Question:

What are some leader quotes?

Answer:

"If the blind lead the blind, both shall fall into the ditch." - The Bible "If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader." - John Quincy Adams

More Info:

Bible Bible

The Hebrew Bible (also Hebrew Scriptures, Jewish Bible (Judaica Bible); Latin: Biblia Hebraica) is a term used by biblical scholars to refer to the Tanakh (Hebrew: תנ"ך‎), the canonical collection of Jewish texts, which is the common textual source of the several canonical editions of the Christian Old Testament. These texts are composed mainly in Biblical Hebrew, with some passages in Biblical Aramaic (in the books of Daniel, Ezra and a few others).

The content, to which the Protestant Old Testament closely corresponds, does not act as source to the deuterocanonical portions of the Roman Catholic, nor to the Anagignoskomena portions of the Eastern Orthodox Old Testaments. The term does not comment upon the naming, numbering or ordering of books, which varies with later Christian biblical canons.

In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

Genesis 1:1 in other translations

For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life.

John 3:16 in other translations

The New Testament (Koine Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē) is the second major part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament. Although Christians hold different views from Jews about the Old Testament—that is, the Hebrew Scriptures—Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The contents of the New Testament deal explicitly with first-century Christianity. Therefore, the New Testament (in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology. Both extended readings and phrases directly from the New Testament are also incorporated (along with readings from the Old Testament) into the various Christian liturgies. The New Testament has influenced not only religious, philosophical, and political movements in Christendom, but also has left an indelible mark on its literature, art, and music.

The New Testament is an anthology, a collection of Christian works written in the common Greek language of the first century, at different times by various writers, who were early Jewish disciples of Jesus of Nazareth. In almost all Christian traditions today, the New Testament consists of 27 books. The original texts were written in the first and perhaps the second centuries of the Christian Era, generally believed to be in Koine Greek, which was the common language of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Conquests of Alexander the Great (335–323 BC) until the evolution of Byzantine Greek (c. 600). All of the works which would eventually be incorporated into the New Testament would seem to have been written no later than around AD 150.

The Old Testament is a Christian term for a collection of religious writings by ancient Israelites that form the first section of Christian Bibles, in contrast to the Christian New Testament. The books included in the Old Testament (the Old Testament canon) varies markedly between Christian denominations; Protestants accept only the Hebrew Bible's canon but divide it into 39 books, while Catholics, the Eastern Orthodox, Coptic and Ethiopian churches recognise a considerably larger collection.

The books can be broadly divided into the Pentateuch, which tells how God chose Israel to be his chosen people; the history books telling the history of the Israelites from their conquest of Canaan to their defeat and exile in Babylon; the poetic and "Wisdom" books dealing, in various forms, with questions of good and evil in the world; and the books of the biblical prophets, warning of the consequences of turning away from God.

Vulgate

The Gutenberg Bible (also known as the 42-line Bible, the Mazarin Bible or the B42) was the first major book printed with movable type in the West. It marked the start of the "Gutenberg Revolution" and the age of the printed book in the West. Widely praised for its high aesthetic and artistic qualities, the book has an iconic status. Written in Latin, the Gutenberg Bible is an edition of the Vulgate, printed by Johannes Gutenberg, in Mainz, Germany, in the 1450s. Forty-eight copies, or substantial portions of copies, survive, and they are considered by many sources to be the most valuable books in the world, even though a complete copy has not been sold since 1978. The 36-line Bible, believed to be the second printed version of the Bible, is also sometimes referred to as a Gutenberg Bible, but is likely the work of another printer.

The Bible has been translated into many languages from the biblical languages of Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek. As of November 2012 the full Bible has been translated into 518 languages, and 2,798 languages have at least some portion of the Bible.

The Latin Vulgate was dominant in Western Christianity through the Middle Ages. Since then, the Bible has been translated into many more languages. English Bible translations also have a rich and varied history of more than a millennium.

OT: Septuagint (Melanchthon), Second Bomberg Edition (Creuziger)

AM Anfang schuff Gott Himel vnd Erden. Vnd die Erde war wüst vnd leer / vnd es war finster auff der Tieffe / Vnd der Geist Gottes schwebet auff dem Wasser. VND Gott sprach / Es werde Liecht / Vnd es ward Liecht.

Genesis 1:1 in other translations

Bible colleges are undergraduate institutions that prepare students for Church ministry with theological education, Biblical studies and practical ministry training.

The Association for Biblical Higher Education asserts that "there are more than 1,200 Bible schools and colleges in the United States and Canada," and that Bible colleges produce "a large percentage of North American evangelical missionaries and serve as a primary training center for local church leadership." The South Pacific Association of Bible Colleges claims that "more than fifty percent of all Protestant missionaries in the world today are graduates of the Bible Colleges." According to Theology-Degrees.com, there are over 300 accredited Bible colleges in the United States of America as of November 2012.

John Quincy Adams Listeni/ˈkwɪnzi/ (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth President of the United States (1825–1829). He served as American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former President John Adams and Abigail Adams. As a diplomat, Adams played an important role in negotiating many international treaties, most notably the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. As Secretary of State, he negotiated with the United Kingdom over the United States' northern border with Canada, negotiated with Spain the annexation of Florida, and authored the Monroe Doctrine. Historians agree he was one of the greatest diplomats and secretaries of state in American history.

As president, he sought to modernize the American economy and promoted education. Adams enacted a part of his agenda and paid off much of the national debt. He was stymied by a Congress controlled by his enemies, and his lack of patronage networks helped politicians eager to undercut him. He lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson. In doing so, he became the first president since his father to serve a single term.

John Quincy Adams Listeni/ˈkwɪnzi/ (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth President of the United States (1825–1829). He served as American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former President John Adams and Abigail Adams. As a diplomat, Adams played an important role in negotiating many international treaties, most notably the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. As Secretary of State, he negotiated with the United Kingdom over the United States' northern border with Canada, negotiated with Spain the annexation of Florida, and authored the Monroe Doctrine. Historians agree he was one of the greatest diplomats and secretaries of state in American history.

As president, he sought to modernize the American economy and promoted education. Adams enacted a part of his agenda and paid off much of the national debt. He was stymied by a Congress controlled by his enemies, and his lack of patronage networks helped politicians eager to undercut him. He lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson. In doing so, he became the first president since his father to serve a single term.

The National Republicans were a political party in the United States. During the administration of John Quincy Adams (1825–1829), the president's supporters were referred to as Adams Men or Anti-Jackson. When Andrew Jackson was elected President of the United States in 1828, this group went into opposition. The use of the term "National Republican" dates from 1830.

Before the elevation of John Quincy Adams to the presidency in 1825, the Democratic-Republican Party, which had been the only national American political party for over a decade, began to fracture, losing its infrastructure and identity. Its caucuses no longer met to select candidates because now they had separate interests. After the Election of 1824, factions developed in support of Adams and in support of Andrew Jackson. Adams politicians, including most ex-Federalists (such as Daniel Webster and even Adams himself), would gradually evolve into the National Republican party, and those politicians that supported Jackson would later help form the modern Democratic Party.

John Quincy Adams II (September 22, 1833 – August 14, 1894) was an American lawyer and politician.

Adams was the son of Charles Francis Adams and Abigail Brown Brooks, the grandson and namesake of president John Quincy Adams and the great-grandson of President John Adams. He graduated from Harvard University in 1853, studied law, attained admission to the bar, and practiced in Boston. He later established an experimental model farm near Quincy, Massachusetts. Adams married Frances (Fanny) Cadwalader Crowninshield (1839–1911), daughter of George (1812–1857) and Harriet Sears Crowninshield (1809–1873) of the politically powerful Crowninshield family.

The John Quincy Adams was a named train of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, between New York, New York and Boston, Massachusetts. The John Quincy Adams was an attempt by the New Haven to modernize rail travel and lure people out of their cars. The train was built by American Car and Foundry to a lightweight Talgo design, and was powered by two Fairbanks-Morse P-12-42 Diesel-electric locomotives, (One at each end of the train) connected by multiple unit control, through the train.

The train consisted of five sections, each made up of three short cars articulated together. The center car of each section had two axles (one at each end), with the remaining cars having a single axle each, being supported by adjacent cars at the end opposite the axle. The ride was rough, as with most of the other lightweight trains of the period, and the train was not a success.

Following is a list of all United States federal judges appointed by President John Quincy Adams during his presidency. In total Adams appointed one Justice to the Supreme Court of the United States and eleven judges to the United States district courts.

Judicial appointment history for United States federal courts

The John Adams Birthplace, in Quincy, Massachusetts, is the home in which United States President John Adams was born on October 30, 1735. This saltbox house is now part of the Adams National Historical Park operated by the National Park Service. The birthplace of Adams' son John Quincy Adams is only a few feet away, and Adams' later mansion, called Peacefield, is a few miles away, as are the graves of both presidents and their wives in the United First Parish Church. All are open to the public.

It is a typical saltbox home, characterized by the sloping roof.

The John Quincy Adams Birthplace, in Quincy, Massachusetts, is the saltbox home in which United States President John Quincy Adams was born in 1767. The birthplace of Adams' father, President John Adams, is only a few feet away, on the same property.

On December 19, 1960, the birthplace was designated a National Historic Landmark. The border of the national historic landmark includes both houses and a park area.

John Quincy Adams Ward (June 29, 1830 – May 1, 1910) was an American sculptor, who is most familiar for his over-lifesize standing statue of George Washington on the steps of Federal Hall on Wall Street.

He was born in Urbana, Ohio, a city that had been founded by his grandfather Col. William Ward, and went to live with his sister in Brooklyn, New York, where he trained under the well-established sculptor Henry Kirke Brown, who carved "J.Q.A. Ward, asst." on his equestrian monument of George Washington in Union Square. His younger brother was the artist, Edgar Melville Ward. Ward went to Washington in 1857, where he made a name with portrait busts of men in public life. In 1861 he worked for the Ames Manufacturing Company of Chicopee, Massachusetts, providing models for decorative objects including gilt-bronze sword hilts for the Union Army. Ames also was one of the largest brass, bronze and iron foundries in the US.

John Quincy Adams Nadenbousch (31 October 1824 – 13 September 1892) was a successful businessman, soldier and local politician.

Nadenbousch was born in Berkeley County, Virginia (later West Virginia), and later, in 1848, married Hester Jane Miller. Early in life he had worked as a carpenter and proprietor of a lumber yard in Martinsburg, and, by 1852, expanded his business affairs with the purchase of the Beeson flour mill, and soon established a distillery on the north side of Tuscarora Creek.

The John Quincy Adams and Elizabeth Young House, also known as the John Quincy Adams Young House, is a historic American saltbox house built in 1869 in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is located in the unincorporated Cedar Mill area of Washington County, Oregon, near Portland and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

John Quincy Adams Young and his wife Elizabeth settled in the area in 1862 and built a log cabin. In 1869, they built a new home, followed by another larger one built in 1873. Young served as the first postmaster of Cedar Mill starting in 1874. He named the community after the cedar trees in the area and for the mill he co-owned. The post office was located in the 1869 house, with the family living across the road in a newer home. Young remained as postmaster until 1882.

Massachusetts

This is a list of ambassadors of the United States to individual nations of the world, to international organizations, to past nations, and ambassadors-at-large.

Ambassadors are nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. An ambassador can be appointed during a recess of the Senate, but can serve only to the end of the next session of Congress unless subsequently confirmed by the Senate. Ambassadors serve "at the pleasure of the President," which means that they can be dismissed at any time.

The Adams family was a prominent political family in the United States during the late 18th century through early 20th centuries. Based in eastern Massachusetts, they formed part of the Boston Brahmin community.

Adams House, one of twelve residential colleges at Harvard, is named after John Adams and later members of the Adams family.

Portal icon Politics portal

The United States is a federal constitutional republic, in which the President of the United States (the head of state and head of government), Congress, and judiciary share powers reserved to the national government, and the federal government shares sovereignty with the state governments.

Historian Gregory Schneider identifies several constants in American conservatism: respect for tradition, support of republicanism, "the rule of law and the Christian religion," and a defense of "Western civilization from the challenges of modernist culture and totalitarian governments."

While the conservative tradition has played a major role in American politics and culture since the American Revolution, the organized conservative movement has played a key role in politics only since the 1950s, especially among Republicans and Southern Democrats.

John Quincy Adams Listeni/ˈkwɪnzi/ (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was the sixth President of the United States (1825–1829). He served as American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former President John Adams and Abigail Adams. As a diplomat, Adams played an important role in negotiating many international treaties, most notably the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. As Secretary of State, he negotiated with the United Kingdom over the United States' northern border with Canada, negotiated with Spain the annexation of Florida, and authored the Monroe Doctrine. Historians agree he was one of the greatest diplomats and secretaries of state in American history.

As president, he sought to modernize the American economy and promoted education. Adams enacted a part of his agenda and paid off much of the national debt. He was stymied by a Congress controlled by his enemies, and his lack of patronage networks helped politicians eager to undercut him. He lost his 1828 bid for re-election to Andrew Jackson. In doing so, he became the first president since his father to serve a single term.

The Quincy family /ˈkwɪnzi/ was a prominent political family in the United States during the mid-17th century through early 20th century and is connected to the Adams family through Abigail Adams.

The family estate was in Mount Wollaston, first independent, then part of Braintree, Massachusetts, and now the city of Quincy. The remaining pieces of the Quincy homestead are the Josiah Quincy House and the Dorothy Quincy Homestead, after the land was broken up into building lots called Wollaston Park in the 19th century and the Josiah Quincy Mansion was demolished in 1969.

Quincy is a city in Norfolk County, Massachusetts, United States. Its nickname is "City of Presidents." As a major part of Metropolitan Boston, Quincy is a member of Boston's Inner Core Committee for the Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC). Its population in 2010 was 92,271, making it the 8th largest city in the state.

Quincy is the birthplace of former U.S. Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams, as well as statesman John Hancock, fourth and longest serving President of the Continental Congress. It was named after Colonel John Quincy, maternal grandfather of Abigail Adams and after whom John Quincy Adams was also named. The city is pronounced /ˈkwɪnzi/ KWIN-zee, following the pronunciation of the family name, though both are generally mispronounced outside the area.

Inspire

Quincy (/ˈkwɪnsi/ KWIN-see), known as Illinois' "Gem City," is a river city along the Mississippi River and the county seat of Adams County, Illinois, United States. As of the 2010 census the city held a population of 40,633. It is the principal city of the Quincy micropolitan area, which contains portions of northeastern Missouri and has a population of 77,314 people. During the 19th Century, Quincy was a thriving transportation center as riverboats and rail service linked the city to many destinations west and along the river. It was once Illinois' second-largest city, surpassing Peoria in 1870. The city holds several historic districts, including the Downtown Quincy Historic District and the South Side German Historic District showcasing the architecture of Quincy's many German immigrants from the late-19th century.

Today, Quincy remains a prominent river city. It has been twice recognized as an All-American City and is a participant in the Tree City USA program. In the fall of 2010, Forbes Magazine listed Quincy as the eighth "Best small city to raise a family."

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