Question:

Was a haunting in Connecticut really based on a true story?

Answer:

It sure is! "The Haunting in Connecticut" tells the story of the Snedeker family, who in 1986 rented an old house in CT. AnswerParty!

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Connecticut Films

The Haunting in Connecticut is a 2009 American psychological horror film produced by Gold Circle Films and directed by Peter Cornwell. The film is alleged to be about Carmen Snedeker and her family, though Ray Garton, author of In a Dark Place: The Story of a True Haunting (1992), has publicly distanced himself from the accuracy of the events he depicted in the book. The film's story follows the fictional Campbells as they move into a house (a former mortuary) to mitigate the strains of travel on their cancer-stricken son, Matthew. The family soon becomes haunted by violent and traumatic events from supernatural forces occupying the house.

Although it was a moderately successful film at the box office (it grossed $77,527,732.), it received "generally unfavorable reviews" according to Metacritic. Gold Circle Films announced the production of two more entries in the franchise, The Haunting in Connecticut 2: Ghosts of Georgia and The Haunting in New York. They noted, however, that neither film would be a direct sequel to Haunting in Connecticut and would instead be self-contained films with unique characters.

Paranormal television is a genre of popular reality television programming. Its scope comprises purportedly factual investigations of paranormal phenomena, rather than fictional representations found in such shows as The Ghosts of Motley Hall and Ghostbusters, or cartoon/children's series such as Scooby-Doo and Rentaghost.

Accounts of supernatural occurrences have always been common in the print media. The 1705 pamphlet "A True Relation of the Apparition of One Mrs Veal" by Daniel Defoe is a well-known example. Local TV news programs in the UK and USA have featured ghost stories since the 1960s. Paranormal television arose from this tradition.

The Haunting

A Haunting is a 2005 American paranormal anthology television series that depicts eyewitness accounts of possession, exorcism, and ghostly encounters. The show originally aired from October 28, 2005 to November 9, 2007 on the Discovery Channel, which produced four seasons of 39 episodes. The program features narrations, interviews, and dramatic re-enactments based on various accounts of paranormal experiences at reportedly haunted and mostly residential locations.

The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States. Flowing roughly north-south for 410 miles (660 km) through four U.S. states, the Connecticut rises at the U.S. border with Quebec, Canada, and discharges at Long Island Sound. Its watershed encompasses five U.S. states and one Canadian province - 11,260 square miles (29,200 km2) - via 148 tributaries, 38 of which are major rivers. Discharging at 19,600 cubic feet (560 m3) per second, the Connecticut produces 70% of the Long Island Sound's freshwater. The Connecticut River Valley is home to some of the northeastern United States' most productive farmland, as well as a metropolitan region of approximately 2 million people surrounding the river's largest city, Springfield, Massachusetts, and the state of Connecticut's capital, Hartford.

Ray Garton (born 2 December 1962 in Redding, California) is an American author, well known for his work in horror fiction. He has written over sixty books, and in 2006 was presented with the World Horror Convention Grand Master Award.

Edward "Ed" Warren Miney (September 7, 1926 – August 23, 2006) and Lorraine Rita Warren, née Moran, (born January 31, 1927) were American paranormal investigators and authors associated with prominent cases of haunting. Edward was a World War II US Navy veteran and former police officer who became a self-taught, self-proclaimed expert Demonologist, author, and lecturer. His wife Lorraine was a professed clairvoyant and a light trance medium who worked closely with her husband.

A social issue (also called a social problem or a social situation) is an issue that relates to society's perception of a person's personal lives. Different cultures have different perceptions and what may be "normal" behavior in one society may be a significant social issue in another society. Social issues are distinguished from economic issues. Some issues have both social and economic aspects, such as immigration. There are also issues that don't fall into either category, such as wars.

Thomas Paine, in Rights of Man and Common Sense, addresses man's duty to "allow the same rights to others as we allow ourselves". The failure to do so causes the birth of a social issue.

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