Question:

What accomplishments did the Shang and Tang dynasty's have?

Answer:

The Shang dynasty was founded by a rebel king who overthrew the last Xia ruler in the Battle of Mingtiao.

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The Xia Dynasty (Chinese: 夏朝; pinyin: Xià Cháo; Wade–Giles: Hsia-Ch'ao; IPA: [ɕiâ tʂʰɑ̌ʊ̯]; c. 2070 – c. 1600 BCE) is the first dynasty in China to be described in ancient historical chronicles such as Bamboo Annals, Classic of History and Records of the Grand Historian. The dynasty was established by the legendary Yu the Great after Shun, the last of the Five Emperors, gave his throne to him. The Xia was later succeeded by the Shang Dynasty (1600–1046 BCE).

Cheng Tang of Shang (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: Tāng)(ca. 1675 BC-1646 BC) was the first ruling king of the Shang Dynasty in Chinese history. He overthrew Jie, the last ruler of the Xia Dynasty.

Tang’s given name is . One of his ancestors is identified as Yilü (乙履), who was married to Jiandi, the daughter of Gaoxin. Yilu had a son called Yao Situ, who was appointed as vassal by the Xia King for his contribution to the people. Thirteen generations later, Tang’s father was born. He was named Zhugui.

The Battle of Mingtiao was a legendary battle between the Xia Dynasty and the Shang Dynasty, resulting in a Shang victory which created the circumstances for the elevation of the Duke of Shang to the throne of China.

When the throne of Xia dynasty was passed down to Jie of Xia, the power of the Xia clan was no longer as strong as before. Jie was generally corrupt and irresponsible. He felt that the original palace was too simple, he ordered for construction of the tilt palace. This palace took seven years and tens of thousands of slaves to build. It also used up huge sums of money. The peasants were resentful.

Tang or TANG may refer to:

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Tan E

King Jie (Chinese: ; pinyin: Jié 1728–1675 BCE) was the 17th and last ruler of the Xia dynasty of China. He is traditionally regarded as a tyrant and oppressor who brought about the collapse of a dynasty. Around 1600, BCE Jie was defeated by Shang Tang, bringing an end to the Xia Dynasty that lasted about 500 years, and a rise to the new Shang Dynasty.

Jie (桀) is generally known as Xia Jie (夏桀) or Jie of Xia. His given name was Lü Gui (履癸). Jie ascended to the throne in the year of Renchen (壬辰). Initially, his capital was in Zhenxun. He lived there for three years and constructed his tilt palace. About the same time, he destroyed the pyramid of Rong (容台), and quelled a rebellion by the Quanyi people (aka Fei Barbarians) after they entered Qi, near Fen.

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The 2nd millennium BC marks the transition from the Middle to the Late Bronze Age.

Its first half is dominated by the Middle Kingdom of Egypt and Babylonia. The alphabet develops. Indo-Iranian migration onto the Iranian plateau and onto the Indian subcontinent propagates the use of the chariot. Chariot warfare and population movements lead to violent changes at the center of the millennium, a new order emerges with Greek dominance of the Aegean and the rise of the Hittite Empire. The end of the millennium sees the transition to the Iron Age. World population begins to rise steadily, reaching some 50 million towards 1000 BC.

Ancient Chinese States (simplified Chinese: 诸侯; traditional Chinese: 諸侯; pinyin: Zhūhóu) were typified by variously sized city states and territories that existed in China prior to its unification by Qin Shi Huang in 221 BCE. In many cases these were vassal states characterized by tribute paid to the ruling Zhou Dynasty (1046–256 BCE). Known as Zhuhou (諸侯/诸侯), independent states or fiefdoms would again emerge during later dynasties as a political expedient when required.

According to the sinocentric viewpoint and the Mandate of Heaven, China was the center of the world and the incumbent emperor its only ruler; all other would-be potentates and rulers were merely vassals of the Middle Kingdom or Zhōngguó (中国/中国). As a result, from the earliest times the Chinese viewed the world as a series of concentric spheres of influence emanating outward from their capital. Within the closest circle lay the vassal states who pledged allegiance to the Zhou ruler. Apart from Zhou itself which occupied territory around its capital, each state bore the suffix Guó (国/国) meaning state or nation. Of the 150 or so states, some were little more than a small fortified town or city whilst others possessed a capital as well as other urban areas and controlled significant amounts of territory.

Chinese historiography
Timeline of Chinese history
Dynasties in Chinese history
Linguistic history
Art history
Economic history
Education history
Science and technology history
Legal history
Media history
Military history
Naval history

The Shang Dynasty (Chinese: 商朝; pinyin: Shāng cháo) or Yin Dynasty (Chinese: 殷代; pinyin: Yīn dài), according to traditional historiography, ruled in the Yellow River valley in the second millennium BC, succeeding the Xia Dynasty and followed by the Zhou Dynasty. The classic account of the Shang comes from texts such as the Classic of History, Bamboo Annals and Records of the Grand Historian. According to the traditional chronology based upon calculations made approximately 2,000 years ago by Liu Xin, the Shang ruled from 1766 BC to 1122 BC, but according to the chronology based upon the "current text" of Bamboo Annals, they ruled from 1556 BC to 1046 BC. The Xia–Shang–Zhou Chronology Project dated them from c. 1600 BC to 1046 BC.

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