Question:

Is the guy who plays Will Truman on Will and Grace really gay?

Answer:

Eric McCormack who plays Will Truman on Will and Grace is not gay he has been married sense 1997. Thanks for asking!

More Info:

William Pierce "Will" Truman is a fictional character on the American sitcom Will & Grace, portrayed by Eric McCormack. He is a gay lawyer who lives in the Upper West Side of New York City with his best friend, Grace Adler. The series also portrays his relationship with the two other main characters, Karen Walker (Megan Mullally) and Jack McFarland (Sean Hayes).


Eric McCormack

Eric James McCormack (born April 18, 1963) is a Canadian/American actor, musician, writer and producer. Born in Toronto, he began his acting career performing in school plays at Stephen Leacock Collegiate Institute High School. He left Ryerson University in 1985 to accept a position with the Stratford Shakespeare Festival, where he spent five years performing in numerous play productions.

For much of the late 1990s, he lived in Los Angeles and had minor roles. He made his feature film debut in the 1992 science fiction The Lost World. McCormack appeared in multiple television series, including Top Cops, Street Justice, Lonesome Dove: The Series, Townies, and Ally McBeal. McCormack later gained worldwide recognition for playing Will Truman in the American sitcom Will & Grace, which premiered in September 1998. His performance earned him a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series in 2001.

William Pierce "Will" Truman is a fictional character on the American sitcom Will & Grace, portrayed by Eric McCormack. He is a gay lawyer who lives in the Upper West Side of New York City with his best friend, Grace Adler. The series also portrays his relationship with the two other main characters, Karen Walker (Megan Mullally) and Jack McFarland (Sean Hayes).

Max Mutchnick
David Kohan
James Burrows
Jhoni Marchinko
Jeff Greenstein
Jon Kinnally
Tracy Poust
David Flebotte

Will & Grace is an American television sitcom, originally based on the relationship between William Truman and Grace Adler, and is set in New York City. It was broadcast on NBC from September 21, 1998 to May 18, 2006 for a total of eight seasons. Will & Grace was, during its original run, the most successful television series with gay principal characters. It still enjoys success in syndication.

Television
Will & Grace

Max Mutchnick
David Kohan
James Burrows
Jhoni Marchinko
Jeff Greenstein
Jon Kinnally
Tracy Poust
David Flebotte

Will & Grace is an American television sitcom, originally based on the relationship between William Truman and Grace Adler, and is set in New York City. It was broadcast on NBC from September 21, 1998 to May 18, 2006 for a total of eight seasons. Will & Grace was, during its original run, the most successful television series with gay principal characters. It still enjoys success in syndication.

Truman

"A Chorus Lie" is the sixteenth episode of the American television series Will & Grace's fourth season. It was written by Tracy Poust and Jon Kinnally and directed by series producer James Burrows. The episode originally aired on NBC in the United States on February 7, 2002. Guest stars in "A Chorus Lie" include Matt Damon, Leslie Jordan, and Patrick Kerr.

In the episode, Jack (Sean Hayes) begins a rivalry with a fellow named Owen (Matt Damon). They are competing to be the final entrant in a gay men's chorus, and after learning that Owen is straight, Jack tries to "in" him with help from Grace (Debra Messing). Meanwhile, Karen (Megan Mullally) tries to pass off Will (Eric McCormack) as her lover and not her lawyer when she discovers that she is the object of pity for being single at her own Valentine's Day party.

Grace Elizabeth Adler-Markus (née Adler) is a fictional character in the American sitcom Will & Grace, portrayed by Debra Messing. She is a Jewish interior designer, living in New York City with her gay best friend Will Truman (played by Eric McCormack). She is originally from Schenectady, New York, and has graduated from Columbia University. She also mentions in season 2 that she attended the Fashion Institute.

Grace was born on April 26, 1967, in Schenectady, New York.]citation needed[ She has been particularly influenced by her mother, Bobbi (Debbie Reynolds), a flamboyant actor from whom she inherited her many neuroses (as displayed in Bobbi's first appearance in season 1's "The Unsinkable Mommy Adler"). Grace also constantly strives for the affection of her father Martin (Alan Arkin), competing with her two sisters (one younger, one older), who have more obvious problems than she (Joyce, played by Sara Rue, is a mentally slow compulsive overeater, while Janet, portrayed by Geena Davis, is rarely employed and promiscuous). Grace herself is decidedly selfish and neurotic, but this is usually played for laughs, like when her husband Leo asked, "You want me to be happy, right?" and she sweetly replied "Not if it affects me negatively in any way." She is also somewhat vain, once declaring herself to be a "frickin' bombshell" and believing that she bears a strong resemblance to red-haired celebrities like Rita Hayworth (once even thinking a photo of Hayworth was one of herself) and Nicole Kidman. This, however, leads to her being taken down a peg, and she is usually the butt of numerous jokes by other characters. In one episode, while in Los Angeles, she is repeatedly mistaken for Kathy Griffin by tourists.

Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention. Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens. The process has been accelerated in modern times by an entertainment industry which records and sells entertainment products. Entertainment evolves and can be adapted to suit any scale, ranging from an individual who chooses a private entertainment from a now enormous array of pre-recorded products; to a banquet adapted for two; to any size or type of party, with appropriate music and dance; to performances intended for thousands; and even for a global audience.

The experience of being entertained has come to be strongly associated with amusement, so that one common understanding of the idea is fun and laughter, although many entertainments have a serious purpose. This may be the case in the various forms of ceremony, celebration, religious festival, or satire for example. Hence, there is the possibility that what appears as entertainment may also be a means of achieving insight or intellectual growth.

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

A social issue (also called a social problem or a social situation) is an issue that relates to society's perception of a person's personal lives. Different cultures have different perceptions and what may be "normal" behavior in one society may be a significant social issue in another society. Social issues are distinguished from economic issues. Some issues have both social and economic aspects, such as immigration. There are also issues that don't fall into either category, such as wars.

Thomas Paine, in Rights of Man and Common Sense, addresses man's duty to "allow the same rights to others as we allow ourselves". The failure to do so causes the birth of a social issue.

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