Question:

Is New York state shaped like a boot?

Answer:

No, the shape of New York state looks more like a key than a boot! AnswerParty for now!

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New York

New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the third-most populous, and the seventh-most densely populated of the 50 United States. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east. The state has a maritime border with Rhode Island east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Ontario to the west and north, and Quebec to the north. The state of New York is often referred to as New York State, so as to distinguish it from New York City.

New York City, with a Census-estimated population of over 8.3 million in 2012, is the most populous city in the United States. Alone, it makes up over 40 percent of the population of New York State. It is known for its status as a center for finance and culture and for its status as the largest gateway for immigration to the United States. New York City attracts considerably more foreign visitors than any other US city. Both the state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, future King James II of England.

Booting Boots
System software

System software (or systems software) is computer software designed to operate and control the computer hardware and to provide a platform for running application software.

System software includes the following:

Boot Footwear Clothing
Computer architecture

In computer science and engineering, computer architecture is a set of disciplines that describes a computer system by specifying its parts and their relations.

For example, at a high level, computer architecture may be concerned with how the central processing unit (CPU) acts and how it uses computer memory. Some fashionable (2011) computer architectures include cluster computing and Non-Uniform Memory Access.


Boot jack

A boot jack, sometimes known as a boot pull, is a small tool which aids in the removal of boots. It consists of a U-shaped mouth which grips the heel of the boot, and a flat area to which weight can be applied. To operate it, the user places the heel of the boot in the mouth of the jack, stands on the back of the device with the other foot, and pulls his foot free of the front boot. The process is then repeated to remove the other boot.

The boot jack has several advantages over the removal of boots by hand. By allowing the wearer to pull his foot straight up and out of the boot, and by using his full body weight to hold the boot in place, far greater leverage and a much more secure grip are possible than can be achieved with the hands. In addition, the wearer is spared the inconvenience of having to bend over or sit down to remove the boots, or directly handle them if they are dirty.

The startup process of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 is different from previous versions of Windows. (In this article, unless otherwise specified, "Windows Vista" refers to any of these operating systems.)

For Windows Vista, the boot sector loads the Windows Boot Manager (hidden system file BOOTMGR in the System Reserved Volume), accesses the Boot Configuration Data store and uses the information to load the operating system.

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