake Stone (Toby Kebbell) to get back the Grimhold. They attempt to kill Dave, but Balthazar saves him. Cued by Horvath, Dave demands to know the truth about Balthazar's quest. Balthazar reveals that Morgana is trapped in the Grimhold with Veronica. Morgana, free, would cast "The Rising" spell, to revive sorcerers from the dead and enslave mankind. Dave, the Prime Merlinian, a descendant of Merlin, will become powerful enough to cast spells without his ring, and is the only one who can stop her. After he loses control of animated cleaning mops, Dave decides to give up on magic, until Becky changes his mind. He returns to his underground subway lab, just after Drake and Horvath try to kill Balthazar and steal the Grimhold. Horvath has no more use for Drake, casts a parasite spell, steals Drake's energy, life, and his magic ring. Horvath releases the witch Abigail Williams (Nicole Ehinger), uses her to kidnap Becky, then steals her energy, life, and pendant. He threatens to kill Becky, forcing Dave to surrender the Grimhold and his ring. Balthazar then goes after Horvath in Battery Park, sure Dave, without his ring, will be killed. Horvath releases Morgana from inside Veronica. Morgana begins the Rising spell while Horvath animates the Charging Bull sculpture to attack Balthazar. With Becky's help, Dave reaches Horvath and Morgana. Balthazar's eagle flies away with the Bull. Balthazar takes Morgana, body and soul, from Veronica into himself, but being low on magic, Morgana escapes. Morgana tries to incinerate them, but Dave stops her, without the ring, proving he is the Prime Merlinian. Morgana shoots energy bolts and kills Balthazar. Dave creates a Tesla coil with the square's lamp posts and powerlines, and destroys her. Dave revives Balthazar by starting his heart, so Balthazar and Veronica reunite. Dave and Becky kiss, and fly to France on Balthazar's eagle. After the end credits, Horvath takes his hat from Balthazar's shop. The basic idea for the movie was mostly Nicolas Cage's, who wanted to explore a mystic world and play a character with magical powers, and following a suggestion by his producer friend Todd Garner, decided to make a feature length movie based upon the Fantasia segment of the same name. On February 12, 2007, this film was announced by Disney. References to the original animation include the scene where Dave animates broomsticks to clean his laboratory, and having Mickey Mouse's hat in the post-credits scene. The Sorcerer's Apprentice is set in New York City, and most scenes were shot on location, in places such as Washington Square Park and Chinatown's Eldrige Street. Dave's laboratory was filmed in either an abandoned subway station located under the New York City Hall or a studio recreation of it. In the early morning hours of May 4, 2009, a Ferrari F430 being driven during filming of a chase sequence, lost control and careened into the window of a Sbarro restaurant in Times Square, injuring two pedestrians, one of whom was struck by a falling lamppost. Filming resumed the following night, when yet another accident occurred. The two accidents were blamed on rain making the roads slick. To make the magic more believable, it was decided to an emphasis of practical, on-set effects, such as making real fire, with fluids or flash powder being used for colored flames. To provide a lighting reference for the plasma bolts, the actors wore gloves with LED displays to make them glow before adding the computer-generated shot. For floating objects, they were either thrown with wires or held by stuntmen wearing green chroma key suits. The film has received generally mixed reviews. Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 42% based on 163 reviews, with an average score of 5.2/10. The critical consensus is: It has a likeable cast and loads of CGI spectacle, but for all but the least demanding viewers, The Sorcerer's Apprentice will be less than spellbinding. Another review aggregator, Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating from 0-100 of top reviews from mainstream critics, calculated an average score of 46. Kirk Honeycutt of The Hollywood Reporter has said that "The Sorcerer's Apprentice is a tired relic of summer-movie cliches, clearly beaten to death by far too many credited writers." Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert gave the film two and a half stars out of four and wrote "This is a much better film than Airbender, which is faint praise, but it's becoming clear that every weekend brings another heavily marketed action "comedy" that pounds tens of millions out of consumers before evaporating". In July 2010, Parade Magazine listed the film #1 on its list of "Biggest Box Office Flops of 2010 (So Far). The Sorcerer's Apprentice made an opening gross of $3,873,997 on its first day (Wednesday July 14, 2010). It finished at #3 on its first weekend with $17,619,622 behind Inception and Despicable Me in the U.S. and Canada and gained another $8,928,216 on its first weekend overseas (in 13 countries) for a worldwide opening of $26,547,841. On October 28, 2010, The Sorcerer's Apprentice closed at the box-office in the United States and Canada with $63,150,991 and, as of December 12, 2010, it has earned $152,132,612 in other countries totaling up to $215,283,603 worldwide. Besides the U.S. and Canada, other countries where it grossed more than $10 million were Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States ($13,630,194), France and the Maghreb region ($12,930,320) and Japan ($10,632,660). Its largest overseas weekend was August 13–15, during which it grossed $14,091,169 in 42 countries. It occupies the fourth place on the all-time chart of Sword and Sorcery movies in the U.S. and Canada, and the third place on the same chart worldwide. It has sold 1,288,735 DVD units (equivalent to $21,609,680) since its release in DVD. Adding in its box-office revenue, the film's earnings sum up to $236,893,283. The score for this film was conducted and recorded by Trevor Rabin. It was released on July 6, 2010.][
Shrek Forever After (advertised as Shrek: The Final Chapter) is a 2010 American 3D computer-animated fantasy comedy film, and the fourth and final installment in the Shrek series, produced by DreamWorks Animation. The film was released by Paramount Pictures in cinemas on May 20, 2010 in Russia and on May 21, 2010 in the United States. It was also released in 3D and IMAX 3D formats. Although the film received mixed reviews from critics and opened lower than expected, it remained as the #1 film in the United States and Canada for three consecutive weeks and has grossed a worldwide total of over $752 million, making it a commercial success. Additionally, Shrek Forever After is DreamWorks Animation's second highest-grossing film at the foreign box office which Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted surpassed. It is also the second highest grossing animated film of 2010, behind Toy Story 3. Before Shrek and Donkey rescue Princess Fiona in the first film (despite Shrek's deal with Lord Farquaad), King Harold and Queen Lillian – desperate to lift their daughter's curse (despite Harold's deal with the Fairy Godmother and Prince Charming) – meet with con artist Rumpelstiltskin, who wishes to become King of Far Far Away in exchange for helping them. But before the deal is signed, Harold and Lillian learn that Fiona has been rescued. Rumpelstiltskin is then shown to have become washed up as a result and subsequently bitter towards Shrek for inadvertently ruining his plans. In the present, Shrek has steadily grown tired of being a family man and celebrity among the local villagers, leading him to yearn for the days when he felt like a "real ogre". He takes his family to Far Far Away to celebrate his children's first birthday. Shrek gets annoyed when the three little pigs eat the kids' cake along with most of the other party food. A boy named Butterpants (who is said to be a "big fan" of Shrek) demands that Shrek roar. After he lets out a frustrated roar the entire crowd cheers, reinforcing his belief that no one considers him to be a true ogre. This coupled with the fact that the birthday cakes were decorated with a "cute" Ogre named "Sprinkles" finally makes Shrek lose his temper and smashes the new birthday cake in front of everyone, then walks out in anger. He and Fiona argue outside about his reaction which ends with Shrek rashly agreeing that he was happier before he'd rescued her. After storming off, Shrek encounters Rumpelstiltskin. Rumpel, who had observed Shrek's angry outburst with Fiona, seizes his chance. He follows Shrek and arranges what appears to be an accident where he is trapped under his carriage. Shrek helps him and Rumpel being "grateful", gives Shrek a ride and a meal. When Shrek voices his frustrations, Rumpel offers to give Shrek a day to live like a real ogre in exchange for a day from his childhood that he would not remember being erased. Shrek signs the contract and appears in a reality where he is still feared by villagers. He takes the opportunity to cause some light hearted mischief until he finds wanted posters for the ogress Fiona and his home deserted and desolate. He is kidnapped by witches and taken to Rumpelstiltskin, now the King of Far Far Away and possibly Emperor of a good deal more, which has become derelict and run down. Rumpelstiltskin uses ogres (and some of Shrek's friends) for slavery. Upon inquiry, Rumpelstiltskin reveals that the day he erased was the day that Shrek was born. Therefore, Shrek never saved Fiona, never met Donkey, and consequently Rumpelstiltskin was able to get Harold and Lillian to sign their kingdom away, then cause them to disappear. When the day ends, Shrek will fade from existence. Shrek escapes Rumpelstiltskin's castle with Donkey. Initially terrified of Shrek, Donkey decides to trust him after seeing Shrek cry over his erased history, something he had never seen an ogre do before. After Shrek explains the situation, Donkey helps him find a loophole: the contract will be nullified if Shrek and Fiona share true love's kiss. Shrek and Donkey first travel to the dragon's keep where Fiona was kept and find the place deserted and the lava from the crater under the castle has been drained. They soon encounter a band of ogres who are resisting Rumpelstiltskin. The ogres are led by Fiona, who is still cursed after escaping from the tower where she was held captive, and keeps the retired and overweight Puss in Boots as a pet. Shrek does everything he can to gain Fiona's love, but she is too busy preparing an ambush on Rumpelstiltskin. She is also bitterly cynical and disillusioned about the power of true love and throws herself into planning Rumpelstiltskin's capture. While sparring with her, Fiona begins to like Shrek, but stops short of kissing him. Shrek is discouraged, but Puss encourages him to continue pursuing Fiona. During the ambush, the ogres are captured by the Pied Piper, though Shrek and Fiona managed to escape with the intervention of Puss and Donkey. Shrek insists Fiona kiss him, saying it will fix everything, but because Fiona does not truly love him it is ineffective. Upon hearing that Rumpelstiltskin is offering anything desired by the one who captures Shrek, Shrek surrenders himself in exchange for "all ogres" being released. Fiona remains in custody because, as Rumpelstiltskin points out, she is not "all ogre" (only by night, not by day). Shrek and Fiona are to be fed to Dragon, but Donkey, Puss and the ogres raid Rumpelstiltskin's castle, allowing Shrek and Fiona to both subdue Dragon and capture Rumpelstiltskin. As the sun rises, Shrek begins to fade from existence. But Fiona, having fallen in love with him, kisses him just before he disappears, thereby voiding the contract and restoring the world to just before Shrek originally lashed out at everyone. Shrek embraces his friends and family with a newfound appreciation for everything he has, truly living happily ever after. Cast members of Shrek Forever After at the premiere of the film at the 2010 Tribeca Film Festival Following the success of Shrek 2, a third and fourth Shrek film, along with plans for a final, fifth film, were announced in May 2004 by Jeffrey Katzenberg: "Shrek 3 and 4 are going to reveal other unanswered questions and, finally, in the last chapter, we will understand how Shrek came to be in that swamp, when we meet him in the first movie." Katzenberg announced a title for the fourth film in October 2007, Shrek Goes Fourth, explaining it: "Shrek goes out into the world, forth!" However, in May 2009, DreamWorks Animation retitled the film to Shrek Forever After, indicating that it would be the last in the Shrek series. In November, Bill Damaschke, head of creative production at DreamWorks Animation, confirmed with "All that was loved about Shrek in the first film is brought to the final film." Tim Sullivan was hired to write the script in 2005, but was later replaced by Darren Lemke and Josh Klausner. Klausner said about the script's evolution: "When I first came onto the project, it wasn't supposed to be the final chapter – there were originally going to be 5 Shrek movies. Then, about a year into the development, Jeffrey Katzenberg decided that the story that we'd come up with was the right way for Shrek's journey to end, which was incredibly flattering." Mike Mitchell would on board to direct the new installment, shortly before the release of the third film. There were also rumors in September 2008, while the film was still in pre-production, that Tom Cruise was considered voicing the movie's villain, but these would be later wrecked. Much of the film was written and recorded in New York City. Similar to most of the other Shrek films, the film's original score was composed by British composer Harry Gregson-Williams. Shrek Forever After premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 21, 2010. It was publicly released on May 20, 2010, in Russia, while the American release followed the next day. The film was also released in IMAX 3D format. It was released on DVD, Blu-ray, and Blu-ray / DVD Combo Pack on December 7, 2010. As of March 13, 2011, the DVD has sold 3,438,198 copies and has made $57,634,242. The film is also included in Shrek: The Whole Story, a box set released on the same day that included all 4 moviesShrek and additional bonus content. Shrek Forever After received mixed reviews with several critics claiming that the film is better than Shrek the Third, but lacking the story-rich detail as Shrek and Shrek 2. Review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes reported that 57% of critics have given the film a positive review, based on 188 reviews, with an average score of 5.9/10. Its consensus states "While not without its moments, Shrek Forever After too often feels like a rote rehashing of the franchise's earlier entries." Another review aggregator, Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 top reviews from mainstream critics, calculated an average score of 58 based on 35 reviews. Pete Hammond of Boxoffice gave the film 4.5 stars out of 5 writing "Hilarious and heartfelt from start to finish, this is the best Shrek of them all, and that's no fairy tale. Borrowing liberally from Frank Capra's It's a Wonderful Life, this edition blends big laughs and emotion to explore what Far Far Away might have been like if Shrek never existed." James Berardinelli of Reelviews awarded the film 3/4 stars stating "Even though Shrek Forever After is obligatory and unnecessary, it's better than Shrek the Third and it's likely that most who attend as a way of saying goodbye to the Jolly Green Ogre will not find themselves wishing they had sought out a more profitable way of spending 90-odd minutes." Writing her critique for Entertainment Weekly, Lisa Schwarzbaum graded the film a B- claiming "Everyone involved fulfills his or her job requirements adequately. But, the magic is gone, and Shrek Forever After is no longer an ogre phenomenon to reckon with." Rolling Stone film critic Peter Travers wrote "It's a fun ride. What's missing is the excitement of a new interpretation." Mary Pols, film critic for Time, concluded her review with "Can an ogre jump a shark? I think so." Giving the film 1 star out of 4, Kyle Smith of the New York Post wrote that "After the frantic spurt of fairy-tale allusions and jokes in the first three Shreks, this one inches along with a few mostly pointless action scenes and the occasional mild pun." Shrek Forever After earned $238,736,787 in North America, and $513,864,080 in other countries, for a worldwide total of $752,600,867. It is the 47th highest-grossing film, the 8th highest-grossing animated film, the fifth highest-grossing of 2010, the second highest-grossing 2010 animated film (behind Toy Story 3), and the second lowest-grossing Shrek film. Shrek Forever After had the widest release for an animated film (4,359 theaters - later expanded to 4,389) in North America. On its opening day (May 21, 2010) it took first place, grossing $20.8 million, which was lower than the opening days of the last two Shrek films. The film then opened in three days with $70,838,207, lower than box office analysts predictions of a $105 million opening and also lower than the two previous films of the franchise. Anne Globe, head of worldwide marketing for DreamWorks Animation, said they were happy with the film's opening since it debuted at #1 and also had the fifth best opening for an animated film at the American and Canadian box office. Shrek Forever After was in first place for three consecutive weekends. In North America, it was the eighth highest-grossing film of 2010, the fourth highest-grossing DreamWorks Animation film, 2010's third highest grossing animated film, trailing Toy Story 3 and Despicable Me and the lowest-grossing Shrek film. Executives at DreamWorks Animation were impressed because the film earned $238.7 million in North America, although it was the fourth film in the series, seemingly being outgrown by its fans. Having made $513.9 million in other continents, it is the highest-grossing Shrek film, DreamWorks Animation's second biggest hit (behind Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted), and the seventh highest-grossing animated film. It topped the weekend box office once, on July 16–18, 2010, with $46.3 million. In Russia and the CIS, its second highest-grossing country, it had a $19.7 million opening weekend which was a record among animated films. It earned $51.4 million in total. Third in terms of total earnings came the United Kingdom, Ireland and Malta, where it opened with £8.96 million ($13.6 million) and finished its box office run with £31.1 million ($51.1 million). Shrek Forever After is an action-adventure video game based on the movie of the same name. It was released by Activision on May 18, 2010. Following the success of Shrek 2 in May 2004, Jeffrey Katzenberg revealed that the Shrek story had been outlined into five films almost from the beginning. "Before the first one was finished we talked about what the whole story of Shrek is, and each of the chapters answers questions about the first movie and gives us an insight," said Katzenberg, "Shrek 3 and 4 are going to reveal other unanswered questions and, finally, in the last chapter, we will understand how Shrek came to be in that swamp, when we meet him in the first movie." After the release of Shrek the Third in 2007, Katzenberg announced that the fifth film would be released in 2013. In May 2009, DreamWorks Animation (DWA) announced that the fourth film's title would be Shrek Forever After, indicating that it would be the last in the Shrek series. Later that year, that was confirmed by Bill Damaschke, head of creative production at DWA, with him saying: "All that was loved about Shrek in the first film is brought to the final film." Josh Klausner, one of the writers of Shrek Forever After, explained in 2010 the script's evolution: "When I first came onto the project, it wasn't supposed to be the final chapter — there were originally going to be 5 Shrek movies. Then, about a year into the development, Jeffrey Katzenberg decided that the story that we'd come up with was the right way for Shrek's journey to end..." Puss in Boots is a computer-animated feature film that was released on October 28, 2011. The movie is based on and follows the character of Puss in Boots on his adventures with Kitty Softpaws and mastermind Humpty Dumpty before his first appearance in Shrek 2.
Shrek is a 2001 American computer-animated fantasy-comedy film produced by PDI/DreamWorks, released by DreamWorks Pictures, directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, featuring the voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, and John Lithgow. It is loosely based on William Steig's 1990 fairy tale picture book Shrek!, and somewhat serves as a parody film, targeting other films adapted from various children’s fantasies (mainly animated Disney films). The film made notable use of popular music; the soundtrack includes music by Smash Mouth, Eels, Joan Jett, The Proclaimers, Jason Wade, Baha Men, and John Cale (covering Leonard Cohen). The rights to the books were originally bought by Steven Spielberg in 1991, before the founding of DreamWorks, when he thought about making a traditionally animated film based on the book. However, John H. Williams convinced him to bring the film to DreamWorks in 1994, the time the studio was founded, and the film was put quickly into active development by Jeffrey Katzenberg after the rights were bought by the studio in 1995. Shrek originally cast Chris Farley to do the voice for the title character, recording about 80%–90% of his dialog. But since Farley died in 1997 before he could finish, Mike Myers was put in to work for the character, who after his first recording decided to record his voice in a Scottish accent. The film was also originally planned to be motion-captured, but after poor results, the studio decided to get PDI to help Shrek get its final computer-animated look. Earning $484.4 million at the worldwide box office, the film was a critical and commercial success. Shrek also received promotion from food chains such as Baskin-Robbins (promoting the film's DVD release) and Burger King. It was acclaimed as an animated film worthy of adult interest, with many adult-oriented jokes and themes but a simple enough plot and humour to appeal to children. Shrek won the first ever Academy Award for Best Animated Feature and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. The film was also nominated for six BAFTAs, including the BAFTA Award for Best Actor in a Supporting Role for Eddie Murphy for his voice-over performance as Donkey, and won the BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. The film's main (and title) character was awarded his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in May 2010. Shrek established DreamWorks Animation as a prime competitor to Pixar in the field of feature film animation, particularly in computer animation. The film's success prompted DreamWorks to create three sequels, Shrek 2, Shrek the Third, and Shrek Forever After, two holiday specials, Shrek the Halls and Scared Shrekless, and a spin-off film, Puss in Boots. A fifth film, planned as the last of the series, was cancelled in 2009 with the announcement that the fourth film would conclude the series. The film's success also inspired other merchandise, such as video games, a stage musical and even a comic book by Dark Horse Comics. Shrek (Mike Myers), a grouchy, terrifying green ogre that has always enjoyed living in peaceful solitude in his swamp, finds his life utterly disturbed when thousands of various fairytale characters are exiled into his swamp by order of the obsessive, evil, fairy-tale hating Lord Farquaad (John Lithgow). Shrek announces to the fairytale creatures that he will go to see Farquaad to move them out of his swamp and back to where they came from. Shrek brings along a talking Donkey (Eddie Murphy). Meanwhile, Farquaad tortures the Gingerbread Man (Conrad Vernon) into revealing the whereabouts of the remaining fairytale creatures until his guards rush in with an object Farquaad has been searching for: the Magic Mirror. The Mirror tells Farquaad that he can only become a real king by marrying a princess, completely disregarding his original question about whether his kingdom was the fairest of them all. The Mirror gives him three princesses to choose from, in a parody of The Dating Game: Cinderella, Snow White, and Princess Fiona (Cameron Diaz). Farquaad chooses Fiona. The Mirror tells him that he shouldn't mention "the little thing that happens at night", which is later revealed to be a curse. Shrek and Donkey arrive at Farquaad's palace in Duloc, where they find themselves in the midst of a tournament. The winner will have the "privilege" of attempting to rescue Fiona from a castle surrounded by lava and protected by a fire-breathing dragon so that Farquaad may marry her. Shrek, with some help from Donkey, easily defeats the other knights in a fashion that resembles a wrestling match and Farquaad agrees to remove the fairytale creatures from the swamp if Shrek rescues Fiona. Shrek and Donkey travel to the castle and split up to find Fiona. Donkey encounters the dragon and sweet-talks the beast to save himself before discovering that the dragon is female. Dragon takes a liking to Donkey and carries him to her chambers. When Shrek finds Fiona, she is appalled at his lack of romanticism. As they are leaving, Shrek manages to save Donkey, caught in Dragon's tender clutches, and causing her to become irate, chasing Shrek, Fiona, and Donkey out of the castle. At first, Fiona is thrilled to be rescued but quickly becomes disappointed when Shrek takes his helmet off and she realizes that he is an ogre. When the three make their return journey to Farquaad's palace, Fiona urges Shrek and Donkey to camp out for the night and decides to sleep in a cave. Shrek and Donkey, meanwhile, stay awake and watch the stars while Shrek tells stories about great ogres and informs Donkey that he plans to build a 10-foot wall around his swamp when he returns. When Donkey persistently asks Shrek why he is doing this, Shrek sadly confesses to him that everyone judges him before they know him; therefore, he feels he is better off alone, despite Donkey's admittance that he did not immediately judge him when they first met. The next day, Shrek and Fiona find they have more in common with each other along the way, and fall in love. Later, the trio is almost to Duloc, and that night Fiona takes shelter in a nearby abandoned windmill. When Donkey hears strange noises coming from the windmill, he finds that Fiona has turned into an ogress. Fiona explains she was cursed as a child and turns into an ogress every night, which is why she was locked away in the castle, and that only a kiss from her true love will return her to her "love's true form". Shrek, about to confess his feelings for Fiona and attempts give her a sunflower, overhears part of their conversation, and is heartbroken as he misinterprets her disgust at her transformation into an "ugly beast" as being disgusted with him. Fiona makes Donkey promise not to tell Shrek about the spell, vowing to do it herself, but when the next morning comes, Shrek has brought Lord Farquaad to Fiona. The couple return to Duloc, while a hurt Shrek leaves his friendship with Donkey, out of anger and returns to his now-vacated swamp, remembering what Fiona "said" about him. Despite his privacy, Shrek find that he is miserable and misses Fiona. Furious at Shrek for what he did, Donkey comes to the swamp where Shrek reveals that he overheard Donkey and Fiona's conversation. Donkey keeps his promise to Fiona and tells Shrek that she was talking about someone else. He then accepts Shrek's apology and tells him that Fiona will be getting married shortly, urging Shrek into action to gain Fiona's true love. They are able to travel to Duloc quickly, thanks to Dragon, who had escaped her confines and followed Donkey. Shrek interrupts the wedding before Farquaad can kiss Fiona, and tells Fiona that Farquaad is not her true love, but only marrying her to become king. The sun set, which causes Fiona to turn into an ogress in front of everyone in the church, causes Shrek to fully understand what he overheard at the windmill. Farquaad, disgusted over the change, orders Shrek killed and Fiona imprisoned, but Shrek whistles for Dragon. Dragon bursts in along with Donkey, and devours Farquaad. Shrek and Fiona admit their love for each other and share a kiss; Fiona is bathed in light as her curse is broken, but is surprised to find that she has remained an ogress, as she thought she was supposed to become beautiful, to which Shrek replies that she is beautiful. The two of them get married in the swamp and depart on their honeymoon while the rest celebrate by singing "I'm a Believer". Cinderella, Snow White, Pied Piper, and several other characters are not speaking roles and are thus uncredited At the time DreamWorks was founded, producer John H. Williams got hold of the book from his children, and when he brought it to DreamWorks, it caught Jeffrey Katzenberg's attention and the studio decided to make it into a movie. After buying the rights to the film, Katzenberg quickly put the film in active development in November 1995. Steven Spielberg had thought about making a traditionally animated film of the book before, when he bought the rights to the book in 1991, before the founding of DreamWorks, where Bill Murray would play Shrek and Steve Martin would play Donkey. In the beginning of production, co-director Andrew Adamson refused to be intimidated by Katzenberg, and had an argument with him how much should the film appeal to adults. Katzenberg wanted both audiences, but he found some of Adamson's ideas about adding sexual jokes and Guns N' Roses music to the soundtrack a bit too outrageous. Andrew Adamson and Kelly Asbury joined in 1997 to co-direct the film. However, Asbury left a year later for work on the 2002 film Spirit: Stallion of the Cimarron, and was replaced with story artist Vicky Jenson. Both Adamson and Jenson decided to work on the film in half, so the crew could at least know who to go to with specific detail questions about the film's sequences; "We both ended up doing a lot of everything", Adamson said. "We're both kinda control freaks, and we both wanted to do everything." Some early sketches of Shrek's house were done in 1996 through 1997 using Photoshop, with the sketches showing Shrek first living in a garbage dump near a human village called Wart Creek. It was also thought one time that he lived with his parents and kept rotting fish in his bedroom. Donkey was modeled after Pericles (born 1994; also known as Perry), a real miniature donkey from Barron Park, Palo Alto, California. Raman Hui, supervising animator of Shrek, stated that Fiona "wasn't based on any real person." and he did many different sketches for Princess Fiona and had done over 100 sculptures of Fiona before the directors picked the final design. In early development, the Art Directors visited Hearst Castle, Stratford upon Avon and Dordogne for inspiration. Art Director Douglas Rogers visited a magnolia plantation in Charleston, South Carolina for inspiration for Shrek's swamp. Planned characters not used in the film include Goldilocks and Sleeping Beauty. Chris Farley was planned to do the voice for Shrek which he recorded 80 to 90% (or 95% according to Farley's brother Tom) of the dialogue for the character, but died before completing the project. DreamWorks then re-cast the voice role to Mike Myers, who insisted on a complete script rewrite, to leave no traces of Farley's version of Shrek. After Myers had completed providing the voice for the character, when the film was well into production, he asked to re-record all of his lines in a Scottish accent similar to the one his mother had used when she told him bedtime stories and also used for his roles in other films such as, So I Married an Axe Murderer & Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me. After hearing the alternative, Katzenberg agreed to redo scenes in the film, saying, "It was so good we took $4m worth of animation out and did it again." Because of Myers voicing the character, more ideas began to come; There were clearer story points, fresher gags and comedy bits. Myers said: "I got a letter from Spielberg thanking me so much for caring about the character... And he said the Scottish accent had improved the movie." Another person planned to voice a character in the film was Janeane Garofalo, who was set to star alongside Farley as Princess Fiona. However, she was fired from the project with little explanation. Years later, Garofalo stated "I was never told why [I was fired]. I assume because I sound like a man sometimes? I don't know why. Nobody told me... But, you know, the movie didn't do anything, so who cares?" Shrek was originally set up to be a live-action/CG animation hybrid with background plate miniature sets and the main characters composited into the scene as motion-captured computer graphics, using an ExpertVision Hires Falcon 10 camera system to capture and apply realistic human movement to the characters. A sizable crew was hired to run a test, and after a year and a half of R & D, the test was finally screened in May 1997. The results were not satisfactory, with Katzenberg stating, "It looked terrible, it didn't work, it wasn't funny, and we didn't like it." The studio then turned to its production partners at PDI, who began production with the studio in 1998 and helped Shrek to get its final, computer-animated look. At this time, Antz was still in production by the studio and Effects Supervisor Ken Bielenberg was asked by Aron Warner "to start development for Shrek." Similar to previous PDI films, PDI used its own proprietary software (like its own Fluid Animation System) for its animated movies. However, for some elements it also took advantage of some of the powerhouse animation software that was in the market. This is particularly true with Maya, which PDI used for most of its dynamic cloth animation and for the hair of Fiona and Farquaad. “We did a lot of work on character and set-up, and then kept changing the set up while we were doing the animation,” Hui noted. “In Antz, we had a facial system that gave us all the facial muscles under the skin. In Shrek, we applied that to whole body. So if you pay attention to Shrek when he talks, you see that when he opens his jaw, he forms a double chin, because we have the fat and the muscles underneath. That kind of detail took us a long time to get right." One of the most difficult parts of creating the film was making Donkey's fur flow smoothly so that it didn't look like a Chia Pet's fur. This fell into the hands of the surfacing animators who used flow controls within a complex shader to provide the fur with many attributes (ability to change directions, lie flat, swirl, etc.). It was then the job of the visual effects group, lead by Ken Bielenberg, to make the fur react to environment conditions. Once the technology was mastered, it was able to be applied to many aspects of the Shrek movie including grass, moss, beards, eyebrows, and even threads on Shrek's tunic. Making Human hair realistic was different from Donkey's fur. It required a separate rendering system and a lot of attention from the lighting and visual effects teams. Aron Warner said that the creators "envisioned a magical environment that you could immerse yourself into." Shrek includes 36 separate in-film locations to make the world of the film, which DreamWorks claimed was more than any previous computer animated feature before. In-film locations were finalized and as demonstrated by past DreamWorks animated movies, color and mood was of the utmost importance. As the film was about to be completed, Katzenberg suggested to the filmmakers to redo the film's ending in order to "go out with a big laugh"; Instead of ending film with just a storybook closing over Shrek and Fiona as they ride off into the sunset, they decided to add a song "I'm a Believer" by Smash Mouth and show all the fairytale creatures in the film. Shrek is the third DreamWorks animated film (and the only film in the Shrek series) to have Harry Gregson-Williams team up with John Powell to composes the score (after Antz (1998) and Chicken Run (2000)). The film references in many places classic movies, especially those by Disney: In 2000, IMAX released CyberWorld onto its branded large-screen theaters. It was a compilation film that featured stereoscopic conversions of various animated shorts and sequences, including the bar sequence in Antz. DreamWorks was so impressed by the technology used for the sequence's "stereoscopic translation", that the studio and IMAX decided to plan a big-screen 3D version of Shrek. The film would have been re-released during the Christmas season of 2001, or the following summer, after its conventional 2D release. The re-release would have also included new sequences and an alternate ending. Plans for this was dropped due to "creative changes" instituted by DreamWorks and resulted in a loss of $1.18 million, down from IMAX's profit of $3.24 million. Radio Disney was told not to allow any ads for the film to air on the station, stating, "Due to recent initiatives with The Walt Disney Company, we are being asked not to align ourselves promotionally with this new release Shrek. Stations may accept spot dollars only in individual markets." On May 7, 2001, Burger King began promotions for the film, giving out a selection of nine exclusive Candy Caddies based on the Shrek characters, in Big Kids Meal and Kids Meal orders. Ice cream chain Baskin-Robbins also ran an 8-week promotion of the film, selling products such as Shrek's Hot Sludge Sundae, a combination of Oreo Cookies 'n Cream ice cream, hot fudge, crushed chocolate cookies, whipped cream and squiggly gummy worms, and Shrek Freeze Frame Cake, featuring an image of Shrek and Donkey framed by sunflowers. This was to support the film's DVD/VHS release. The film was released on VHS and DVD on November 2, 2001. Both releases included Shrek in the Swamp Karaoke Dance Party!, a 3-minute musical short film, that takes up right after the Shrek's ending, with film's characters performing a medley of modern pop songs. Shrek was released to video on Friday, the same day that Pixar's Monsters, Inc. hit theaters. Since videos were traditionally released on Tuesdays, Disney's executives didn't received that well, saying "that the move seemed like an underhanded attempt to siphon off some of their film's steam". DreamWorks responded that "it simply shifted the release to a Friday to make it more of an event and predicted that it and other studios would do so more frequently with important films." Monsters, Inc. earned that weekend more than $62 million, breaking the record for an animated film, while the Shrek's video release made more than $100 million, and eventually became the biggest selling DVD of all time with over 5.5 million sales. A 3D version of the film was released on Blu-ray 3D on December 1, 2010, along with its sequels. The films were sold separately in 2012. Shrek was very well-received, with critics praising Shrek as an animated film worthy of adult interest, with many adult-oriented jokes and themes but a simple enough plot and humor to appeal to children. Review aggregate Rotten Tomatoes reports that 89% of critics have given the film a positive review based on 176 reviews, with an average score of 7.7/10. The critical consensus is: While simultaneously embracing and subverting fairy tales, the irreverent Shrek also manages to tweak Disney's nose, provide a moral message to children, and offer viewers a funny, fast-paced ride. Roger Ebert praised the film, giving it four stars out of a possible four and describing it as "jolly and wicked, filled with sly in-jokes and yet somehow possessing a heart." USA Today's Susan Wloszczyna praised Eddie Murphy's performance, stating it "gives the comic performance of his career, aided by sensational digital artistry, as he brays for the slightly neurotic motormouth." Richard Schickel also enjoyed Murphy's role, stating, "No one has ever made a funnier jackass of himself than Murphy." Peter Rainer of New York magazine liked the script, also stating that "The animation, directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, is often on the same wriggly, giggly level as the script, although the more "human" characters, such as Princess Fiona and Lord Farquaad, are less interesting than the animals and creatures -- a common pitfall in animated films of all types." William Steig, the author of the original book, and his wife Jeanne Steig also enjoyed the film, stating "We all went sort of expecting to hate it, thinking, 'What has Hollywood done to it?' But we loved it. We were afraid it would be too sickeningly cute and, instead, Bill just thought they did a wonderful, witty job of it." Shrek opened in more than 3,587 movie theaters on its 2001 release, eleven of them showing them digitally, made possible by the THX Division of Lucasfilm. This was the first time that DreamWorks had shown one of its films digitally. The film earned $11,573,015 on its first day and $42,347,760 on its opening weekend, topping the box office for the weekend and averaging $11,805 from 3,587 theaters. In its second weekend, due to the Memorial Day Weekend holiday, the film gained 0.3 percent to $42,481,425 and $55,215,620 over the four-day weekend, resulting in an overall 30 percent gain. Despite this, the film finished in second place behind Pearl Harbor and had an average of $15,240 from expanding to 3,623 sites. In its third weekend, the film retreated 34 percent to $28,172,869 for a $7,695 average from expanding to 3,661 theaters. The film closed on December 6, 2001, after grossing $267,665,011 domestically, along with $216,744,207 overseas, for a worldwide total of $484,409,218. Produced on a $60 million budget, the film was a huge box office smash and is the fourth highest-grossing film of 2001 behind Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, and Monsters, Inc.. Shrek became the highest-grossing animated film ever to be released in Australia, passing the mark set by The Lion King in 1994. In the United Kingdom, Shrek regained the top spot at the British box office after being beaten out the previous week by Lara Croft: Tomb Raider, earning a $20.3 million since its opening in the UK. At the 74th Academy Awards, Shrek won the first ever Academy Award For Best Animated Feature, beating Monsters, Inc. and Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius. Entertainment Weekly put it on its end-of-the-decade, "best-of" list, saying, "Prince Charming? So last millennium. This decade, fairy-tale fans — and Princess Fiona — fell for a fat and flatulent Ogre. Now, that's progress." Shrek was also nominated for 6 BAFTA Award, including the BAFTA Award for Best Film. Eddie Murphy became the first actor to ever receive a BAFTA nomination for a voice-over performance. The film was also nominated for Best Visual Effects, Best Sound, Best Film Music, and won the BAFTA Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. Shrek was nominated for a dozen Annie Awards from ASIFA-Hollywood, and won eight Annies including Best Animated Feature and Outstanding Individual Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production. In June 2008, the American Film Institute revealed its "Ten top Ten"; the best ten films in ten "classic" American film genres—after polling over 1,500 people from the creative community Shrek was acknowledged as the eighth best film in the animated genre, and the only non-Disney·Pixar film in the Top 10. It is also third on Bravo's 100 funniest films. Shrek was also ranked second in a Channel 4 poll of the "100 Greatest Family Films", losing out on the top spot to E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. In 2005, Shrek came sixth in Channel 4's 100 Greatest Cartoons poll behind The Simpsons, Tom and Jerry, South Park, Toy Story and Family Guy. In November 2009, the character, Lord Farquaad, was listed #14 in IGN UK's "Top 15 Fantasy Villains". American Film Institute recognition: The film was entered into the 2001 Cannes Film Festival, and was the first animated film since Disney's Peter Pan (1953) to receive that honour. Previous films and TV shows, such as Fractured Fairy Tales and The Princess Bride, have parodied the traditional fairy tale. However, Shrek itself has noticeably influenced the current generation of mainstream animated films. Particularly after Shrek 2, animated films began to incorporate more pop culture references and end-film musical numbers. Such elements can be seen in films like Ice Age: The Meltdown, Robots, and Chicken Little. It also inspired a number of computer animated films which also spoofed fairy tales, or other related story genres, often including adult-oriented humor, most of which were not nearly as successful as Shrek, such as Happily N'Ever After, Igor, and Hoodwinked!. Shrek was also occasionally referenced In the 2007 post apocalyptic horror film I Am Legend. Several video game adaptations of the film have been published on various game console platforms. Shrek was also included as a bonus unlockable character in the video game Tony Hawk's Underground 2. (2004) In 2003, Dark Horse Comics released a Shrek three-issue mini-series comic book adaptation, written by Mark Evanier, which were collected into a trade paperback. A musical version, based on the film, with music by Jeanine Tesori and a book and lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire, opened on Broadway on December 14, 2008, and closed January 3, 2010, running for a total of 441 performances. It starred Brian d'Arcy James in the title role, Sutton Foster as Princess Fiona, Christopher Sieber as Lord Farquaad, Daniel Breaker as Donkey, and John Tartaglia as Pinocchio. A North American Tour opened July 25, 2010, in Chicago. A London production opened in the West End on June 7, 2011. The musical received many Tony Award nominations and won the 2009 Tony Award for Best Costume Design. It received five Laurence Olivier Award nominations including Best New Musical. Shrek had three sequels which included Shrek 2, Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After. Although Shrek 2 received similar acclaim from critics, the last two movies did not receive as much critical acclaim. They were however still box office hits. There were also two holiday specials called Shrek the Halls and Scared Shrekless, a spin-off called Puss in Boots (a prequel to the Shrek series, exploring Puss's origin story and his life prior to meeting Shrek and Donkey) and several shorts. A fifth feature film was also planned for release, but was later cancelled in 2009, after it was decided that Shrek Forever After (originally titled Shrek Goes Fourth) was to be the last film in the series.
Shrek 2 is a 2004 American computer-animated fantasy comedy film produced by DreamWorks Animation and directed by Andrew Adamson, Kelly Asbury and Conrad Vernon. It is the second installment in the Shrek series, the sequel to 2001's Shrek, and features the voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, Antonio Banderas, Julie Andrews, John Cleese, Rupert Everett and Jennifer Saunders. Like its predecessor, Shrek 2 received positive reviews. Shrek 2 scored the second-largest three-day opening weekend in US history at the time of release, as well as the largest opening for an animated film until May 18, 2007, when it was eclipsed by its sequel Shrek the Third. As of 2011, it is the inflation-adjusted 31st highest-grossing film of all time in the US. It went on to be the highest-grossing film of 2004. The associated soundtrack reached the top ten of the 200Billboard. It is also the seventh highest ticket selling animated film of all time. It is DreamWorks's most successful film to date and was also the highest-grossing animated film of all time worldwide for six years until Toy Story 3 surpassed it in 2010, along with the re-releases of The Lion King in late 2011 and Finding Nemo in 2012, making it the 4th highest grossing animated film of all time. After Shrek (voiced by Mike Myers) and Fiona (voiced by Cameron Diaz) come back from their honeymoon, they are invited to a royal ball thrown by Fiona's parents to celebrate their marriage, an event in which Shrek is reluctant to participate. Donkey (voiced by Eddie Murphy) appears, wanting to move in with them after a falling-out with Dragon, much to their consternation. They all travel to the kingdom of Far Far Away and meet Fiona's parents, King Harold and Queen Lillian (voiced by John Cleese and Julie Andrews), who are surprised by Fiona's choice of husband and her new appearance. Harold is repulsed and at a family dinner, he and Shrek get into a heated argument over how Shrek and Fiona will raise their family. Fiona, disgusted at their behavior, locks herself in her room, where she meets her Fairy Godmother (voiced by Jennifer Saunders), who is also startled by Fiona's new looks and marriage. Subsequently, King Harold is accosted by the Fairy Godmother and Prince Charming, her son (voiced by Rupert Everett). He had arranged with the Fairy Godmother that Charming would marry Fiona and they demand that he get rid of Shrek. Shrek worries that he and Fiona aren't meant to be, particularly after finding a diary from her pre-teenager years and discovering that she was once very infatuated with Prince Charming. Harold arranges for Shrek and Donkey to join him on a hunting trip, which is really a trap to lure the two into the hands of an assassin, Puss in Boots (voiced by Antonio Banderas). When Fiona realizes that Shrek left, she asks her father for help, but he replies that he always wanted the best for her and that she should think about that too. Puss is unable to defeat Shrek and reveals that he was paid by Harold. He asks to tag along as a way to make amends. Shrek decides to go to the Fairy Godmother for help. However, the Fairy Godmother states that ogres do not live "happily ever after" and refuses to assist him. Nonetheless, the three sneak into the Fairy Godmother's potion factory and steal a "Happily Ever After" potion that Shrek believes will ensure a happy ending for his marriage. Shrek and Donkey both drink the potion, which doesn't appear to work. They wait out the storm in a barn and Shrek and Donkey become dizzy and fall over into a deep sleep. When they awake, they discover the potion has taken effect: Shrek is now a handsome man, while Donkey has turned into a stallion. In order to make the change permanent, Shrek must kiss Fiona by midnight. Shrek, Donkey, and Puss return to the castle to discover that the potion has also transformed Fiona back into her former human self from the first movie. However, the Fairy Godmother, having learned of the potion's theft, sends Charming to the castle, where he poses as Shrek to win Fiona's love. Although Harold recognizes Charming for who he really is, he doesn't speak up. Shrek, heartbroken, lets Fiona go, believing she will be happier with Charming. A few hours later, Shrek overhears the Fairy Godmother telling Harold that Fiona hasn't fallen for Charming, and giving him a love potion for Fiona, which will cause her to fall in love with the first person she kisses. Harold at first refuses, but the Fairy Godmother threatens to take away his own "Happily Ever After" if he does not listen to her. After hearing that Charming is the Fairy Godmother's son, the trio is noticed by the Fairy Godmother, who has them arrested by the royal guards and thrown into a dungeon. When the royal ball begins, several of Shrek's friends band together to free the trio (having seen their arrest via the Magic Mirror) and help Shrek stop the kiss. The Muffin Man helps them create a gigantic gingerbread man (named Mongo), who breaks through the castle's defences, then falls into the moat and dies. When Shrek arrives, Charming forcibly kisses Fiona, believing the potion has taken effect, but Fiona temporarily knocks him out with a headbutt. When the Fairy Godmother confronts Harold, he reveals that he drank the potion himself at the last minute, having realized Fiona's love for Shrek. The Fairy Godmother tries to kill Shrek, but Harold sacrifices himself to save the couple. The spell reflects off his armor and vanquishes the Fairy Godmother into a cloud of bubbles; it also reverts Harold to his true form, that of the Frog Prince. Harold apologizes to Shrek and Fiona for everything he has done, and now realizes what is best for Fiona, giving them his blessing. Shrek forgives him, and Lillian tells Harold that she still loves him no matter what. When it is midnight, Shrek tells Fiona that if they kiss now, then their change will be permanent. But Fiona says that she wants what any other princess wants: to live happily ever after with the ogre she married. The clock chimes as the potion's effects wear off, with Donkey changing back as well, much to his chagrin. He cheers up as Shrek reassures him he still is a noble steed in his eyes. Finally, Puss and Donkey sing as the royal ball resumes celebrating the true newlyweds. In a post-credits scene, Donkey complains to Puss about missing Dragon, and rejects his invitation to a night-cap at the "Kit-Kat Club." Suddenly, Dragon flies in, along with six "Dronkeys" that Donkey happily embraces as his "mutant babies," and Donkey and Dragon reconcile. Having a larger family, Donkey realizes, "I've gotta get a job!" Like its predecessor, Shrek 2 also acts as somewhat of a parody film, targeting adapted children's fantasies (mainly those adapted by Disney); and like other DreamWorks animated films, also features references to American popular culture: In July 2001, it was reported that the main cast of the original Shrek were set for huge paychecks for voicing a sequel to the movie. Following a successful collaboration with the original film, Eddie Murphy had signed a two-year, first-look production deal with DreamWorks, where he also signed writer-director Todd Field to a two-year deal. The film was produced with a US$70 million budget. The screenwriters for the first film, Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio, insisted the movie to be a traditional fairytale, but after disagreements with the producers, they left the project and was taken over by director Andrew Adamson. His writing of the film was inspired from Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, with the help of the co-directors for the film, who had spent most of the film's production in Northern California while Adamson spent most of the time with the voice actors in Glendale, California. DreamWorks began production of the film in 2001, which was actually before the first film was even completed. DreamWorks made sure there was something new to see in Shrek 2 by putting more human characters in the film than there were in its predecessor and improving their appearance, with the use of a few systems that dealt with hair and fur to improve its appearance and movement. The set up for all the characters was done in the first 3 years of production. Puss in Boots required a whole new set of tools in the film to handle his fur, belt and feather plume in his hat. The character also required an upgrade in the fur shader for his introduction in the film. According to production designer Guillaume Aretos, Shrek 2 appeared to be a lot darker than the original film; "There are a lot of medieval paintings and illustrations that we used quite a bit also. Other than that there are my own influences, which are classical paintings from the 15th and 16th centuries, but those are not as direct. In fact, nothing was absolutely direct. The design of Shrek is always a twist on reality anyway, so we tried to [pack] as much detail and interest as we could in the imagery.” Singer and songwriter Adam Duritz from Counting Crows said that his band's song, "Accidentally in Love", "fits into the movie because it's the story of people who fall in love who weren't supposed to fall in love." Composer Harry Gregson Williams operated the sound of the score on different levels which Harry said as "Fun". His score came out as an Eels song into a very romantic scene with Shrek and Fiona, or a funny scene with donkey. John Powell had been left out to compose the score for the film with Williams due to a conflict. In April 2004, the film was selected for competition at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival. Shrek 2 was originally going to release on June 18, 2004. The film then planned to release on May 21, 2004. Though, Shrek 2 released on May 19, 2004 (two days before). A day before the film went to theaters, the first five minutes were shown on Nickelodeon's U-Pick Live. It was the first film with over 4,000 theaters in overall count; over 3,700 theaters was its count for an opening day. Spider-Man 2 was the first film with over 4,000 theaters for an opening day and second for overall counts. When the film was released on DVD on November 5, 2004, it was the second Shrek film to be presented in its original ratio of 1.85:1 on the Region 1 anamorphic widescreen DVD. Shrek 2 was released on VHS and DVD on November 5, 2004 and on Game Boy Advance Video on November 17, 2005. A 3D-converted version of the film was released exclusively with select Samsung television sets on Blu-ray on December 1, 2010, along with the other three films of the series. A non-3D version was released on December 7, 2010, as part of Shrek: The Whole Story, and a stand-alone Blu-ray/DVD combo pack was released individually on August 30, 2011, along with the other two films of the series. A stand-alone 3D Blu-ray version of the film was released on November 1, 2011. Far Far Away Idol is an extra on the DVD and VHS release based on American Idol and guest starring Simon Cowell. Taking place right after Shrek 2 ends, the characters from Shrek compete in singing popular songs while being judged by Shrek, Fiona and Cowell. After the performances, on the DVD release, the viewer gets to pick the winner. However, if any character outside of Shrek (along with Princess Fiona), Donkey, or Puss were selected, Cowell would refuse to accept the winner and proclaim himself the victor, leaping onto a table and performing his "own" rendition of "My Way". At the end of the VHS release, it gives a link to a website where the viewer can vote for his favourite to determine the ultimate winner. DreamWorks Animation announced on November 8, 2004, three days after the DVD and VHS release, that after over 750 thousand votes cast, the winner of the competition was Doris. The film opened at #1 with a Friday-to-Sunday total of $108,037,878, and a total of $128,983,060 since its Wednesday launch, from a then-record 4,163 theaters, for an average of $25,952 per theater over the weekend. At the time Shrek 2s Friday-to-Sunday total was the second-highest opening weekend trailing only Spider-Mans $114,844,116. In addition, Saturday alone managed to obtain $44,797,042, making it the highest single day gross at the time, beating Spider-Mans first Saturday gross of $43,622,264. It also ranked #1 in its second weekend, grossing $95,578,365 over the 4-day Memorial Day weekend, narrowly beating out the $85,807,341 4-day tally of new opener The Day After Tomorrow. The film spent a total of 10 weeks in the weekly top 10 remaining there until Thursday July 29, 2004, and stayed in theaters for 149 days (roughly 21 weeks), closing on November 25, 2004. The film grossed $441,226,247 domestically (US and Canada), and $478,612,511 in foreign markets, making a total of $919,838,758 worldwide, making it the highest-grossing film of both 2004 and in its franchise. This also puts the film at 8th on the all time domestic box office list and 26th on the worldwide box office list. The movie also took away the highest worldwide gross made by an animated feature which before held by Finding Nemo, although the latter still had a higher overseas-only gross. With DVD sales and Shrek 2 merchandise are estimated to total almost $800 million, the film (which was produced with a budget of $150 million) is DreamWorks' most profitable film to date. In August 2010, Disney and Pixar's Toy Story 3 surpassed Shrek 2 to become the highest-grossing animated film worldwide ($1.063 billion), but Shrek 2 still holds the record for the highest-grossing animated film at the American and Canadian box office as well as the highest-grossing animated PG-rated film at this box office. Disney's 3D re-releases of The Lion King (in 2011) and Finding Nemo (in 2012), respectively, surpassed Shrek 2 and relegated it as the 4th highest-grossing animated film of all time. The film was well received by a number of critics, many rating it as good as its predecessor, and some rated it even better. Based on reviews collected from 209 critics by the film review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, 89% gave Shrek 2 a positive review. On Metacritic, the film has a weighted average rating of 75 out of 100 based on 40 professional reviews published in newspapers, magazines and in highly regarded Internet sites, which indicates "generally favorable reviews." Roger Ebert gave it three out of four stars saying it's "bright, lively, and entertaining," while Robert Denerstein of Denver Rocky Mountain News called it "Sharply funny." James Kendrick praised the plot, who called it "familiar, but funny." In contrast to the praise it received, even in some positive reviews, some critics said that the film wasn't as good as the original film. Peter Rainer of New York Magazine stated the film "manages to undo much of what made its predecessor such a computer-generated joy ride." Shrek 2 won five People's Choice Awards: Favorite Animated Movie, Favorite Animated Movie Star for "Donkey" (Eddie Murphy), Favorite Movie Comedy, and Favorite Movie Villain for "Fairy Godmother" (Jennifer Saunders), and Favorite Sequel. It also won two Teen Choice Awards: Choice Movie: Animated/Computer Generated and Choice Award Choice Movie - Comedy. The film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, but lost to The Incredibles. One of the film's songs, "Accidentally in Love" received nominations for the Academy Award for Best Original Song, Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song, and the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media. The American Film Institute nominated Shrek 2 for its Top 10 Animated Films list. Shrek 2 has two sequels including Shrek the Third and Shrek Forever After. A spin-off film Puss in Boots was released on October 28, 2011, and focuses on the character of Puss in Boots, who was introduced in this film.
The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, commonly referred to as Eclipse, is a 2010 American romantic fantasy film based on Stephenie Meyer's 2007 novel Eclipse. It is the third installment of film seriesThe Twilight Saga, following 2008's Twilight and 2009's New Moon. Summit Entertainment greenlit the film in February 2009. Directed by David Slade, the film stars Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson, and Taylor Lautner, reprising their roles as Bella Swan, Edward Cullen, and Jacob Black, respectively. Melissa Rosenberg, who penned the scripts for both Twilight and New Moon, returned as screenwriter. Filming began on August 17, 2009, at Vancouver Film Studios, and finished in late October, with post-production began early the following month. Bryce Dallas Howard was cast as Victoria, replacing Rachelle Lefevre who previously played her. The film was released worldwide on June 30, 2010 in theatres, and became the first Twilight film to be released in IMAX. The film has received a mixed to positive reception from critics and its fans. It held the record for biggest midnight opening in the United States and Canada in box office history, grossing an estimated $30 million, until it was surpassed by Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2 in 2011. The film then scored the biggest Wednesday opening in the United States and Canada history with $68,533,840 beating Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen's $62 million. Eclipse has also become the film with the widest independent release, playing in over 4,416 theaters, surpassing its predecessor, The Twilight Saga: New Moon, which held the record since November 2009. In Seattle, not far from Forks, Victoria (Bryce Dallas Howard) attacks and bites Riley Biers (Xavier Samuel), in order to begin creating an army of newborns with him. Back in Forks, Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson) and Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) discuss the complications of becoming an immortal vampire. At 18 years old, one year older than the age Edward was when he became a vampire, Bella expresses her aversion to the idea of marrying so young, though Edward refuses to turn her into a vampire until they are married, his argument that she should have various human experiences she would otherwise miss. While Charlie Swan (Billy Burke) investigates the disappearance of Riley Biers, Edward suspects his disappearance was caused by the newborn vampires. Furthering his suspicions is Riley's intrusion into Bella's room. Although Edward fears for her safety, Bella insists that Jacob Black (Taylor Lautner) and the rest of the werewolf pack would never harm her, but Edward is still not convinced. Bella goes to La Push to see Jacob, and returns home unharmed. During one of her visits, Jacob confesses that he is in love with Bella, and forcefully kisses her. Furious, she punches him and sprains her hand, and Edward later threatens Jacob and tells him to only kiss her if she asks him to. Bella even revokes the invitations of Jacob and his pack members to her graduation party, but when Jacob apologizes for his behavior, she forgives him. Meanwhile, Alice (Ashley Greene) sees a vision that the newborn army is attacking Forks led by Riley Biers. Jacob, accompanied by Quil (Tyson Houseman) and Embry (Kiowa Gordon) overhear this, which leads to an alliance between the Cullens and Wolf pack. Later, the Cullens and the wolves agree to a meeting place and time to train and discuss strategy. During the training Jasper (Jackson Rathbone) explains to Bella that he was created by a vampire named Maria to control a newborn army. He hated his original existence and upon meeting Alice, joined the Cullens with her. Bella sees the true bond between a mated vampire pair and begins to understand Jasper better. Despite her reluctance to marry, Bella realizes that spending eternity with Edward is more important to her than anything else and agrees to marry him. Edward and Bella camp up in the mountains to hide Bella from the bloodthirsty newborns. During the night, Bella overhears a conversation between Edward and Jacob, in which they temporarily put aside their hatred towards each other. In the morning, Jacob overhears Edward and Bella discussing their engagement and storms off, angrily. Bella desperately asks him to kiss her, and she realizes that she has fallen in love with him. Edward finds out about the kiss but is not upset, as Bella says she loves him more than Jacob. When Victoria appears, Edward kills her while Seth kills Riley. The Cullens and the Quileute wolves, meanwhile, destroy her "army", though Jacob is injured saving Leah Clearwater from a newborn. Several members of the vampire police, the Volturi, arrive to deal with the newborn army. They also see that the Cullens are guarding the newborn, Bree Tanner (Jodelle Ferland), who had refused to fight and surrendered to Carlisle. Jane (Dakota Fanning) tortures Bree to get information, then instructs Felix to kill her, despite the Cullens' efforts to spare her. When Jane notes that Caius will find it interesting that Bella is still human, Bella informs her that the date for her transformation has been set. Bella visits the injured Jacob to tell him that even though she is in love with him, she has chosen to be with Edward. Saddened by her choice, Jacob reluctantly agrees to stop trying to come between her and Edward. Bella and Edward go to their meadow, where she tells him she has decided to do things his way: get married, make love, then be transformed into a vampire. She also explains that she never has been normal and never will be; she's felt out of place her entire life, but when she is in Edward's world she feels stronger and complete. At the end of the story they decide they need to tell Charlie about their engagement. In early November 2008, Summit announced that they had attained the rights to the remaining books in Stephenie Meyer's seriesTwilight: New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn. In February 2009, Summit confirmed that they would begin working on The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. On the same day, it was announced that since New Moon director Chris Weitz would be in post-production for New Moon when Eclipse began shooting, he would not be directing the third film. Instead, the film would be helmed by director David Slade, with Melissa Rosenberg returning as screenwriter. David Slade dove right into the project, interviewing cast members individually between two and three times to discuss characters and the plot. Summit Entertainment revealed that they would replace Rachelle Lefevre, who played an evil vampire named Victoria, with Bryce Dallas Howard in late July 2009. They attributed the change to scheduling conflicts, and Lefevre responded by saying she was "stunned" and "greatly saddened" by the decision. Howard had previously rejected the role of Victoria as "too small of a part" when she was approached to play her in Twilight. Silent Hill's Jodelle Ferland was cast as the newly turned vampire, Bree Tanner. Other new cast members include Xavier Samuel as Riley, Jack Huston as Royce King II, Catalina Sandino Moreno as Maria, Julia Jones as Leah Clearwater, and Boo Boo Stewart as Seth Clearwater. Actors who auditioned for the various roles were not given a script to work from. Instead, actress Kirsten Prout mentioned, "they made the scenes exact transcripts from the book.... They didn't give the screenplay out. So, the audition side was just reading a page of Twilight and reading the lines that were interspersed between the descriptions." Principal photography for Eclipse began on August 17, 2009, at Vancouver Film Studios. On August 29, photos captured Kristen Stewart, Billy Burke, and other principal actors, filming a scene with graduation caps and gowns. September 2 brought Xavier Samuel together with Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson filming at a soundstage for scenes at Bella's house. Director David Slade stated that they filmed a scene with a tent on September 13. He also said on his Twitter account that they filmed a kiss between Jacob and Bella on September 17. Filming wrapped up on October 29, 2009, while post-production began in late November. Slade published multiple updates on his Twitter account proclaiming that editing was going well. He said the "story and the way [they] approached the film calls for a more realistic approach." In April 2010, it was revealed that reshoots to the film were needed. Both Slade and Stephenie Meyer were present at the shoot along with the three main stars. In January 2010, an early draft of the film's script was leaked on the Internet. The script presumably belonged to star Jackson Rathbone, as his name was watermarked across each page. The score for The Twilight Saga: Eclipse was composed by Howard Shore, who composed the scores for such films as trilogyThe Lord of the Rings and The Aviator. The film's soundtrack was released on June 8, 2010, by Atlantic Records in conjunction with music supervisor Alexandra Patsavas' Chop Shop label. The lead single from the soundtrack is "Neutron Star Collision (Love Is Forever)", performed by the British band Muse. On May 11, 2010, MySpace announced that the full Eclipse soundtrack listing would be unveiled starting at 8 a.m. the following morning every half-hour, totaling six hours. The album debuted at #2 on Billboard 200. On November 5, 2009, the American Film Market revealed the first poster for Eclipse. In late February 2010, Summit Entertainment announced that the first trailer would be attached to the studio's own film, Remember Me, which also stars Robert Pattinson. On March 10, 2010, a 10-second preview of the trailer was released online, followed by the release of the full trailer the next day. The trailer's release coincided with the launching of the film's official website. On March 19, 2010, The Twilight Saga: New Moon was released on DVD and Blu-ray; the Walmart Ultimate Fan Edition includes a 7-minute first look at Eclipse. On March 23, the second poster for the film was released. The final Eclipse trailer debuted on The Oprah Winfrey Show, and in promotion for the movie, Robert Pattinson, Kristen Stewart, Taylor Lautner, and Dakota Fanning made a guest appearance on the show May 13; the audience also viewed a version of the film. On June 6, 2010, a sneak peek of the film was shown at the 2010 MTV Movie Awards; that same week, more clips and TV spots were released also. In order to tie in the lunar eclipse on June 26, 2010, Summit Entertainment hosted screenings of the first two films in film seriesThe Twilight Saga in twelve cities throughout the United States. The event was streamed live from Philadelphia and San Diego, and included cast member appearances and special previews of Eclipse. Nordstrom and Summit Entertainment joined together to sell a fashion collection inspired by the film, as was done for the previous installment. Created by Awake Inc., the collection is based on Ashley Greene's character, Alice, and Kristen Stewart's character, Bella. The Eclipse collection became available on June 4, 2010. In a similar style to its New Moon marketing, Burger King started promoting the film on Monday, June 21, 2010. Their promotion heavily focuses on the "Team Jacob vs. Team Edward" aspect of the film. Tickets for Eclipse went on sale on various online movie ticket sellers on Friday, May 14, 2010. The official red carpet premiere for the film was held on June 24, 2010, at the Los Angeles Nokia Theatre. Fans had the option of lining up starting on June 21, 2010, at the Nokia Plaza in Los Angeles before changing location on June 23. An official United Kingdom premiere was held in Leicester Square, London on July 1, 2010. However, Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner were not present. Eclipse opened in 4,416 theaters and 193 IMAX screens. With that, early predictions forecasted the film will gross anywhere from $150 million to $180 million within its first six days of release, putting the previous installment, The Twilight Saga: New Moon's $142 million within its first three days, in danger of being broken. Eclipse accounted for 82 percent of Fandango's online ticket sales, and has remained in the top five since May 14, 2010. MovieTickets.com also states that Eclipse is the top advance ticket seller on its site, with more than 50 percent of daily ticket sales. The film is the top advance ticket seller for 2010. Also the film showed an early trailer for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1. Early ticket sales for the film also have broken records for Gold Class Cinemas, where more than 8,500 Twilight fans have reserved tickets; the Fairview, TX location sold out their showings of Eclipse for June 30. The film was re-released into theaters on September 13, 2010 as a celebration of lead character Bella Swan's birthday. The Twilight Saga: Eclipse was released on DVD in the United States on December 4, 2010. The Two Disc Special Edition DVD and Blu-ray discs include special features such as: eight deleted and extended scenes, music videos by Muse and Metric from The Twilight Saga: Eclipse: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack and commentaries by Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson, Stephenie Meyer and Wyck Geoffery. It was released on December 1, 2010 in New Zealand and Australia. There is also a "gift set" Two-Disc Collector's Edition which features a unique packaging and 6 collectible photo cards. In North American DVD sales, the film has currently grossed $164,676,695 and has sold more than 9,424,505 units. Eclipse set a new record for the biggest midnight opening in the United States and Canada in box office history, grossing an estimated $30.1 million in over 4,000 theaters. The record was formerly held by the previous film, The Twilight Saga: New Moon, with $26.3 million in 3,514 theaters. It held the record until the summer of 2011, when it was broken by Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2, which made $43.5 million. Eclipse also had the highest midnight gross of the franchise until it was topped in November 2011 by its successor, The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1 ($30.3 million). The movie also surpassed Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen in total grosses for a midnight screening in IMAX. Eclipse garnered more than $1 million at 192 theaters, while Revenge of the Fallen earned $959,000, until it was beaten five months later by Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1 with $1.4 million. The film grossed $68.5 million on its opening day in the United States and Canada, becoming the biggest single-day Wednesday opening over Revenge of the Fallen's $62 million, and the third biggest single-day opening ever at the time. As of 2011, the film has the third highest opening day gross of the series behind New Moon ($72.7 million) and Breaking Dawn - Part 1 ($72.0 million). Furthermore, the film earned $9 million at various IMAX locations during its first week. After six days of release in the U.S.A. and Canada, the film ended Independence Day with a total of $176.4 million, including $64.8 million during its first weekend. In its second weekend, the film fell 51%, a better standing than its predecessors, grossing an estimated $31.7 million. The film opened overseas with $16.2 million, beating records set by the film's predecessor in Russia with an estimated $3.9 million (since surpassed by Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides which earned $5 million), in Italy with an estimated $3.1 million, in the Philippines, grossing $1.2 million, and in Belgium, where it grossed an estimated $1.1 million. It is the third-best opening day ever in Italy; in the Philippines, Eclipse topped Spider-Man 3 for best opening day ever, and was the highest opening day ever in Belgium. In three days, Eclipse topped the box office with $121.3 million and during its first weekend it earned $71.3 million. Overseas in its second weekend, the film grossed $70.6 million from 9,440 screens in 63 markets, a 1% drop from its first weekend. The film opened in the United Kingdom at number one, grossing $20.7 million from 523 locations (including previews), the market's biggest opening of 2010 (until Toy Story 3 surpassed it) and about $1.7 million more than The Twilight Saga: New Moon grossed in its opening weekend in November 2009. The film also debuted at number one in France, grossing $13.3 million, which marks the third-largest opening in the country for a 2010 film (behind Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1's ($20.7 million) and Alice in Wonderland's ($15.4 million). The film opened at number one in South Korea with $4.9 million. The film ended its box-office run in the U.S.A. and Canada on October 21, 2010 having grossed $300,531,751, surpassing its predecessor The Twilight Saga: New Moon which grossed $296,623,634 a few months before, to become the highest-grossing film of the franchise and the highest-grossing romantic fantasy, werewolf and vampire movie of all time at the American and Canadian box office. It is the fourth movie of 2010 to reach $300 million and ranks 36th on the all-time chart in the U.S.A. and Canada. Compared to its predecessor overseas, it has grossed $393,047,815 against New Moon's $413,203,156. Therefore, internationally, Eclipse remains the second highest-grossing film in the franchise with $693,579,566 against New Moon's $709,826,790. Eclipse's highest-grossing markets except the U.S.A. and Canada are the UK, Ireland and Malta ($45,709,785), Germany ($33,087,955), France and the Maghreb region ($32,987,421), Italy ($19,984,000), Brazil ($30,499,010) and Australia ($28,566,737). Reviews for the film were mixed, but more favorable than New Moon. Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives the film a score of 49% based on 229 reviews. The site's general consensus is that, "Stuffed with characters and overly reliant on uninspired dialogue, Eclipse won't win The Twilight Saga many new converts, despite an improved blend of romance and action fantasy." Review aggregation website Metacritic, which assigns a weighted mean rating out of 100 reviews from film critics, the film holds a rating score of 58/100 based on 38 reviews, indicating "mixed or average reviews". The Hollywood Reporter posted a positive review of Eclipse, saying the film "nails it". Peter Debruge of Variety reports that the film "finally feels more like the blockbuster this top-earning franchise deserves". Rick Bentley of McClatchy Newspapers stated the film was the best in The Twilight Saga so far, suggesting that, "The person who should be worried is Bill Condon, the director tapped for the two-part finale, Breaking Dawn. He's got a real challenge to make movies as good as Eclipse." The New York Times praised David Slade's ability to make an entertaining film, calling it funny and better than its predecessors, but wrote that the acting has not improved much. Giving the film 4.5 out of 5 stars, Betsey Sharkey from The Los Angeles Times praised David Slade's method of blending his previous works to form a funny movie. She stated, "Eclipse eclipse[s] its predecessors." The film was also listed in 49th place by Moviefone on its list of the 50 best movies of 2010. Roger Moore of the Orlando Sentinel gave the film 2.5 out of 4 stars, stating, "The dullness of the performances really stands out when somebody like Bryce Dallas Howard, or Anna Kendrick turn up and liven up their scenes." While calling the film "too chatty and too long", he did compliment David Slade's directing and noted that the movie will please the fans. Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune gave the film 2 out of 5 stars, stating that David Slade's pacing is "everything like molasses running uphill". He also criticized the characters, the actors portraying them, the big close-ups of hand-held devices, and called Howard Shore's score "gunk". Wesley Morris from the Boston Globe stated, "If the first two movies were "get a room," part three is "get a therapist". He said the second and third film "repeat that discovery [in Twilight] without truly deepening it...the movies are interesting without ever being good." A mixed review said that while "Eclipse restores some of the energy New Moon zapped out of the franchise and has enough quality performances to keep it involving", the film "isn't quite the adrenaline-charged game-changer for love story haters that its marketing might lead you to believe. The majority of the 'action' remains protracted and not especially scintillating should-we-or-shouldn't-we conversations between the central triangle." Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun Times gave the film a more positive review than for the first two films in the saga, but still felt the movie was a constant, unclever conversation between the three main characters. He criticized the "gazes" both Edward and Jacob give Bella throughout the movie, and noted that the mountain range that appears in the film looks "like landscapes painted by that guy on TV who shows you how to paint stuff like that." He also predicted that a lack of understanding for the film series in general would not bode well with the audience, stating, "I doubt anyone not intimately familiar with the earlier installments could make head or tails of the opening scenes." He gave the film 2 stars out of 4. Steve Persall of the St. Peterburg Times called the movie "just monstrously bad", and said, "Eclipse leaves the sputtering story arc in idle, with only an uneasy truce between the vampire and werewolf clans amounting to anything new" and rating it grade C-. The Guardian's columnist Peter Bradshaw gave the film a one-star rating in a review that lampooned Bella's continued abstinence, among other plot elements. Bradshaw, dubbing the series "The epic of the unbroken duck", wrote that "Bella Swan is starting to make Doris Day look like the nympho from hell", and concluded that "it could be time to sharpen the wooden stake." Summit Entertainment announced in November 2008 that they had obtained the rights to the fourth book in the Twilight series, Breaking Dawn and greenlit a two film adaptation in April 2010. The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1 was released on November 18, 2011 and Part 2 on November 16, 2012 with Bill Condon directing, and author Stephenie Meyer co-producing.
Toy Story 3 is a 2010 American 3D computer-animated family comedy-drama film, and the third installment in the Toy Story series. It was produced by Pixar Animation Studios and distributed by Walt Disney Pictures. Directed by Lee Unkrich, the film was released worldwide from June through October in Disney Digital 3-D, RealD, and IMAX 3D. Toy Story 3 was also the first film to be released theatrically with Dolby Surround 7.1 sound. The screenplay was written by Michael Arndt, while Unkrich wrote the story along with John Lasseter and Andrew Stanton, respectively director and co-writer of the two first films. The plot focuses on the toys Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and their friends dealing with an uncertain future as their owner, Andy, prepares to leave for college. Actors Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Don Rickles, Estelle Harris, John Ratzenberger, Wallace Shawn, Jeff Pidgeon, Jodi Benson, R. Lee Ermey, John Morris, and Laurie Metcalf reprised their voice-over roles from the previous films. Jim Varney, who played Slinky Dog in the first two films, and Joe Ranft, who portrayed Lenny and Wheezy, both died before production began on Toy Story 3. The role of Slinky Dog was taken over by Blake Clark (a friend of Varney), while Ranft's characters and various others were written out of the story. New characters include performances by Ned Beatty, Timothy Dalton, Kristen Schaal, Bonnie Hunt, Whoopi Goldberg, Jeff Garlin, Richard Kind, and Michael Keaton. The feature broke Shrek the Thirds record as the biggest opening day North American gross for an animated film unadjusted for inflation, and had a big opening weekend with an unadjusted gross of $110,307,189. It is also the highest-grossing opening weekend for a Pixar film, and was previously the highest-grossing opening weekend for a film to have opened in the month of June (surpassed by Man of Steel). This is the highest-grossing film of 2010, both in the United States and Canada, and worldwide. In early August, it became Pixar's highest-grossing film at the North American box office (surpassing Finding Nemo), and the highest-grossing animated film of all time worldwide (surpassing Shrek 2); later that month, Toy Story 3 became the first ever animated film in history to make over $1 billion worldwide. It is currently the 11th-highest-grossing film of all time. Toy Story 3 was nominated for five Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Sound Editing. It was the third animated film (after Beauty and the Beast and Up) to be nominated for Academy Award for Best Picture. It won the awards for Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song. Andy, now nearly 18 years old, is leaving for college, and his toys have not been played with in years. Andy decides to take Woody with him to college and puts Buzz Lightyear and the rest of the toys in a trash bag for storage in the attic. Andy's mother mistakes the bag for garbage and puts it on the curb. The toys escape and, believing Andy intended to throw them away, decide to climb in a donation box bound for Sunnyside Daycare. Woody follows the other toys and tries to explain that they were thrown out by mistake, but they refuse to believe him. Andy's toys are welcomed by the many toys at Sunnyside and given a tour of the seemingly perfect play-setting by Lots-O'-Huggin' Bear (simply known as Lotso), Big Baby, and Ken, whom Barbie falls in love with. All of the toys love their new home, and Woody leaves alone in an attempt to return to Andy. Woody's escape attempt falls short and he is found by Bonnie, one of the Sunnyside children. She takes him home and plays with him along with her other toys, who are well-treated, happy, and readily welcome Woody. At the daycare, meanwhile, a group of toddlers play with Andy's toys very roughly. Buzz asks Lotso to move him and the others to the older children's room, only to be captured by Lotso's henchmen. Lotso, who controls Sunnyside with an iron fist, reveals that he sends new toys to distract Sunnyside's younger children to keep him and his henchmen safe, not caring whether the other toys get broken in the process. Seeing promise in Buzz, he resets him to his original space ranger persona. At the same time, Mrs Potato Head sees Andy searching for them through her missing eye left behind in Andy's room, which convinces the toys that Woody was right about Andy. Before they can leave, they are imprisoned by Lotso, his gang and the reset Buzz. Woody learns from a toy clown named Chuckles that he, Lotso, and Big Baby once had a beloved owner named Daisy. When Daisy one day lost Lotso, Big Baby and Chuckles, they eventually found their way back to Daisy's house, only to find that she replaced Lotso with an identical teddy bear, since then, Lotso no longer cares for children. When he found Sunnyside, he and Big Baby took it over and ran it like a prison. The following morning, Woody returns to Sunnyside through Bonnie's backpack and apologizes to his friends. That night, the toys execute a daring escape plan, and in the process they accidentally reset Buzz into a delusional Spanish mode, in which his memory remains wiped but he becomes flamboyantly chivalrous; despite this, Buzz allies himself with Woody and immediately falls in love with Jessie. The toys reach a dumpster, but are caught by Lotso and his gang. As a garbage truck approaches, Woody reveals what he learned about Lotso. Lotso reveals that he now believes that toys are meant to be thrown away; leading to an enraged Big Baby to throw Lotso into the dumpster. Seeking revenge, Lotso pulls Woody into the dumpster just as the truck collects the trash. Woody's friends fall into the back of the truck trying to rescue him and a falling television hits Buzz when he saves Jessie, returning him to his normal self. The toys find themselves at the dump and eventually wind up on a conveyor belt leading to a giant incinerator. Woody and Buzz then help Lotso—whom they saved earlier—reach an emergency stop button, only to have Lotso abandon them. Believing the end is near, the toys join hands and accept their fate, but are soon rescued by the Aliens operating a large industrial claw. Lotso makes his way outside, but a passing garbage truck driver finds him, recognizing he had the same toy as a kid, straps him to the radiator grill of his truck. Meanwhile, Woody and his friends board another garbage truck driven by an adult Sid Phillips back to Andy's house. In Andy's room, Woody climbs back into the box with Andy's college supplies while the other toys ready themselves for the attic. Woody instead leaves a note for Andy on the toys' box. Andy, thinking the note is from his mother, takes them to Bonnie's house and introduces her to his old toys. Bonnie recognizes Woody who, to Andy's surprise, is lying at the bottom of the box. Though initially reluctant, Andy passes him on to Bonnie, and then spends some time playing with her and the toys before leaving. The film ends with Woody and his friends watching Andy's departure and beginning their new lives with Bonnie. During the credits, Woody and the other toys learn through notes passed on in Bonnie's backpack that Barbie, Ken and Big Baby have improved the lives of the toys at Sunnyside. Several other characters (such as Bo Peep, RC, Etch and Wheezy) are only seen in flashbacks. The character of Slinky Dog appeared to be in limbo after the death of his original voice actor Jim Varney on February 10, 2000, three months after Toy Story 2 was released. Varney was replaced by Blake Clark. After Clark was cast to play Slinky Dog, the producers later realized that Clark and Varney had coincidentally been close friends since they appeared in the 1989 film Fast Food, making the transition a lot easier. According to the terms of Pixar's revised deal with Disney, all characters created by Pixar for their films were owned by Disney. Furthermore, Disney retains the rights to make sequels to any Pixar film, though Pixar retained the right of first refusal to work on these sequels. But in 2004, when the contentious negotiations between the two companies made a split appear likely, Disney Chairman at the time Michael Eisner put in motion plans to produce Toy Story 3 at a new Disney studio, Circle 7 Animation. Tim Allen, the voice of Buzz Lightyear, indicated a willingness to return even if Pixar was not on board. Jim Herzfeld wrote a script for Circle 7's version of the film. It focused on the other toys shipping a malfunctioning Buzz to Taiwan, where he was built, believing that he will be fixed there. While searching on the Internet, they find out that many more Buzz Lightyear toys are malfunctioning around the world and the company has issued a massive recall. Fearing Buzz's destruction, a group of Andy's toys (Woody, Rex, Slinky, Mr. Potato Head, Hamm, Jessie, and Bullseye) venture to rescue Buzz. At the same time, Buzz meets other toys from around the world that were once loved, but have now been recalled. In January 2006, Disney bought Pixar in a deal that put Pixar chiefs Edwin Catmull and John Lasseter in charge of all Disney Animation. Shortly thereafter, Circle 7 Animation was shut down and its version of Toy Story 3 was cancelled. The character designs went into the Disney archives. The following month, Disney CEO Robert Iger confirmed that Disney was in the process of transferring the production to Pixar. John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, and Lee Unkrich visited the house where they first pitched Toy Story and came up with the story for the film over a weekend. Stanton then wrote a treatment. On February 8, 2007, Catmull announced Toy Story 2s co-director, Lee Unkrich, as the sole director of the film instead of John Lasseter (who was busy directing Cars 2), and Michael Arndt as screenwriter. The release date was moved to 2010. Unkrich said that he felt pressure to avoid creating "the first dud" for Pixar, since as of 2010 all of Pixar's films had been critical and commercial successes. During the initial development stages of the film, Pixar revisited their work from the original Toy Story and found that although they could open the old computer files for the animated 3D models, error messages prevented them from editing the files. This necessitated recreating the models from scratch. To create the chaotic and complex junkyard scene near the film's end, more than a year and a half was invested on research and development to create the simulation systems required for the sequence. Instead of sending Tom Hanks, Tim Allen and John Ratzenberger scripts for their consideration in reprising their roles, a complete story reel of the film was shown to the actors in a theater. The reel was made up of moving storyboards with pre-recorded voices, sound effects, and music. At the conclusion of the preview, the actors signed on to the film. Dolby Laboratories announced that Toy Story 3 would be the first film that will feature theatrical 7.1 surround sound. Thus, even the Blu-ray version will feature original 7.1 audio, unlike other movies which were remixed into 7.1 for Blu-ray. The film's first teaser trailer was released with Up in Disney Digital 3-D, on May 29, 2009. On October 2, 2009, Toy Story and Toy Story 2 were re-released as a double feature in Disney Digital 3-D. The first full-length trailer was attached as an exclusive sneak peek and a first footage to the Toy Story double feature, on October 12, 2009. A second teaser was released on February 10, 2010, followed by a second full-length trailer on February 11 and appeared in 3D showings of Alice in Wonderland and How to Train Your Dragon. On March 23, 2010, Toy Story was released on Blu-ray/DVD combo pack which included a small feature of "The Story of Toy Story 3." Also, Toy Story 2 was released on that day in the same format which had a small feature on the "Characters of Toy Story 3." On May 11, 2010, both films had a DVD-only re-release which contained the features. Mattel, Thinkway Toys, and Lego are among those who produced toys to promote the film. Fisher Price, a Mattel Company, has released Toy Story 3 with 21 3D images for viewing with the View-Master viewer. Disney Interactive Studios also produced a video game based on the film, Toy Story 3: The Video Game, which was released for Microsoft Windows, Xbox 360, Wii, PlayStation 3, Nintendo DS, and PSP on June 15, 2010. A PlayStation 2 version was released on October 30, 2010 as part of a PS2 Bundle and separately on November 2, 2010 (The same day Toy Story 3 was released on DVD and Blu-ray). It was also the last Disney/Pixar game to be released on PlayStation 2. Toy Story 3 was featured in Apple's iPhone OS 4 Event on April 8, 2010, with Steve Jobs demonstrating a Toy Story 3 themed iAd written in HTML5. Pixar designed a commercial for the toy, Lots-O'-Huggin' Bear, and formatted it to look like it came from an old VCR recording. The recording was altered with distorted sound, noise along the bottom of the screen, and flickering video, all designed to make it look like a converted recording from around 1983. A Japanese version of the commercial was also released online, with the name Lots-O'-Huggin Bear being replaced by Little Hug-Hug Bear (Japanese:ハグハグベアちゃん/Hagu Hagu Beya-Chan). On Dancing with the Stars May 11, 2010, episode, the Gipsy Kings performed a Spanish-language version of the song "You've Got a Friend in Me." It also featured a paso doble dance which was choreographed by Cheryl Burke and Tony Dovolani. Both the song and dance are featured in the film. Toy Story 3 was also promoted with airings of the first and second films on several channels in the upcoming weeks of the film's release, including Disney Channel, Disney XD, and ABC Family. Sneak peeks of Toy Story 3 were also revealed, primarily on Disney Channel. Unlike most recent Oscar campaigns, Toy Story 3s "Not since..." campaign drew a lot of attention during the holiday period, emphasizing on the film's uniqueness and tremendous critical acclaim. The theatrical release of Toy Story 3 included the short film Day & Night, which focuses on what happens when an animated personification of Day meets his opposite, Night and the resulting growth for both. It was also included in the Blu-ray and DVD release of the film (See Home media for more). Toy Story 3 was released in North America on November 2, 2010 in a standard DVD edition, two-disc Blu-ray and in a four-disc Blu-ray/DVD/Digital Copy combo pack. Behind the scenes are featured including a sneak peek teaser for the upcoming Cars 2, the sequel to Cars. A 10-disc Toy Story trilogy Blu-ray box set also arrived on store shelves on the same day. A 3D version of the Blu-ray was released in North America on November 1, 2011. On its first week of release (November 2–7, 2010) it sold 3,859,736 units (equal to $73,096,452) ranking No.1 for the week and immediately becoming the best-selling animated film of 2010 in terms of units sold (surpassing How to Train Your Dragon). As of July 18, 2012, it has sold 10,911,701 units ($185,924,247). It has become the best-selling DVD of 2010 in terms of units sold, but it lacks in terms of sales revenue and therefore ranks second behind Avatar on that list. It also sold about 4.0 million Blu-ray units, ranking as the fourth best-selling film of 2010. In the UK, it broke the record for the largest first day ever for animated feature both on DVD and Blu-ray in terms of sales revenue. Additionally, on its first day of release on iTunes it immediately became the most downloaded Disney film ever. Toy Story 3 received widespread acclaim from critics. The film review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes reports that 99% of critics have given the film a positive review based on 257 reviews, with an average score of 8.8/10. The site's consensus is: "Deftly blending comedy, adventure, and honest emotion, Toy Story 3 is a rare second sequel that really works." On the all-time Best of Rotten Tomatoes list, it ranks fourth behind both its predecessors, and was the best-reviewed film of 2010. Another review aggregator, Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 top reviews from mainstream critics, calculated a score of 92 based on 39 reviews. TIME named Toy Story 3 the best movie of 2010, as did Quentin Tarantino. In 2011, TIME named it one of "The 25 All-TIME Best Animated Films." A. O. Scott of The New York Times stated, "This film—this whole three-part, 15-year epic—about the adventures of a bunch of silly plastic junk turns out also to be a long, melancholy meditation on loss, impermanence and that noble, stubborn, foolish thing called love." Owen Gleiberman from Entertainment Weekly gave the film an A, saying, "Even with the bar raised high, Toy Story 3 enchanted and moved me so deeply I was flabbergasted that a digitally animated comedy about plastic playthings could have this effect." Gleiberman also wrote in the next issue that he, along with many other grown men, cried at the end of the film. Michael Rechtshaffen of The Hollywood Reporter also gave the film a positive review, saying, "Woody, Buzz and playmates make a thoroughly engaging, emotionally satisfying return." Mark Kermode of the BBC gave the film, and the series, a glowing review, calling it "the best movie trilogy of all time." In USA Today, Claudia Puig gave the film a complete 4 star rating, writing, "This installment, the best of the three, is everything a movie should be: hilarious, touching, exciting and clever." Lou Lumenick of the New York Post wrote, "Toy Story 3 (which is pointlessly being shown in 3-D at most locations) may not be a masterpiece, but it still had me in tears at the end." Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune gave the film 3 out of 4 stars, writing that, "Compared with the riches of all kinds in recent Pixar masterworks such as Ratatouille, WALL-E, and Up, Toy Story 3 looks and plays like an exceptionally slick and confident product, as opposed to a magical blend of commerce and popular art." Orlando Sentinel film critic Roger Moore, who gave the film 3½ out of 4 stars, wrote, "Dazzling, scary and sentimental, Toy Story 3 is a dark and emotional conclusion to the film series that made Pixar famous." Toy Story 3 earned $415,004,880 in North America, and $648,167,031 in other countries, totaling $1,063,171,911 worldwide, earning more revenue than the previous two films combined. It is the highest-grossing film in the series, the 11th highest-grossing film, the highest-grossing film of 2010, the third highest-grossing Disney film, the highest-grossing Pixar film, and the highest-grossing animated film of all time. In terms of estimated attendance, though, it still ranks fourth on the list of modern animated films, behind Shrek 2, Finding Nemo, and The Lion King. On its first weekend, Toy Story 3 topped the worldwide box office with $145.3 million ($153.7 million with weekday previews), which stands as the third-largest opening weekend worldwide for an animated feature. On August 27, 2010, its 71st day of release, it surpassed the $1 billion mark, becoming the second Disney film in 2010 (after Alice in Wonderland), the third Disney film overall (the other being Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest), and the only animated film to achieve this. In North America, Toy Story 3 is the twelfth highest-grossing film unadjusted for inflation. Adjusted for ticket price inflation though, it ranks ninetieth on the all-time chart. The film is also the highest-grossing film of 2010, the highest-grossing Pixar film, the second-highest-grossing G-rated film, the third-highest-grossing animated film, and the fourth-highest-grossing film distributed by Disney. The film earned $4 million at midnight shows from about 1,500 theaters and then grossed $41,148,961 on its opening day (Friday, June 18, 2010) from 4,028 theaters, including midnight earnings. It thus set an opening-day record for an animated film. During its opening weekend, the film grossed $110,307,189, topping the weekend chart. It set an opening-weekend record among Pixar films, among films released in June, (surpassed by Man of Steel) and among G-rated films. The film also achieved the second-highest opening weekend for an animated film, and the fourth largest opening weekend for a 2010 film. It averaged $27,385 per venue, marking the second highest for a G-rated film, and the second highest for an animated feature. Its opening-week gross (Friday-through-Thursday) of $167.6 million was the largest among animated films, the largest among 2010 films and the thirteenth largest of all time. It also the largest ten-day gross among 2010 films. It topped the box office for two consecutive weekends and scored the tenth largest second weekend with $59.3 million. It is the fourteenth highest-grossing film, the third highest-grossing animated film, the third highest-grossing film of 2010, the highest-grossing Pixar film, and the fifth highest-grossing Disney film. It topped the box office outside North America three times, on its first ($35.0 million), second, and sixth weekend (which was its largest). Its highest-grossing market after North America is Japan ($126.7 million), where it is the highest-grossing U.S. animated feature, followed by the UK & Ireland and Malta (£73.8 million - $116.6 million), where it is the fourth highest-grossing film, and Mexico ($59.4 million), where it is the second highest-grossing film. It set opening weekend records for animated films in Ecuador, Colombia, Mexico, China, Argentina, Hong Kong, Spain and the UK. It is currently the highest-grossing animated film of all time in the UK, Ireland and Malta, in Mexico, in Hong Kong, and in Egypt. It is the highest-grossing 2010 film in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Hong Kong, Mexico, Spain, the UK, & Ireland and Malta. On January 25, 2011, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced that Toy Story 3 was not only nominated for Best Animated Feature, but also for Best Picture. This makes Toy Story 3 not only the first only animated sequel in history to be nominated for Best Picture, but also the third animated film to be nominated for Best Picture (following Beauty and the Beast and Up), with Toy Story 3 becoming the second Pixar film to be nominated for both awards. Toy Story 3 also became the first ever Pixar film - and the first animated feature film since Shrek - to be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, though six of Pixar's previous films were nominated for the Best Original Screenplay: Toy Story, Finding Nemo, The Incredibles, Ratatouille, WALL-E, and Up. In 2011, it was nominated for a Kids' Choice Award for Favorite Animated Movie, but lost to Despicable Me. The film score of Toy Story 3 was composed and conducted by Randy Newman, his sixth for Pixar after Toy Story, A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters, Inc., and Cars. Disney did not release the soundtrack album for Toy Story 3 on Compact Disc (CD). It was only available, initially, as a music download in lossy formats such as MP3 and AAC. This was the second instance where Disney did not release the award-winning soundtrack of a Pixar film on CD. The first Pixar film not to have its soundtrack released on CD by Disney was Up. In January 2012, Intrada released the Toy Story 3 soundtrack on Compact Disc. All songs written and composed by Randy Newman.  In addition to the tracks included in the soundtrack album, the film also uses "Dream Weaver" by Gary Wright, "Le Freak" by Chic, and Randy Newman's original version of "You've Got a Friend in Me." Also, tracks "Cowboy!" and "Come to Papa" included material from Newman's rejected score to Air Force One. The song "Losing You" from Newman's own album Harps and Angels was also used in the first trailer for the film. The Judas Priest song "Electric Eye" was used in the temp score for the opening scene of Toy Story 3. The aliens are playing the tune in their sports car. But the song was ultimately replaced by another piece of music. In June 2011, Tom Hanks, the voice of Woody in the films, was asked while promoting Larry Crowne whether or not there would be a sequel for his grandchildren to see. "I think there will be, yeah. I think they're working on it now," he said, referring to Pixar. Despite constant unconfirmed rumours on social media sites, no such sequel has been announced yet.
Despicable Me is a 2010 American computer-animated 3D comedy film from Universal Pictures and Illumination Entertainment that was released on July 9, 2010 in the United States. It is Illumination Entertainment's first film. It was directed by Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud, based on an original story by Sergio Pablos. The film stars the voice of Steve Carell as Gru, a super-villain who adopts three girls (the voices of Miranda Cosgrove, Dana Gaier, and Elsie Fisher) from an orphanage; and the voice of Jason Segel as Vector, a rival of Gru who steals the Great Pyramid of Giza. When Gru learns of Vector's heist, he plans an even greater heist: to shrink and steal the Earth's moon. It was entirely animated by the French animation studio Mac Guff, which was later acquired by Illumination Entertainment. The film earned positive reviews from critics, and grossed over $543 million worldwide, against a budget of $69 million. A sequel, Despicable Me 2, released on July 3, 2013, is to be followed by a spin-off featuring Gru's Minions as the main characters on December 19, 2014. Gru, a super-villain, has his pride injured when an unknown super-villain steals the Great Pyramid of Giza, an action that is described by his colleague Dr. Nefario as making "all other villains look lame." Gru decides to do better, with the assistance of Dr. Nefario, by shrinking and stealing the moon, an idea based on his childhood dream of being an astronaut, which was always discouraged by his mother Marlena. The plan is quite expensive and Gru seeks a loan from the Bank of Evil, where the president Mr. Perkins is impressed by the plan, but will only provide the money if Gru can obtain a shrink ray first. Gru and his minions steal a shrink ray from a secret base in Asia but the up-and-coming super-villain, Vector, who was also responsible for the Pyramid theft, immediately steals it from Gru, as revenge for freezing his head earlier. Gru attempts to break into Vector's fortress to get the shrink ray back, but is defeated by numerous booby traps. However, he notices three orphan girls Margo, Edith, and Agnes easily walk into the base to sell Vector cookies. Gru, faking his credentials as a dentist, adopts the girls from Miss Hattie's Home for Girls, planning on using them to infiltrate Vector's base so he can steal the shrink ray back. However, Gru has much difficulty nurturing them properly between their rambunctiousness, their ballet classes, and his own ineptitude as a parent. Eventually, Gru and the girls arrive at Vector's fortress and Gru manages to steal the shrink ray. The girls then suggest a day at a theme park; Gru agrees, believing he can leave the girls there, but he is told by an attendant that they must be accompanied by an adult. He is then dragged around the theme park for the day, eventually warming up to the girls after they compliment him over blowing up a rigged carnival game. Later, Gru contacts Mr. Perkins, stating that he has finally got the shrink ray in his possession. Margo, Edith, and Agnes interrupt the meeting, and Perkins announces that he has lost confidence in Gru and will no longer fund his operations. As Gru tells the minions about the bad news, the girls offer the contents of their piggy bank to fund the plan. His minions then hand over their own savings. Gru, inspired, sacrifices parts of his lair to construct a spacecraft. Gru plans to steal the moon when it is nearest the Earth but this ends up being the same day as the girls' ballet recital. Gru becomes conflicted and Dr. Nefario, seeing this as interfering with the plan, arranges for the girls to be returned to the orphanage. Around the same time, Mr. Perkins informs Vector (who is actually Mr. Perkins' son) of Gru's possession of the shrink ray and the adoption of the three girls, inciting Vector to take action. Gru proceeds with his plan to steal the moon (defeating an attempt by Vector to stop him), successfully shrinking it to fit in his hand, but is too late to attend the recital. He then finds a note from Vector, who has kidnapped the girls, telling him to give him the moon in exchange for them. After arriving at Vector's lair, Gru readily makes the trade, but Vector reneges on the deal, flying off with the girls and the moon, much to Gru's anger. Meanwhile, Dr. Nefario has discovered that the effects of the shrink ray are temporary; the bigger the object was originally, the faster it will regain its original size. As the moon starts to expand in Vector's ship, Gru, Dr. Nefario, and the minions pull off a daring mid-air rescue of the girls just as the moon explodes out of Vector's ship and launches itself back into orbit, with Vector trapped on it forever. Some time later, Gru has readopted the girls and treats them as his daughters, writing them a bedtime storybook framed around his own experience. The film ends with the girls performing their own ballet recital for Gru, Marlena, Dr. Nefario, and the minions. Despicable Me: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is the soundtrack to the film of the same name, and it was released on July 6, 2010. It features new songs from the film written and performed by Pharrell Williams, and performances by Destinee & Paris, The Sylvers, Robin Thicke and The Bee Gees.][ NBC (which is owned by Universal) had an extensive marketing campaign leading up to the film's release. Sneak peeks were shown in episodes of The Biggest Loser. Despicable Me was also featured on Last Comic Standing when Gru comes in to audition. IHOP restaurants promoted the film by introducing three new menu items, a kids' breakfast meal, and a drink all having the word "minion" in them. Airheads candy released packages of the characters and came with a code for the Despicable Me video game.][ Best Buy released a free smartphone application called "Best Buy Movie Mode", which translated what the Minions were saying during the end credits of the 3D theatrical release. For the home media release of the film, the application was updated to translate the Minions' language throughout the entire film. In May 2010, three books related to the movie were published, as well as the children's puppet book featured in the film. The first, My Dad the Super Villain (ISBN 0316083828), was rated as a preschool book. The second, Despicable Me: The Junior Novel (ISBN 0316083801), was rated as being a Junior Reader for ages 8 to 12. The third, Despicable Me: The World's Greatest Villain (ISBN 0316083771), was rated for ages 3–6 years. The puppet book Sleepy Kittens (ISBN 031608381X) was written by Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio and illustrated by Eric Guillon. A video game titled Despicable Me: The Game was released for the PlayStation 2, PlayStation Portable and Wii. A Nintendo DS version was released under the name Despicable Me: Minion Mayhem. Namco also released a version for the iPhone and iPad platform entitled Despicable Me: Minion Mania, developed by Anino Games. Despicable Me was released on DVD, Blu-ray, and Blu-ray 3D on December 14, 2010. The release included three new short films, titled Home Makeover, Orientation Day and Banana. The film received generally positive reviews from critics. Review aggregation website Rotten Tomatoes gives a score of 81% based on 188 reviews, with an average score of 6.8/10. The site's critical consensus is: "Borrowing heavily (and intelligently) from Pixar and Looney Tunes, Despicable Me is a surprisingly thoughtful, family-friendly treat with a few surprises of its own." Metacritic, another review aggregation website, assigned the film a score of 72%, based on 34 reviews from mainstream critics. Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times praised the film, awarding it three stars out of a possible four. Other positive reviews came from Michael Phillips of the Chicago Tribune and Peter Travers of Rolling Stone. In contrast, A. O. Scott of The New York Times disliked the film, stating "while there's nothing worth despising, there's not much to remember either." Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote: "There is simply nothing here, except a pretext for lots of labored, slapstick spy-versus-spy type shenanigans between the two "villains." Released on July 9, 2010, in the United States, Despicable Me opened at the number one spot at the box office and pulled in $56.3 million, making it the third biggest opening grossing for an animated film in 2010 behind Toy Story 3 and Shrek Forever After. In its second weekend, the film dipped 42% to second place behind Inception with $32.8 million earned. The film then had another drop of 27% in its third weekend and finished in third place with $23.8 million. On August 5, 2010, the film crossed the $200 million mark, becoming the first Universal film to reach the milestone since 2007's The Bourne Ultimatum. On the weekend lasting from September 3–5, 2010, it surpassed Shrek Forever After to become the second highest-grossing animated film of 2010 in the United States and Canada, behind Toy Story 3. It is also the highest-grossing non-DreamWorks/non-Disney·Pixar animated film of all time in these territories. The film has made $251,513,985 in the United States and Canada as well as an estimated $291,600,000 overseas for a worldwide total of $543,010,705, against its $69 million budget. This film is also Universal's sixth highest-grossing film (unadjusted for inflation) and the tenth-highest-grossing animated feature of all-time in North America. In worldwide earnings, it is the sixth biggest film of Universal Studios, the fourth highest-grossing animated film of 2010 trailing Toy Story 3, Shrek Forever After, and Tangled, the 23rd highest-grossing animated film of all time and the 9th highest-grossing film of 2010. A sequel, Despicable Me 2, was released on July 3, 2013. It is produced by the same team that was behind the first film - along with directors Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud, and writers Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio. Steve Carell, Russell Brand, and Miranda Cosgrove reprise their roles; Kristen Wiig returns but voices a new character. New cast members include Benjamin Bratt as Eduardo, Gru's nemesis, and Steve Coogan as Silas Ramsbottom.
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