Question:

What are Laurel and Hardy's first name?

Answer:

The full names of the two comedians are Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Thank you for using AnswerParty!

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Stanley "Stan" Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson, 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965), was an English comic actor, writer and film director, famous as one half of the comedy team Laurel and Hardy. Laurel began his career in the British music hall, from where he took a number of his standard comic devices: the bowler hat, the deep comic gravity, and the nonsensical understatement. He was a member of "Fred Karno's Army," where he was Charlie Chaplin's understudy. The two arrived in the US on the same ship from Britain with the Karno troupe. Laurel went into films in the United States, with his acting career stretching between 1917 and 1951, and from "silents" to "talkies." It included a starring role in the film The Music Box (1932), which won an Academy Award.

In 1961, Laurel was given a Lifetime Achievement Academy Award for his pioneering work in comedy. He has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Blvd. In a 2005 UK poll to find The Comedians' Comedian, Laurel and Hardy ranked top among best double acts and seventh overall. In 2009, a bronze statue of the duo was unveiled in Laurel's hometown of Ulverston, Cumbria.

Oliver "Ollie" Hardy (born Norvell Hardy) January 18, 1892 – August 7, 1957) was an American comic actor famous as one half of Laurel and Hardy, the classic double act that began in the era of silent films and lasted 25 years, from 1927 to 1951. He was credited with his first film, Outwitting Dad, in 1914. In some of his early works, he was billed as Babe Hardy, using his nickname.

Laurel and Hardy were probably the most popular and critically acclaimed comedy double act of the early Classical Hollywood era of American cinema. Composed of thin Englishman Stan Laurel (1890–1965) and heavyset American Oliver Hardy (1892–1957), they became well known during the late 1920s to the mid-1940s for their slapstick comedy, with Laurel playing the clumsy and childlike friend of the pompous Hardy. They made more than 100 films together, initially two-reelers (short films) before expanding into feature length films in the 1930s. Their films include Sons of the Desert (1933), the Academy Award-winning short film The Music Box (1932), Babes in Toyland (1934), and Way Out West (1937). Hardy's catchphrase, "Well, here's another nice mess you've gotten me into!", is widely recognized.

Prior to the double act, both were established actors, with Laurel appearing in over 50 films and Hardy in more than 250. Although the two comedians first worked together on the film The Lucky Dog (1921), this was a chance pairing, and it was not until 1926, when both separately signed contracts with the Hal Roach film studio, that they appeared in movie shorts together. Laurel and Hardy officially became a team the following year, in the silent short film Putting Pants on Philip (1927). The pair remained with the Roach studio until 1940, then appeared in eight "B" comedies for 20th Century Fox and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer from 1941 to 1945. After finishing their movie commitments at the end of 1944, they concentrated on stage shows, embarking on a music hall tour of England, Ireland, and Scotland. In 1950, their last film was a French/Italian co-production called Atoll K, before retiring from the screen. They appeared together in 107 films. They starred in 40 short sound films, 32 short silent films and 23 full-length feature films, and made 12 guest or cameo appearances, including the Galaxy of Stars promotional film (1936).]citation needed[

Entertainment

A silent film is a film with no synchronized recorded sound, especially with no spoken dialogue. In silent films for entertainment the dialogue is transmitted through muted gestures, mime and title cards. The idea of combining motion pictures with recorded sound is nearly as old as film itself, but because of the technical challenges involved, synchronized dialogue was only made practical in the late 1920s with the perfection of the Audion amplifier tube and the introduction of the Vitaphone system. After the release of The Jazz Singer in 1927, "talkies" became more and more commonplace. Within a decade, popular widespread production of silent films had ceased.

Film Laurel

Twice Two is a Laurel and Hardy short film. It is one of only three films where the boys each play a dual role.

A year prior to the first scene, Stan Laurel married Oliver Hardy's sister (played by Oliver), and Oliver married Stan's sister (played by Stan) in a double wedding. They all live together and Stan and Ollie work in the same office. After some gags involving telephones, the wives are seen making preparations for a surprise party to celebrate their first anniversary during which a cake lands on Mrs Laurel's head, causing her to bear an uncanny resemblance to a portrait of Elizabeth I on the kitchen wall. Stan and Ollie then arrive but the couples cannot help but squabble throughout the party. In the final scenes a delivery boy (played by Charlie Hall) arrives with another cake which is thrown in Mrs Laurel's face by an acrimonious Mrs Hardy.

45 Minutes From Hollywood (1926) is an American two-reel silent film released by Pathé Exchange.

At the time, it was known as a Glenn Tryon vehicle, but today it is best remembered as the second instance of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy appearing in the same film together — although they do not share any scenes — at least half a decade after their first chance billing in The Lucky Dog (1921).

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