Question:

What are the 2 main branches of physical science?

Answer:

The two main branches of physical sciences are social science and natural science.

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natural science

The natural sciences are those branches of science that seek to elucidate the rules that govern the natural world through scientific methods, the cornerstone of which are measured by quantitative data. Based on formal sciences, they also attempt to provide mathematical (either deterministic or stochastic) models of natural processes. The term "natural science" is used to distinguish the subject from the social sciences, which apply the scientific method to study human behavior and social patterns; the humanities, which use a critical or analytical approach to study the human condition; and the formal sciences such as mathematics and logic, which use an a priori, as opposed to empirical methodology to study formal systems.

There are five branches of natural science: astronomy, biology, chemistry, the Earth sciences and physics. This distinguishes sciences that cover inquiry into the world of nature from humanities such as linguistics, anthropology, literary science, and from formal sciences such as mathematics and logic. Despite their differences, these sciences sometimes overlap. For example, the social sciences and biology both study human beings as organisms while mathematics is used regularly in all the natural sciences.

Knowledge Science
Natural sciences

The natural sciences are those branches of science that seek to elucidate the rules that govern the natural world through scientific methods, the cornerstone of which are measured by quantitative data. Based on formal sciences, they also attempt to provide mathematical (either deterministic or stochastic) models of natural processes. The term "natural science" is used to distinguish the subject from the social sciences, which apply the scientific method to study human behavior and social patterns; the humanities, which use a critical or analytical approach to study the human condition; and the formal sciences such as mathematics and logic, which use an a priori, as opposed to empirical methodology to study formal systems.

There are five branches of natural science: astronomy, biology, chemistry, the Earth sciences and physics. This distinguishes sciences that cover inquiry into the world of nature from humanities such as linguistics, anthropology, literary science, and from formal sciences such as mathematics and logic. Despite their differences, these sciences sometimes overlap. For example, the social sciences and biology both study human beings as organisms while mathematics is used regularly in all the natural sciences.

Academia
Social science

Social science refers to the academic disciplines concerned with society and the relationships among individuals within a society, which often rely primarily on empirical approaches. It is commonly used as an umbrella term to refer to anthropology, economics, political science, psychology and sociology. In a wider sense, it may often include some fields in the humanities such as archaeology, area studies, communication studies, cultural studies, folkloristics, history, law, linguistics, and rhetoric. The term may however be used in the specific context of referring to the original science of society, established in 19th century, sociology (Latin: socius, "companion"; Greek λόγος, lógos, "word", "knowledge", "study."). Émile Durkheim, Karl Marx and Max Weber are typically cited as the principal architects of modern social science by this definition.

Positivist social scientists use methods resembling those of the natural sciences as tools for understanding society, and so define science in its stricter modern sense. Interpretivist social scientists, by contrast, may use social critique or symbolic interpretation rather than constructing empirically falsifiable theories, and thus treat science in its broader sense. In modern academic practice, researchers are often eclectic, using multiple methodologies (for instance, by combining the quantitative and qualitative techniques). The term social research has also acquired a degree of autonomy as practitioners from various disciplines share in its aims and methods.]citation needed[

Physical science is the study of physics and chemistry of nature.]citation needed[ From the materialist and functionalist viewpoints it overlaps the life sciences where ecology studies the evidences of historical facts or evolution. Natural sciences bridge the phenomena in the physical sciences to the noumenon in the life sciences. The following is presented as an overview and topical guide of these physical sciences. It includes many simple machines.

Book:Social sciences
Branches of science

The main branches of science (also referred to as "sciences", "scientific fields", or "scientific disciplines") are commonly divided into two major groups: social sciences, which study human behavior and societies, and natural sciences, which study natural phenomena (including fundamental forces and biological life). These groupings are empirical sciences, which means the knowledge must be based on observable phenomena and be capable of being tested for its validity by other researchers working under the same conditions.

In addition to empirical sciences, there are the formal sciences, such as mathematics and logic, which use an a priori, as opposed to factual methodology to study formal systems. These three categories make up the fundamental sciences, on top of which are interdisciplinary and applied science, such as engineering and medicine. Specialized scientific fields that exist in all categories can include parts of other scientific disciplines but often possess their own terminology and expertise.

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