Question:

Is it illegal to move out in the state of Washington at age 17?

Answer:

You cannot legally move out in the state of Washington if you are under the age of 18 years old.

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The Washington Court of Appeals is the intermediate level appellate court for the state of Washington. The court is divided into three divisions. Division I is based in Seattle, Division II is based in Tacoma, and Division III is based in Spokane. The need for an intermediate appellate court to relieve the heavy workload of the Washington Supreme Court was felt as far back as 1929 when the state's Judicial Council suggested the establishment of such a court as a possible option for judicial restructuring. However, nothing happened until the mid-1960s, when work began on a Court of Appeals. A Constitutional Amendment was passed on November 5, 1968 authorizing the legislature to create a Court of Appeals, and to define its composition and jurisdiction. The legislature passed the enabling act, and a Court of Appeals, with three divisions with a total of 12 judges was established on May 12. 1969. The initial appointments were made by Governor Dan Evans with the judges all facing election at the general election of 1970 with each elected judge initially serving terms of two, four and six years determined by lot. The Court currently has 22 judges, who sit in three geographic divisions. Within each division cases are heard by panels of three. There is no en banc procedure. Judges are elected for 6-year terms and must retire like the judges of the other Washington courts at the end of the calendar year in which they reach the age of 75. By statute, the court is empowered to hear the following types of cases: 1. As a matter of right, all appeals from final judgments’ of the Superior Court, and all other orders that effectively cut-off further litigation, such as condemnation orders, termination of parental rights, juvenile court proceedings, and incompetency proceedings. Division I sits in Seattle, and is the smallest of the three geographic divisions, though the largest by population. It stretches from the White River (to the extent it serves at part of King county's southern boundary) in the south to the Canadian border in the north, and from the Cascade Range in the east to the San Juan Islands in the west. The division hears appeals from Island, King, San Juan, Skagit, Snohomish and Whatcom. This division has ten judges: Division II sits in Tacoma and hears appeals from the counties of Clallam, Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Kitsap, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, Skamania (see note, infra.), Thurston and Wahkiakum. David Armstrong Division III sits in Spokane and includes the three-fifths of the state's land area that lies east of the Cascade Range. In addition to the state's second largest city, Spokane; it embraces the regional cities of Yakima and the Tri-Cities of Kennewick, Pasco, and Richland. It hears appeals from Adams, Asotin, Benton, Chelan, Columbia, Douglas, Ferry, Franklin, Garfield, Grant, Kittitas, Klickitat (see note, infra.), Lincoln, Okanigan, Pend Orelle, Spokane, Stevens, Walla Walla, Whitman and Yakima counties. This division has five judges: Skamania County is in Division II; Klickitat County is in Division III. These counties are sparsely populated, so do not qualify for their own Superior Court Judge. They must share one Superior Court Judge. When the judge presides in Skamania County, Division II opinions are followed. When the judge presides in Klickitat County, Division III opinions are followed. When the Divisions issue conflicting opinions, practitioners must be careful to follow/cite from the appropriate appellate division.
Hartline is a town in Grant County, Washington, United States. The population was 151 at the 2010 census. There is a High School named Almira-Coulee/Hartline High School. The name "Hartline" is an americanized spelling of the German last name "Hartlein" and is an uncommon last name. Hartline was named for early settler John Hartline. It was officially incorporated on March 6, 1907. Hartline is located at (47.690010, -119.107279). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.33 square miles (0.85 km2), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 151 people, 62 households, and 37 families residing in the town. The population density was 457.6 inhabitants per square mile (176.7 /km2). There were 87 housing units at an average density of 263.6 per square mile (101.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 90.7% White, 0.7% African American, 1.3% Asian, 4.6% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.9% of the population. There were 62 households of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.2% were married couples living together, 4.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 1.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.3% were non-families. 33.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.16. The median age in the town was 41.8 years. 25.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.5% were from 25 to 44; 31.7% were from 45 to 64; and 14.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 53.6% male and 46.4% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 134 people, 60 households, and 36 families residing in the town. The population density was 406.6 people per square mile (156.8/km²). There were 77 housing units at an average density of 233.6 per square mile (90.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 93.28% White, 1.49% Native American, 2.24% from other races, and 2.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.24% of the population. There were 60 households out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.0% were non-families. 36.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.78. In the town the age distribution of the population shows 22.4% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 32.1% from 25 to 44, 20.1% from 45 to 64, and 20.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 109.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.2 males. The median income for a household in the town was $27,917, and the median income for a family was $35,625. Males had a median income of $24,792 versus $26,250 for females. The per capita income for the town was $14,335. There were 5.7% of families and 8.5% of the population living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and none of those over 64.
Harrington is a city in Lincoln County, Washington, United States. The population was 424 at the 2010 census. It was named after W.P. Harrington, a banker from Colusa, California who had heavily invested in local land. Harrington was first settled in 1879 by Adam and Jacob Ludy. Harrington was officially incorporated on April 17, 1902. Harrington is located at (47.480251, -118.255422). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.38 square miles (0.98 km2), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 424 people, 184 households, and 119 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,115.8 inhabitants per square mile (430.8 /km2). There were 219 housing units at an average density of 576.3 per square mile (222.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.7% White, 0.9% African American, 3.5% Native American, 0.7% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.8% of the population. There were 184 households of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.2% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 35.3% were non-families. 32.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age in the city was 46.1 years. 22.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 5.9% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 18.9% were from 25 to 44; 29.2% were from 45 to 64; and 23.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.4% male and 52.6% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 426 people, 187 households, and 115 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,122.2 people per square mile (432.8/km²). There were 235 housing units at an average density of 619.1 per square mile (238.8/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 97.18% White, 1.41% Native American, 0.23% Asian, and 1.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.94% of the population There were 187 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.0% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.92 In the city the population was spread out with 25.6% under the age of 18, 4.2% from 18 to 24, 22.3% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 22.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.1 males The median income for a household in the city was $29,792, and the median income for a family was $45,000. Males had a median income of $30,625 versus $16,563 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,744. About 3.8% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.7% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over
Rainier is a city in Thurston County, Washington, United States. Beginning as a train stop in the 1870s, Rainier was first settled in 1890, and was officially incorporated in 1947. The population was 1,794 at the 2010 census. Rainier began in the 1870s as a stop on the Northern Pacific Railroad line between Kalama, Washington and Tacoma. Situated amidst the ‘ten al quelth’ prairies (Lushootseed for "the best yet",) it was named for its view of Mount Rainier. In 1890, Albert and Maria Gehrke were the first permanent settlers to homestead in Rainier; later that year a post office was established. Rainier was officially platted in 1891. In 1896, the community's first full-time school as well as a Lutheran church were built by Albert Gehrke and his two brothers, Theodore and Paul; the buildings are now a state historic landmarks. In 1906, the Bob White Lumber Company opened, bringing prosperity to the area through logging and sawmilling. Other lumber companies, such as Deschutes, Gruber and Docherty, and Fir Tree, were soon attracted to the area as well. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, several of these mill operations and many of the local buildings were destroyed by a series of fires, leading many residents to seek work at Weyerhaeuser Lumber at nearby Vail, which is now a ghost town. Rainier's 1940 population was 500. In 1941, the WPA Guide to Washington described Rainier as "the social center for farmers and loggers of the vicinity, although its closed mills and vacant houses mark it as a ghost lumber town." Rainier was officially incorporated on October 23, 1947. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.73 square miles (4.48 km2), all of it land. In terms of land cover, 18% (179 acres) of the city is urban, 27% (267 acres (1.08 km2)) is forested, and 55% (540 acres (2.2 km2)) is covered with non-forest vegetation and soils. The climate of Rainier tends to be relatively mild. Although the temperature reached a record high of 104 Fahrenheit in 1981, the average temperature of the hottest month, August, is 77 °F. Similarly, while the record low temperature was -8 °F in 1979, the average temperature of January, the coldest month, is 32 Fahrenheit. With an average of 8.13 inches of rainfall, November is the wettest month. Rainier averages 50.8 inches of rainfall a year. As of the census of 2010, there were 1,794 people, 656 households, and 484 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,037.0 inhabitants per square mile (400.4 /km2). There were 717 housing units at an average density of 414.5 per square mile (160.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.7% White, 1.2% African American, 1.2% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from other races, and 4.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.0% of the population. There were 656 households of which 40.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.1% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.2% were non-families. 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.11. The median age in the city was 37.1 years. 26.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.2% were from 25 to 44; 29.2% were from 45 to 64; and 9.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.7% male and 50.3% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 1,492 people, 530 households, and 410 families residing in Rainier. The population density was 922.8 people per square mile (355.6/km2). There were 551 housing units at an average density of 340.8 per square mile (131.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.56% White, 0.54% African American, 1.81% Native American, 0.74% Asian, 0.27% Pacific Islander, 0.80% from other races, and 3.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.89% of the population. There were 530 households out of which 40.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.5% were non-families. 17.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.17. In the city the age distribution of the population shows 30.6% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 32.1% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 98.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.5 males. The median income for a household in Rainier was $42,955, and the median income for a family was $44,226. Males had a median income of $34,609 versus $27,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,636. About 6.6% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over. Rainier features eight acres of parks. In the center of town, the Veterans Memorial Park is dedicated to "all veterans, active duty personnel, reservists of the armed services, and members of police and fire services, and any individual or group that serves our community and country." Nearby, Wilkowksi Park is the site of the Rainier Roundup, the city's annual bluegrass music festival occurring on the fourth weekend in August. Beside the park, the Yelm–Tenino Trail connects the cities of Yelm, Rainier, and Tenino in a paved pathway for walkers and bikers. Other parks in Rainier include Gehrke Park, Holiday Park, and Raintree Park. The government of Rainier is comprised a mayor and a city council. As of 2010, the mayor of Rainier is Randall Schleis. The city council consists of councilmembers Kristin Guizzetti, Robert Shaw, Rick Succow, Christine Winslow, and Dennis McVey, who acts as Mayor Pro Tem. Other government positions in Rainier include that of City Administrator & Clerk–Treasurer Charmayne Garrison, City Attorney William Cameron, Fire Chief Mark King and Public Works Director Ronald V. Gibson. Rainier is served by the Rainier School District. The district consists of an elementary school, a middle school, and a high school. As of May 2009, the district's enrollment was 1206 students, taught by 59 teachers. As of June 2010, the superintendent of the district is Tim Garchow. As of May 2009, Rainier Elementary School was serving 555 students, grades K-5, with Paulette Johnson as principal. The enrollment of Rainier Middle School, which serves grades 6-8, was 283 as of 2009, with the principal as of 2013 being Bryon Bahr. Rainier High School, also served by Byron Bahr, included 368 students, grades 9-12, in 2009. Under the non-profit parent corporation of the Rainier Area Building Community, the Rainier Historical Society has been restoring Rainier's historic schoolhouse, which was built in 1915, and converting it into a community center known as the Lifelong Learning Center. In 2005, the Rainier Food Bank was opened at the site, serving patrons on Wednesdays and Saturdays. A thrift store was also opened, with the proceeds going to fund the operational costs of the building. An art gallery and public meeting rooms followed. In November 2009, the Rainier Volunteer Library opened at the center, featuring a collection of donated books available for borrowing. A partnership with the Timberland Regional Library brought the addition of a computer kiosk and the ability to pick up reserved books from the Timberland Regional Library system at the Rainier Volunteer Library. In the fall of 2011, the food bank, under the name Rainier Emergency Food Center, relocated to a nearby church due to safety concerns at the historic schoolhouse. Rainier hosts several annual events. In August, Rainier Roundup Days include a community parade and a bluegrass music festival. Also in August, the Rainier Community & Alumni Celebration is held to honor all past & present residents of Rainier. July 2010 marks the community's seventh annual Relay for Life, during which, over an 18-hour time frame, participants walk around the high school track to raise money for the American Cancer Society. The City of Rainier is also the home of American Legion Post 264, which hosts Memorial Day Observance and a Veteran's Day Breakfast. Post was founded in the year 2000 and has over 250 members, is active in District and Department leadership. The Post also has over 15 active service officers. The service officers are available to assist any veteran, active or reservist or family member in need. The Post currently meets at the Rainier Chapel on the 4th Thursday at 7:30 pm. last edited by Post Commander, Rob Donaldson.
Age of consent  Antisexualism
Censorship  Circumcision
Deviant sexual intercourse
Ethics  Homophobia
Miscegenation (interracial relations)
Norms  Objectification
Pornography  Public morality
Red-light district  Reproductive rights
Same-sex marriage  Striptease
Survival sex Adultery  Buggery  Child grooming
Child pornography  Child prostitution
Criminal transmission of HIV
Female genital mutilation
Incest  Pimping  Prostitution (forced)
Pedophilia  Public indecency
Rape (statutory  marital)
Seduction  Sexting  Sexual abuse (child)
Sexual assault  Sexual harassment
Slavery  Sodomy  UK Section 63 (2008)
Violence  Zoophilia The age of consent, a term which rarely actually appears in legal statutes, refers to the minimum age of a person with whom another person is permitted to engage in certain sexual activities, though it is sometimes referred as the age at which a person is considered to be legally competent to consent to sexual acts. It should not be confused with the age of majority, age of criminal responsibility, the marriageable age, the voting age, the drinking age, driving age, or other purposes. The distinguishing aspect of the age of consent laws is that the person aged below the minimum age is regarded as the victim and their sex partner as the offender. Age of consent laws vary widely from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, and while most jurisdictions set the age of consent in the range 14 to 18, ages of consent as low as 12 and as high as 21 exist. The laws may also vary by the type of sexual act, the gender of the actors, or other restrictions such as abuse of a position of trust. Some jurisdictions may also make allowances for minors engaged in sexual acts with each other, rather than a single age. Charges resulting from a breach of these laws may range from a misdemeanor such as corruption of a minor, to what is popularly called statutory rape (which is considered equivalent to rape, both in severity and sentencing). There are many "gray areas" in this area of law, some regarding unspecific and untried legislation, others brought about by debates regarding changing societal attitudes, and others due to conflicts between federal and state laws. These factors all make age of consent an often confusing subject, and a topic of highly charged debates. In traditional societies, the age of consent for a sexual union is and was a matter for the family to decide, or a tribal custom. In most cases, this coincided with signs of puberty, menstruation for a woman and pubic hair for a man. Ancient Greek poet Hesiod in "Works and Days" (c. 700BC) suggests that a man should marry around the age of thirty, and that he should take a wife who is five years past puberty. In Ancient Rome, it was very common for girls to marry and have children shortly after the onset of puberty.][ The first recorded age-of-consent law dates to 1275, in England, as part of the rape law, a statute, Westminster 1, made it a misdemeanor to "ravish" a "maiden within age," whether with or without her consent. The phrase "within age" was interpreted by jurist Sir Edward Coke as meaning the age of marriage, which at the time was 12 years of age. In the 12th century Gratian, the influential founder of Canon law in medieval Europe, accepted age of puberty for marriage to be between 12 and 14 but acknowledged consent to be meaningful if the children were older than 7. There were authorities that said that consent could take place earlier. Marriage would then be valid as long as neither of the two parties annulled the marital agreement before reaching puberty, or if they had already consummated the marriage. It should be noted that Judges honored marriages based on mutual consent at ages younger than 7, in spite of what Gratian had said; there are recorded marriages of 2 and 3 year olds. The American colonies followed the English tradition, and the law was more of a guide. For example, Mary Hathaway (Virginia, 1689) was only 9 when she was married to William Williams. Sir Edward Coke (England, 17th century) "made it clear that the marriage of girls under 12 was normal, and the age at which a girl who was a wife was eligible for a dower from her husband's estate was 9 even though her husband be only four years old." Reliable data for when people would actually marry is very difficult to find. In England for example, the only reliable data on age at marriage in the early modern period comes from records involving only those who left property after their death. Not only were the records relatively rare, but not all bothered to record the participants' ages, and it seemed that the more complete the records are, the more likely they are to reveal young marriages. Additionally, 20th and 21st centuries' historians have sometimes shown reluctance to accept data regarding young ages of marriage, and would instead explain the data away as a misreading by a later copier of the records. Social (and the resulting legal) attitudes toward the appropriate age below which girls especially should not be permitted to engage in sexual activity have drifted upwards in modern times. For example, while ages from 10 to 13 were typically acceptable in Western countries during the mid-19th century, the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century were marked by changing attitudes towards sexuality and childhood resulting in raising the ages of consent to around 16. In the 16th century, a small number of Italian and German states set the minimum age for sexual intercourse for girls, setting it at 12 years. Towards the end of the 18th century, other European countries also began to enact similar laws. The first French Constitution of 1791 established the minimum age at 11 years. Portugal, Spain, Denmark and the Swiss cantons, initially set the minimum age at 10–12 years. Historically, the English common law set the age of consent to range from 10 to 12. Most states of the United States, as late as the 1880s, set the minimum age at 10–12, and in one state, Delaware, the minimum age was 7. A New York Times article states that it was still aged 7 in Delaware in 1895. Female reformers and advocates of social purity initiated a campaign in 1885 in the United States which petitioned legislators to raise the legal minimum age to at least 16, with the ultimate goal to raise the age to 18. The campaign was successful, with almost all states raising the minimum age to 16–18 years by 1920. In France, Portugal, Spain, Denmark and the Swiss cantons and other countries, the minimum age was raised to between 13 and 16 years in the second half of the 19th century. Though the original arguments for raising the age of consent was based on morality, since then the raison d'être of the laws has changed to child welfare and a so-called right to childhood or innocence. Sexual relations with a person under the age of consent is a crime in most countries. Jurisdictions use a variety of terms for the offence, including child sexual abuse, statutory rape, illegal carnal knowledge, corruption of a minor, besides others. The enforcement practices of age-of-consent laws vary depending on the social sensibilities of the particular culture (see above). Often, enforcement is not exercised to the letter of the law, with legal action being taken only when a sufficiently socially-unacceptable age gap exists between the two individuals, or if the perpetrator is in a position of power over the minor (e.g., a teacher, minister, or doctor). The sex of each participant can also influence perceptions of an individual's guilt and therefore enforcement. The threshold age for engaging in sexual activity varies between jurisdictions (see below). Most jurisdictions have set a fixed age of consent. However, some jurisdictions permit sex with a person after their puberty, including Yemen, but only in marriage, the state of Nayarit (in Mexico) and Bolivia. This was also the case of the Russian Soviet Federal Socialist Republic (RSFSR) and other Soviet republics during the Soviet era. Some countries outlaw all sexual intercourse outside of marriage irrespective of age. The age of consent is a legal barrier to the minor's ability to consent and therefore obtaining consent is not in general a defense to having sexual relations with a person under the prescribed age, for example: Some countries have age of consent laws which apply not only to acts committed within the country, but also to those committed by its citizens or inhabitants while they are on foreign soil. For example, a federal United States law bans sexual activity by its citizens with foreigners or with a US citizens from another state, if any of the partners is under 18. This applies in cases where any of the partners travels into or out of the United States, or from one state into another, for the purpose of a sexual encounter. The United States also applies this law in cases where the age of consent is lower than the age of both partners in both the states or countries involved. The age at which a person can be legally married can differ from the age of consent. In jurisdictions where the marriageable age is lower than the age of consent, those laws usually override the age of consent laws in the case of a married couple where one or both partners are below the age of consent. Some jurisdictions prohibit all sex outside of marriage irrespective of age, as in the case of Yemen. In some countries the age of consent may be lower than the age at which a person can appear in pornographic images and films. In many jurisdictions, the minimum age for participation and even viewing such material is 18. Films and images showing individuals under the age of 18 in some jurisdictions may be classified as child pornography, even though the legal age of consent in those jurisdictions is lower. For example, in the United States under federal law it is a crime to film minors below 18 in sexual acts, even in states where the age of consent is below 18. In those states of the United States where the age of consent is lower, charges such as child pornography can be used as alternatives. In many countries there are specific laws dealing with child prostitution. Age-of-consent reform refers to the efforts of some individuals or groups, for different reasons, to alter or abolish age-of-consent laws. These efforts advocate five main positions: Specific jurisdictions' laws relating to age of consent can be found, organized by region, on the following pages:
Sunnyside is a city in Yakima County, Washington, United States. As of the 2010 census the population was 15,858. On September 16, 1902, residents voted 42 to one to incorporate as the town of Sunnyside. By state law a town needed to have 300 citizens in order to legally incorporate. With 314 residents, Sunnyside was just eligible to legally vote for incorporation. The first mayor of Sunnyside was the town druggist James Henderson. The settlement was originally founded by Walter Granger in 1893. The name "Sunnyside" was coined by a merchant named W. H. Cline. Granger was involved in the financing and construction of the Sunnyside Canal which would allow Yakima River water to irrigate the area. However, due to the Panic of 1893, Granger's creditors foreclosed on the canal, and the town's population dwindled to seven families. However, by the end of 1901, the population had doubled, finally exceeding 300 people. The townsite contained "1 bank, 11 stores, 3 hotels, 1 newspaper, 2 blacksmith shops, 2 livery barns, 3 churches, and a large and growing school." Sunnyside's population increase at this time was stimulated by the immigration of the Dunkards from South Dakota who were moving to the town. The population of Dunkards was of such notable size that by 1902 it was noted that they had "built a commodious place of worship at Sunnyside" which was the largest church in Yakima County at the time. The Dunkards, members of the German Baptist Progressive Brethren, relocated to Sunnyside in order to form what they called the Christian Cooperative Colony. The Brethren bought the entire town site and were the developers of its first bank, and a telephone system. They enforced clauses prohibiting alcohol, dancing, and gambling as a condition on every parcel of land sold. Because of this, old maps of Washington identify the town with a cross or halo symbol. Later, in the 1930s, refugees from the Dust Bowl also moved to Sunnyside. Under the leadership of mayor William Bright "Billy" Cloud (1870–1959), Sunnyside initiated a project to pave its dirt streets on June 5, 1917. This project was necessary since years of irrigation had raised the water table to the point that the streets had become unbearably muddy. The cost of the entire project was $62,629.45. In 1948, Sunnyside became the first city in the State of Washington to adopt the Council-manager plan of government (see ). This plan provides for an elected city council which is responsible for policy making, and a professional city manager, appointed by the council, who is responsible for administration. The city manager provides policy advice, directs the daily operations of city government, handles personnel functions (including the power to appoint and remove employees) and is responsible for preparing the city budget. Under the council-manager statutes, the city council is prohibited from interfering with the manager's administration. The city manager; however, is directly accountable to and can be removed by a majority vote of the council at any time. Sunnyside was awarded the distinction of being an All-America City in 1979. First held in 1989, the 'Lighted Farm Implement Parade has been called "the NW's premier lighted parade." Usually taking place in early December, the parade includes "farm implements: combines, boom trucks, sprayers, swathers, grape pickers, and all types of tractors" decorated with colorful lights. The 2006 edition of the event had more than 70 parade entrants. The A&E network once named the event one of the "Top 10" such parades in the United States. The parade was the first of its kind in the Yakima Valley. The Darigold Dairy Fair manufactures cheese, (150 million pounds of cheese annually) but is mostly noted for its colorful facade and circus-like decorations, which include a pair of cows swinging on a flying trapeze. Located downtown, the museum houses and displays artifacts and documents with a focus on daily life in Sunnyside during its early years. The building housing the museum was donated to the city by the family of Walter C. Ball & Sons, the local undertaking business which was also among the pioneering families that founded Sunnyside. The Sunnyside Memorial Cemetery, founded by the Ball Family, is located north of town. The lone structure at that location was designed by Percy Ball to resemble Chingford Church in Walthamstow, England where Walter C. Ball and his wife Amelia grew up together. This building was used to house the retort for cremations until it fell into disrepair. The family plots of the Ball family are located on the east side of the structure. Many of the original school buildings in Sunnyside, and the town of Outlook just northwest of town, have either burned to the ground or been demolished to make way for bigger and better structures. One of the original structures still in use is the Lincoln School Building which sits at the intersection of Lincoln and Sixth Street. Erected in 1927, it is a two story structure with an adjacent gymnasium attached to the east wing of the building. In 1928, female teachers were not allowed to marry. Doing so would void their contract to teach. The land that Lincoln School sits on was donated to the school district by H. Lloyd Miller in 1926. He and his wife later donated the land next to it between the school and 9th Ave. to be used for play fields for the students. Lincoln still remains as one of the oldest buildings in the school district. It has been remodeled and renovated to accommodate the administrative offices for the district. It also houses classrooms for kindergarten. Sunnyside has one public library. The original public library, a Carnegie Library, was built in 1911. It was replaced in 1964 with the current library building. It is the second largest library in the Yakima Valley Regional Library System and has one of the largest Spanish language collections in the system. Sunnyside is located at (46.320798, -120.012232). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.63 square miles (17.17 km2), all of it land. Sunnyside lies approximately 180 miles away from Seattle to the west, Spokane to the east, and Portland to the southwest. As of the census of 2010, there were 15,858 people, 4,332 households, and 3,428 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,391.9 inhabitants per square mile (923.5 /km2). There were 4,556 housing units at an average density of 687.2 per square mile (265.3 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 43.4% White, 0.3% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 52.3% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 82.2% of the population. There were 4,332 households of which 57.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 21.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 8.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 20.9% were non-families. 17.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.60 and the average family size was 4.02. The median age in the city was 25 years. 38.5% of residents were under the age of 18; 11.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.4% were from 25 to 44; 15.3% were from 45 to 64; and 8.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.1% male and 49.9% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 13,905 people, 3,827 households, and 3,000 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,340.4 people per square mile (903.8/km²). There were 4,070 housing units at an average density of 685.0 per square mile (264.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 42.61% White, 0.40% African American, 0.63% Native American, 0.69% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 52.58% from other races, and 3.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 73.05% of the population. There were 3,827 households out of which 50.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.1% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 18.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.58 and the average family size was 4.02. In the city the age distribution of the population shows 38.1% under the age of 18, 11.7% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 14.0% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.7 males. The median income for a household in the city was $27,583, and the median income for a family was $28,304. Males had a median income of $25,187 versus $25,779 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,366. About 29.1% of families and 34.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 46.2% of those under age 18 and 18.1% of those age 65 or over.
The legal drinking age is the age at which a person can consume or purchase alcoholic food or alcoholic beverages. These laws cover a wide range of issues and behaviours, addressing when and where alcohol can be consumed. The minimum age alcohol can be legally consumed can be different from the age when it can be purchased. These laws vary among different countries and many laws have exemptions or special circumstances. Most laws apply only to drinking alcohol in public places, with alcohol consumption in the home being mostly unregulated. Some countries also have different age limits for different types of alcoholic drinks. The United Kingdom is the only country that has a minimum legal age for drinking alcohol in a home. Some Islamic nations prohibit Muslims, or both Muslims and non-Muslims, from drinking alcohol at any age. In some countries, it is not illegal for minors to drink alcohol but the alcohol can be seized without compensation. In some cases, it is illegal to sell or give alcohol to minors. The following list indicates the age of the person for whom it is legal to consume and purchase alcohol. Federal law explicitly provides for religious, medical, employment and private club possession exceptions; as of 2005, 31 states have family member and/or location exceptions to their underage possession laws. However, non-alcoholic beer in many (but not all) states, such as Idaho, Texas, and Maryland, is considered legal for those under the age of 21. By a judge's ruling, South Carolina appears to allow the possession and consumption of alcohol by childrens 2 years of age, but a circuit court judge said otherwise. The State of Wisconsin allows the consumption of alcohol in the presence of parents. Some U.S. States have legislation that make providing to and possession of alcohol by persons under 21 a gross misdemeanor with a potential of $5,000 and a year in jail (or more). Police may search minors in public places and confiscate or destroy any alcoholic beverages in their possession. Incidents are reported to the legal guardian and social authorities, who may intervene with child welfare procedures. In addition, those aged 15 or above are subject to a fine. In private, offering alcohol to a minor is considered a criminal offence if it results in drunkenness and the act can be deemed reprehensible as a whole, considering the minor's age, degree of maturity and other circumstances. Alcohol may be sold in stores between 08:00 and 20:00 on weekdays, and Saturdays between 08:00 and 18:00. Alcoholic beverages containing more than 4,75 % ABV are sold in Vinmonopolet. In Vinmonopolet alcohol may be sold between 08:00 and 18:00 during week days, and between 08:00 and 15:00 the day before Sunday or religious holidays. Alcohol with more than 60% ABV is considered illegal narcotics. Alcohol possessed by minors may be confiscated as evidence. Drinking in public is prohibited, though this is rarely enforced in recreational areas. It is illegal to sell alcohol to people under 18, the fine being between €30,000 and €600,000. Stores are not allowed to sell alcohol between 10 p.m. and 9 a.m without a specific license, after a recent law was passed. Between the ages of 5 and 17, it is legally permissible for children to drink alcohol at home or at a friend's house with the permission of a parent or legal guardian. The minimum age for the purchase of alcohol is 18. People aged 16 or 17 may consume wine, beer or cider on licensed premises when ordered with a meal. In England and Wales, it must be an adult who orders; however, an adult doesn't have to be present to order alcohol with a meal in Scotland. The legal age for the purchase of alcohol from an off-licence (store/supermarket) is 18. (The legal age to buy liqueur chocolates is 16, but this is rarely enforced.) Under the BBPA's Challenge 21 scheme, customers attempting to buy alcoholic beverages are asked to prove their age if in the retailer's opinion they look under 21 even though the law states they must be a minimum of 18. Many supermarket and off-licence chains display Challenge 21 notices stating that they will not serve persons who look under 21 without ID. Supermarkets or off-licence chains that are found to have violated the law and have repeatedly sold alcohol to underage persons are then required to adopt the Challenge 25 scheme. Failing to adhere to this will result in revocation of the licence to sell alcohol. (Challenge 25 is standard procedure in Scotland and the main supermarket chains.) Purchasing alcohol on behalf of a minor is illegal in all of the United Kingdom. This means acting as the young person's agent.
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