Question:

What about a mazda 6?

Answer:

Mazda 6 is reasonably safe by current standards. The highly-regarded independent Insurance Institute for Highway Safety tests on the Mazda 6 in 40 mph head-on

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Insurance Institute Mazda Highway Safety

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a U.S. non-profit organization funded by auto insurers, established in 1959 and headquartered in Arlington, Virginia. It works to reduce the number of motor vehicle crashes, and the rate of injuries and amount of property damage in the crashes that still occur. It carries out research and produces ratings for popular passenger vehicles as well as for certain consumer products such as child car booster seats.

The Institute's front crash test differs from that of the American government's National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) New Car Assessment Program in that its tests are offset. This test exposes 40% of the front of the vehicle to an impact with a deformable barrier at approximately 40 mph (64 km/h). Because only 40% of the vehicle's front must stand the impact, it shows the structural strength better than the NHTSA's full-width testing does. The IIHS began this crash test in January 1993.

The Mazda6 or Mazda 6 (known as the Mazda Atenza in China and Japan) is a large family car produced by the Japanese car manufacturer Mazda since 2002, now in its third generation. The Mazda6 has sold over one million units worldwide since its introduction, hitting this sales milestone faster than all previous Mazdas.

The Mazda6 was the first example of the company's new Stylish, Insightful, and Spirited design philosophy followed by the Mazda2 in December 2002, the RX-8 in August 2003, the Mazda3 in January 2004, the Mazda5 in the summer of 2005, the MX-5 in October 2005, and the Mazda CX-7 in November 2006. The Mazda6 is the successor of the Mazda 626, also known as the Mazda Capella and the Mazda Cronos. The 2003 Mazda6 is essentially the 4th generation Mazda 626 as the Mazda6 continues on the G-platform, progressing from the GF-platform 626/Capella to the GG-platform Mazda6.

A sports car (sportscar is a small, usually two seat, two door automobile designed for spirited performance and nimble handling. Sports cars may be spartan or luxurious but high maneuverability and minimum weight are requisite.

The Ford CD3 platform (for "C/D-class") is a Ford midsize car automobile platform. It was designed by Mazda.]citation needed[ The original Mazda chassis code for the CD3 platform is Mazda G platform, which Ford Motor Company has used every evolution of since 1983. The platform is designed for either front, all-wheel drive or Ford's hybrid powertrain.

The platform is based on a unitized welded steel body (monocoque) with an independent short long arms (SLA) double wishbone front suspension with stabilizer bar and an independent multi-link twist blade rear suspension with stabilizer bar.

The Mazda6 or Mazda 6 (known as the Mazda Atenza in China and Japan) is a large family car produced by the Japanese car manufacturer Mazda since 2002, now in its third generation. The Mazda6 has sold over one million units worldwide since its introduction, hitting this sales milestone faster than all previous Mazdas.

The Mazda6 was the first example of the company's new Stylish, Insightful, and Spirited design philosophy followed by the Mazda2 in December 2002, the RX-8 in August 2003, the Mazda3 in January 2004, the Mazda5 in the summer of 2005, the MX-5 in October 2005, and the Mazda CX-7 in November 2006. The Mazda6 is the successor of the Mazda 626, also known as the Mazda Capella and the Mazda Cronos. The 2003 Mazda6 is essentially the 4th generation Mazda 626 as the Mazda6 continues on the G-platform, progressing from the GF-platform 626/Capella to the GG-platform Mazda6.

Sedans Mazda

The MX-5, released as the MX-5 Miata /miˈɑːtə/ in North America, and the Roadster in Japan, is a lightweight two-seater roadster with a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout. Manufactured by Mazda in Hiroshima, Japan, the model debuted in 1989 at the Chicago Auto Show. The MX-5 was conceived as a small roadster – with light weight and minimal mechanical complexity limited only by legal and safety requirements; technologically modern, but philosophically descending from small British and Italian roadsters of the 1960s such as the Triumph Spitfire, MG MGB, Fiat 124 Sport Spider, Alfa Romeo Spider, and Lotus Elan.

The second generation MX-5 (NB) was launched in 1998 and the current (NC) model has been in production since 2005. It continues to be the best-selling two-seat convertible sports car in history and by February 2011 over 900,000 MX-5s had been built and sold around the world.

The Mazda Demio is a supermini manufactured by Mazda introduced in 1996, now in its third generation, marketed globally also as the Mazda2 — and previously marketed under nameplates including Mazda 121, Mazda Metro and Ford Festiva Mini Wagon because it was a foundation- an XUV.

The third generation Demio earned the 2008 World Car of the Year title.

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A mid-size car (occasionally referred to as an intermediate) is the North American/Australian standard for an automobile with a size equal to or greater than that of a compact. In Europe mid-sizers are referred to as D-segment or large family cars.

The automobile that defined this size in the United States was the Rambler Six that was introduced in 1956, although it was called "compact" car at that time. The mid-size class then grew out of the compacts of the early-1960s. For example, the Ford Fairlane was referred to at its introduction in 1962 as a compact intermediate because it was barely bigger than its close relative, the Falcon. General Motors' first entries in the class, such as the Oldsmobile F-85, Pontiac Tempest, and Buick Special were not mechanically related to the compact Chevrolet Corvair, but were similar in size.

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