Question:

How were cans opened before can openers were invented?

Answer:

The first tin cans were so thick they had to be hammered open. As cans became thinner, it became possible to invent dedicated can openers. In 1858, Ezra Warner of Waterbury, Connecticut patented the first can opener.

More Info:

A tin can, tin (especially in British English, Australian English and Canadian English ), steel can, steel packaging or a can, is a container for the distribution or storage of goods, composed of thin metal. Many cans require opening by cutting the "end" open; others have removable covers. Cans hold diverse contents: foods, beverages, oil, chemicals, etc. Metal cans are not used as shipping containers.

Steel cans are made of tinplate (tin-coated steel) or tin-free steel. In some locations, even aluminium cans are called "tin cans".

A tin can, tin (especially in British English, Australian English and Canadian English ), steel can, steel packaging or a can, is a container for the distribution or storage of goods, composed of thin metal. Many cans require opening by cutting the "end" open; others have removable covers. Cans hold diverse contents: foods, beverages, oil, chemicals, etc. Metal cans are not used as shipping containers.

Steel cans are made of tinplate (tin-coated steel) or tin-free steel. In some locations, even aluminium cans are called "tin cans".

Destroyer Canning

Coordinates: 35.90917°N 79.04694°W / 35.90917; -79.04694 / 35°54′33″N 79°2′49″W

Officially named the Indoor Athletic Center (or Court), the Tin Can was the home of North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball from the 1924 season until the team's relocation to the Woollen Gymnasium in 1938. It replaced Bynum Gymnasium, a venue known for its unusual running track suspended above the court.

A tin can telephone is a type of acoustic (non-electrical) speech-transmitting device made up of two tin cans, paper cups or similarly shaped items attached to either end of a taut string or wire.

It is a form of mechanical telephony, where sound is converted into and then conveyed by vibrations along a liquid or solid medium, and then reconverted back to sound.

A tin can wall is a wall constructed from tin cans, which are not a common building source. The cans can be laid in concrete, stacked vertically on top of each other, and crushed or cut and flattened to be used as shingles. They can also be used for furniture.

Tin cans can form the actual fill-in structure (or walls) of a building, as is done with earthships. Tin cans have not been around for a long time, and neither have their building methods. The two main structural methods for building with tin cans are by laying them horizontally in a concrete matrix and by stacking them vertically.

Tin Can Bay is a town in south-east Queensland, Australia. The seaside town is located on a deep but narrow sheltered inlet in the Gympie local government area, 218 kilometres north of the state capital, Brisbane. At the 2006 census, Tin Can Bay had a population of 1,918.

It is suggested that the town's name derives from the indigenous word, "Tuncanbar", thought to refer to the dugongs that frequent the inlet. European settlement began in the 1870s as the point where logs would be floated to the timber mills at Maryborough. Tin Can Bay later became, and still remains, an important fishing port, with a focus on prawns as well as recreational fishing. There is an excellent public boat ramp into Snapper Creek with boat-washing facilities and ample trailer parking.

Coordinates: 49.9122556°N 97.1341472°W / 49.9122556; -97.1341472 / 49°54′44.12″N 97°08′2.93″W

The Tin Can Cathedral (Ukrainian: Бляшана Катедра) was the first independent Ukrainian church in North America. It was the heart of the Seraphimite Church. Founded in Winnipeg, it had no affiliation with any church in Europe.

Tin Can Trust is a 2010 album by the band Los Lobos, and is the band's first collection of new original material since 2006. It features rock 'n' roll, blues, two Spanish-language tracks, and a Grateful Dead cover song. The album was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Americana Album.

All songs written by David Hidalgo & Louie Perez, except indicated.

Tin Can Beach

A can opener (in North American English and Australian English) or tin opener (in British and Commonwealth English) is a device used to open tin cans (metal cans). Although preservation of food using tin cans had been practiced since at least 1772 in the Netherlands, the first can openers were patented only in 1855 in England and in 1858 in the United States. Those openers were basically variations of a knife, and the 1855 design continues to be produced. The first can opener consisting of the now familiar sharp rotating cutting wheel, which travels around the can's ring slicing open the lid, was invented in 1870 but people found it difficult to operate. A breakthrough came in 1925 when a second, serrated wheel was added to hold the cutting wheel on the ring of the can. This easy to use design has become one of the most popular can opener models.

Around the time of World War II, several can openers were developed for military use, such as the American P-38 and P-51. These featured a robust and simple design where a folding cutting blade and absence of a handle significantly reduced the opener size. Electric can openers were introduced in the late 1950s and met with success. The development of new can opener types continues with the recent addition of a side-cutting model.

A can opener (in North American English and Australian English) or tin opener (in British and Commonwealth English) is a device used to open tin cans (metal cans). Although preservation of food using tin cans had been practiced since at least 1772 in the Netherlands, the first can openers were patented only in 1855 in England and in 1858 in the United States. Those openers were basically variations of a knife, and the 1855 design continues to be produced. The first can opener consisting of the now familiar sharp rotating cutting wheel, which travels around the can's ring slicing open the lid, was invented in 1870 but people found it difficult to operate. A breakthrough came in 1925 when a second, serrated wheel was added to hold the cutting wheel on the ring of the can. This easy to use design has become one of the most popular can opener models.

Around the time of World War II, several can openers were developed for military use, such as the American P-38 and P-51. These featured a robust and simple design where a folding cutting blade and absence of a handle significantly reduced the opener size. Electric can openers were introduced in the late 1950s and met with success. The development of new can opener types continues with the recent addition of a side-cutting model.

Diving

A spinal lock is a multiple joint lock applied to the spinal column, which is performed by forcing the spine beyond its normal ranges of motion. This is typically done by bending or twisting the head or upper body into abnormal positions. Commonly, spinal locks might strain the spinal musculature or result in a mild spinal sprain, while a forcefully and/or suddenly applied spinal lock may cause severe ligament damage or damage to the vertebrae, and possibly result in serious spinal cord injury, strokes, or death.

Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks.

The P-38, developed in 1942, is a small can opener that was issued in the canned field rations of the United States Armed Forces from World War II to the 1980s. Originally designed for and distributed in the K-ration, it was later included in the C-ration. As of 2013, it is still in production and sold on a worldwide market.

The P-38 is known as a "John Wayne" by the United States Marine Corps, either because of its toughness and dependability, or because of an unsubstantiated story that the actor had been shown in an as-yet-unidentified training film opening a can of K-Rations. The can opener is pocket-sized, approximately 1.5 inches (38 mm) long, and consists of a short metal blade that serves as a handle, with a small, hinged metal tooth that folds out to pierce the can lid. A notch just under the hinge point keeps the opener hooked around the rim of the can as the device is "walked" around to cut the lid out. A larger version called the P-51 is somewhat easier to operate. The handle portion can also double as a flat-blade screwdriver.

"Assume a can opener" is a catchphrase used to mock professionals, particularly economists, who base their conclusions on unrealistic or unlikely assumptions. It derives from an old joke:

A physicist, a chemist and an economist are stranded on an island, with nothing to eat. A can of soup washes ashore. The physicist says, "Let's smash the can open with a rock." The chemist says, "Let's build a fire and heat the can first." The economist says, "Let's assume that we have a can-opener..."

The third season of the American sitcom The Big Bang Theory was originally aired on CBS from September 21, 2009 to May 24, 2010 with 23 episodes. It has received higher ratings than the previous two seasons with over 15 million viewers. The Complete Third Season DVD erroneously credits Mark Cendrowski for directing nearly the entire season.]citation needed[ Season three starts three months after the end of season two when the guys left for the North Pole.

Penny throws herself at Leonard after he returns from three months at the North Pole and they begin a relationship that lasts most of the season, Penny and Sheldon start a quirky friendship though she can still annoy him, Wil Wheaton begins appearing as Sheldon's arch enemy and breaks up Leonard and Penny, Howard begins to date Bernadette Rostenkowski and at the end of the season Sheldon meets Amy Farrah Fowler.

A tin can, tin (especially in British English, Australian English and Canadian English ), steel can, steel packaging or a can, is a container for the distribution or storage of goods, composed of thin metal. Many cans require opening by cutting the "end" open; others have removable covers. Cans hold diverse contents: foods, beverages, oil, chemicals, etc. Metal cans are not used as shipping containers.

Steel cans are made of tinplate (tin-coated steel) or tin-free steel. In some locations, even aluminium cans are called "tin cans".

William Worcester Lyman (March 29, 1821 – Nov 15, 1891) was an American inventor from Meriden, Connecticut. He is credited with inventing the first rotating wheel can opener.

William Lyman was born in 1821 in Middlefield, Connecticut. At the age of 15 he was apprenticed to the local company Griswold & Couch, located in Meriden, Connecticut, to learn pewtersmithery, and worked there until 1844. After that, he continued working as a pewtersmith with various local companies until 1880. In 1849, he was appointed as State Representative in Meriden. On September 5, 1841 William married Roxanne Griswold Frary, a local woman one year older than he was. He died in Meriden in 1891 at the age of 70.

The C-Ration, or Type C ration, was an individual canned, pre-cooked, and prepared wet ration. It was intended to be issued to U.S. military land forces when fresh food (A-ration) or packaged unprepared food (B-Ration) prepared in mess halls or field kitchens was impractical or not available, and when a survival ration (K-ration or D-ration) was insufficient. Development began in 1938 with the first rations being field tested in 1940 and wide-scale adoption following soon after. Operational conditions often caused the C-ration to be standardized for field issue regardless of environmental suitability or weight limitations.

The C ration was replaced in 1958 with the Meal Combat Individual (MCI). Although officially a new ration, the MCI was derived from and very similar to the original C ration, and in fact continued to be called "C rations" by American troops throughout its production life as a combat ration (1958–1980). Although the replacement for the MCI, the MRE, was formally adopted as the Department of Defense combat ration in 1975, the first large-scale production test did not occur until in 1978 with the first MRE I rations packed and delivered in 1981. While the MRE officially replaced the MCI in 1981, previously packed MCI rations continued to be issued until depleted.

The Field Ration Eating Device (commonly abbreviated to "FRED") is a small device which is a combination of a can opener, a bottle opener and a spoon. It is issued to the Australian Defence Force in its CR1M ration packs. It is also known widely as the "Fucking' Ridiculous Eating Device".

The can opener is very similar in design to the US military P-38 can opener.

Ezra Warner Ezra Warner

Ezra Joseph Warner III (July 4, 1910 – May 30, 1974) was a noted historian of the American Civil War. He was born in Lake Forest, Illinois and lived in La Jolla, California where he worked as an investment counselor. He was the son of Ezra J. Warner, Jr. and grandson of Ezra J Warner, who were wholesale grocery business executives in Chicago, Illinois. His father, Ezra J. Warner, Jr., was president & treasurer of wholesale grocery business Sprague, Warner & Company and vice president of the Chicago Orchestral Association. His mother was the former Marion Hall. He married Rosamond Moore in 1932 but his wife is identified on their tombstone as Dorothy P. Warner. He is buried in Lake Forest Cemetery, Lake Forest, Illinois. His great uncle was Union General James M. Warner.]citation needed[

Ezra J. Warner III is well known for his work in Civil War biography. His works included:

Ezra J. Warner of Waterbury, Connecticut was an American inventor, who patented his design of a can opener in 1858. Crudely shaped bayonet and sickle combo, his design was widely accepted by the U.S. military during the period of the American Civil War.

Can openers were needed because early cans were robust containers, which weighed more than food and required ingenuity to open, using whatever tools available. The instruction on those cans read "Cut round the top near the outer edge with a chisel and hammer." The bayonet part of Ezra Warner's can opener was pressed into the can, and a metal guard kept it from penetrating too far into the can. The other part was the sickle, which was forced into the can and sawed around the edge. However, Warner’s can opener was not a tool for domestic use, because it could be dangerous. Grocers opened the cans before they left the store. The first widespread domestic can opener was patented by William Lyman.

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Ezra-Levi Wood Warner Wood Place is an historic house at 165 Depot Road in Westminster, Massachusetts.

Edwin M. Stanton
Ulysses S. Grant
William T. Sherman
David Farragut
David D. Porter

Judah P. Benjamin
Robert E. Lee
Joseph E. Johnston
Raphael Semmes
Josiah Tattnall

Samuel McGowan (October 19, 1819 – August 9, 1897) was a general from South Carolina in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He commanded a brigade in A.P. Hill's famous "Light Division" and was wounded several times. Ezra Warner's book, Generals in Gray, claims that "McGowan's career and reputation were not excelled by any other brigade commander in the Army of Northern Virginia."

Born in the Laurens District of South Carolina, McGowan attended and graduated from South Carolina College in 1841, where he was a member of the Clariosophic Society. Subsequently, he studied law in Abbeville and was admitted to the bar. Prior to the Civil War, McGowan practiced law and served in state politics. He also served in the Mexican-American War with the Palmetto Rifles. He was commended for his gallantry near Mexico City and rose to the rank of staff captain.

Warner

Victor Jean Baptiste Girardey (June 26, 1837 – August 16, 1864) was a Confederate States Army staff officer during the American Civil War. He was promoted from captain to temporary brigadier general less than a month before his death in battle. Girardey had served as a staff officer from the beginning of the war until August 3, 1864. Then, he was promoted to temporary brigadier general, to rank from July 30, 1864, and assumed command of Ambrose R. Wright's former brigade on the Darbytown Road on the eastern end of the defenses of Richmond, Virginia. On August 16, 1864, during the Second Battle of Deep Bottom, Girardey was killed in action near Fussell's Mill in Henrico County, Virginia.

Victor Jean Baptiste Girardey was born on June 26, 1837 at Lauw, France. His family emigrated to Georgia in 1842. By the age of 16, he was an orphan. He completed his education in New Orleans, Louisiana, where he married a Louisiana woman of French descent.

A can opener (in North American English and Australian English) or tin opener (in British and Commonwealth English) is a device used to open tin cans (metal cans). Although preservation of food using tin cans had been practiced since at least 1772 in the Netherlands, the first can openers were patented only in 1855 in England and in 1858 in the United States. Those openers were basically variations of a knife, and the 1855 design continues to be produced. The first can opener consisting of the now familiar sharp rotating cutting wheel, which travels around the can's ring slicing open the lid, was invented in 1870 but people found it difficult to operate. A breakthrough came in 1925 when a second, serrated wheel was added to hold the cutting wheel on the ring of the can. This easy to use design has become one of the most popular can opener models.

Around the time of World War II, several can openers were developed for military use, such as the American P-38 and P-51. These featured a robust and simple design where a folding cutting blade and absence of a handle significantly reduced the opener size. Electric can openers were introduced in the late 1950s and met with success. The development of new can opener types continues with the recent addition of a side-cutting model.

Nathaniel James Jackson (July 28, 1818 – April 21, 1892) was an American machinist and soldier. He served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War, in which he was wounded three times. After the war Jackson operated a mine.

Nathaniel J. Jackson was born in the coastal town of Newburyport located in Essex County, Massachusetts. When he was young he was taught "the machinist's trade" and by 1861 he was superintendent of the Hill mill in Lewiston, Maine. Jackson also was active in the Maine State Militia, and would command some of those militiamen early in the American Civil War during his first two commands.

Waterbury

Waterbury (nicknamed the "Brass City") is a city in the U.S. state of Connecticut on the Naugatuck River, 33 miles (53 km) southwest of Hartford and 77 miles (124 km) northeast of New York City. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 110,366 and is the ninth largest city in New England, the fifth-largest city in Connecticut and the second largest city in New Haven County. At 90 minutes from Manhattan, Waterbury is part of the New York Metropolitan Area.

Throughout the first half of the 20th century Waterbury had large industrial interests and was the leading center in the United States for the manufacture of brassware (including castings and finishings), as reflected in the nickname the "Brass City" and the city's motto Quid Aere Perennius? ("What Is More Lasting Than Brass?"), which echoes the Latin of Horace's Ode 3.30. It was noted for the manufacture of watches and clocks.

Crosby High School is a public high school located in the East End section of the city of Waterbury, Connecticut. It is part of the Waterbury Public Schools district. It has an enrollment of approximately 1368 students. Originally located at 255 East Main Street in Waterbury, it moved to 300 Pierpont Road in September, 1974. It is attached to Wallace Middle School.


The Hillside Historic District in Waterbury, Connecticut is a 106-acre (43 ha) historic district that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) in 1987.

In 1987, it included 395 buildings deemed to contribute to the historic character of the area, and one other contributing structure.

The Bank Street Historic District is a group of four attached brick commercial buildings in different architectural styles on that street in Waterbury, Connecticut, United States. They were built over a 20-year period around the end of the 19th century, when Waterbury was a prosperous, growing industrial center. In 1983 they were recognized as a historic district and listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Among the four is a rare Queen Anne Style commercial building, and one of the only three Richardsonian Romanesque commercial buildings in the city. Some of Waterbury's leading architects of the time were among the designers. The four have remained intact even as later, modern development interceded between them and the contemporary buildings elsewhere downtown.

Holy Cross High School is a Catholic secondary school founded in Waterbury, Connecticut in 1968 by the Congregation of Holy Cross. Presently, Holy Cross is the largest Catholic secondary school in Connecticut, situated on thirty seven acres in the West End of Waterbury, Connecticut, accessible via Route 8 and I-84. It is not part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford.

Holy Cross has a total enrollment of just over 700 students and an average class size of 170 students. Originally an all-boys institution, it became co-educational in 1975 when it merged with the Waterbury Catholic High School, an all-girls school. The Holy Cross High School campus maintains a campus eclipsing Wi-Fi signal, a computer-equipped, Internet-connected library, a large instrumental and choral music room with adjacent practice rooms, science labs, a multimillion dollar state-of-the-art foreign language lab, a guidance complex, a 750-seat tiered auditorium, a full-service cafeteria, a gymnasium, the Stephen J. Ross Fitness Center, and state-of-the-art digital classrooms and art studios in a recently constructed two million dollar Alex Family Gallery Art and Technology Center.

The Downtown Waterbury Historic District is the core of the city of Waterbury, Connecticut, United States. It is a roughly rectangular area centered on West Main Street and Waterbury Green, the remnant of the original town commons, which has been called "one of the most attractive downtown parks in New England."

The Green was the city's first center, with the buildings around it representing all types of uses, from residences to churches to public buildings. Many early buildings were cleared as the city grew and industrialized. Nearby Exchange Place, the junction of the city's streetcar lines, later emerged as a center for retailing. A devastating 1902 fire in that area led to more clearing and rebuilding. In its wake the city's government buildings were moved to a new municipal complex on Grand Street designed by Cass Gilbert, in accordance with the principles of the City Beautiful movement.

The Waterbury Union Station building is located on Meadow Street in the city of Waterbury, Connecticut, United States. It is a brick building dating to the first decade of the 20th century. Its tall clock tower, built by the Seth Thomas Company, is the city's most prominent landmark.

Designed by the New York City architectural firm of McKim, Mead and White for the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, it handled 66 passenger trains a day at its peak. Later in the 20th century, when the city's rail service had declined to its current level of one commuter route, the building's interior was closed. Today it is in use again as the offices of the Republican-American, Waterbury's daily newspaper.

John F. Kennedy High School is a high school located in the city of Waterbury, Connecticut, in the United States.

Fall Season:

Waterbury, Connecticut
United States

The Basilica of the Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic church located at 74 West Main Street in Waterbury, Connecticut.

Waterbury Airport (FAA LID: N41), is located in Waterbury, Connecticut, United States.

Waterbury Airport is situated four miles north of the central business district, and contains two runways. The longer runway, 17/35, is turf measuring 2,005 x 135 ft (611 x 41 m).

Connecticut Connecticut

The University of Connecticut (UConn) is a public research university in Connecticut. Known as a Public Ivy, UConn was founded in 1881 and is a Land Grant and Sea Grant college & member of the Space Grant Consortium. The institution serves more than 30,000 students on its six campuses, including more than 8,000 graduate students in multiple programs.

UConn's main campus is in Storrs, Connecticut. The university's president is Susan Herbst.

The Connecticut River is the longest river in the New England region of the United States. Flowing roughly north-south for 410 miles (660 km) through four U.S. states, the Connecticut rises at the U.S. border with Quebec, Canada, and discharges at Long Island Sound. Its watershed encompasses five U.S. states and one Canadian province - 11,260 square miles (29,200 km2) - via 148 tributaries, 38 of which are major rivers. Discharging at 19,600 cubic feet (560 m3) per second, the Connecticut produces 70% of the Long Island Sound's freshwater. The Connecticut River Valley is home to some of the northeastern United States' most productive farmland, as well as a metropolitan region of approximately 2 million people surrounding the river's largest city, Springfield, Massachusetts, and the state of Connecticut's capital, Hartford.

The word "Connecticut" is a French corruption of the Mohegan word quinetucket, which means "beside the long, tidal river". The word "Connecticut" came into existence during the early 1600s, describing the river, which was also called simply "The Great River".

0213160

Hartford is the capital of the U.S. state of Connecticut and the historic seat of Hartford County until Connecticut disbanded county government in 1960. As of the 2010 Census, Hartford's population was 124,775, making it Connecticut's fourth-largest city after the coastal cities of Bridgeport, New Haven, and Stamford.

The Connecticut Sun is a professional basketball team based in Uncasville, Connecticut, playing in the Eastern Conference in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). The team was founded in Orlando, Florida before the inception of the 1999 season; the team moved to Connecticut prior to the 2003 season. The Sun is owned by the Mohegan Indian Tribe, and was the first WNBA franchise to have the distinction of not being affiliated with an NBA counterpart. Capitalizing on the popularity of women's basketball in the state as a result of the success of the UConn Huskies, the Sun also held the distinction of being the only WNBA franchise not to share its market with an NBA team from 2003 until the Seattle SuperSonics relocated, leaving the Storm as an independent team in Seattle. Currently, the Sun is the only WNBA franchise (besides the defunct Miami Sol) to finish each season with fewer than 20 losses. The Sun is considered by many to be the most successful franchise in the WNBA yet to have won a championship.

The Sun has qualified for the WNBA Playoffs in eight of its eleven years in Connecticut. The Sun has featured such notable players as the late 7-foot-2 Margo Dydek, Indiana native Katie Douglas, veteran sharpshooter Kara Lawson, University of Connecticut icons Asjha Jones and Nykesha Sales, 2008 MVP runner-up point guard Lindsay Whalen and 2012 MVP recipient Tina Charles. In 2004 and 2005, the Sun went to the WNBA Finals but fell short to Seattle and Sacramento, respectively.

navy , white , red , and gray

The Connecticut Huskies women's basketball team represents the University of Connecticut in Storrs, Connecticut in NCAA women's basketball competition. They currently play in the American Athletic Conference (The Ameican, the successor to the Big East). Under head coach Geno Auriemma, the Huskies have won 8 NCAA Division I national championships, advanced to 14 Final Fours, and won over 30 Big East regular season and tournament championships. UConn has also been one of the leaders in women's basketball attendance and has produced numerous Olympians and WNBA All-Stars. The team plays its home games at the Harry A. Gampel Pavilion in Storrs, Connecticut and the XL Center in Hartford.

The Connecticut Colony or Colony of Connecticut was an English colony located in North America that became the U.S. state of Connecticut. Originally known as the River Colony, it was organized on March 3, 1636 as a haven for Puritan gentlemen. After early struggles with the Dutch, the English had gained control of the colony permanently by the late 1630s. The colony was later the scene of a bloody and raging war between the English and Indians, known as the Pequot War. It played a significant role in the establishment of self-government in the New World with its refusal to surrender local authority to the Dominion of New England, an event known as the Charter Oak incident which occurred at Jeremy Adams' inn & tavern.

Two other English colonies in the present-day state of Connecticut were merged into the Colony of Connecticut: Saybrook Colony in 1644 and New Haven Colony in 1662.

navy , white , red , and gray

The Connecticut Huskies men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball team of the University of Connecticut, in Storrs, Connecticut. They currently play in the American Athletic Conference (The American).

                   

The Connecticut Huskies, also known as the UConn Huskies, are the athletic teams of the University of Connecticut in the United States. The school is a member of National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I and the American Athletic Conference. The major sports at the university are football (played at Rentschler Field) and men's and women's basketball (played on-campus at Harry A. Gampel Pavilion and off-campus at the XL Center), although many of the other sports have large followings and a tradition of success. UConn is one of only 15 universities in the nation that plays Division I FBS football and Division I men's ice hockey.

The Connecticut Huskies football team is a collegiate football team that competes in NCAA Division I FBS and the American Athletic Conference (The American). Connecticut first fielded a team in 1896, and participated in Division I-AA until 1999. The Huskies began their two-year Division I-A transition period in 2000, and became a full-fledged Division I-A team in 2002. The team's football team joined the other sports leagues in the American Athletic Conference (then known as the Big East until the end of the 2012-13 season) starting in 2004.

The University of Connecticut began playing football in 1896 when the school was known as Storrs Agricultural College, and the team was known as the "Aggies." It teamed up with the University of Massachusetts Amherst and University of Rhode Island to form the Athletic League of New England State Colleges for the purpose of scheduling football matchups between the schools. The first year was spent playing against local high schools and YMCA clubs. The following year provided their first competition against future rivals Rhode Island, an opponent that would be played over 100 times, and Massachusetts. Other early rivals included the Ivy League and the "Little Ivies", particularly Yale University starting in 1948, whom have played the Huskies for 50 years.

A can opener (in North American English and Australian English) or tin opener (in British and Commonwealth English) is a device used to open tin cans (metal cans). Although preservation of food using tin cans had been practiced since at least 1772 in the Netherlands, the first can openers were patented only in 1855 in England and in 1858 in the United States. Those openers were basically variations of a knife, and the 1855 design continues to be produced. The first can opener consisting of the now familiar sharp rotating cutting wheel, which travels around the can's ring slicing open the lid, was invented in 1870 but people found it difficult to operate. A breakthrough came in 1925 when a second, serrated wheel was added to hold the cutting wheel on the ring of the can. This easy to use design has become one of the most popular can opener models.

Around the time of World War II, several can openers were developed for military use, such as the American P-38 and P-51. These featured a robust and simple design where a folding cutting blade and absence of a handle significantly reduced the opener size. Electric can openers were introduced in the late 1950s and met with success. The development of new can opener types continues with the recent addition of a side-cutting model.

A can opener (in North American English and Australian English) or tin opener (in British and Commonwealth English) is a device used to open tin cans (metal cans). Although preservation of food using tin cans had been practiced since at least 1772 in the Netherlands, the first can openers were patented only in 1855 in England and in 1858 in the United States. Those openers were basically variations of a knife, and the 1855 design continues to be produced. The first can opener consisting of the now familiar sharp rotating cutting wheel, which travels around the can's ring slicing open the lid, was invented in 1870 but people found it difficult to operate. A breakthrough came in 1925 when a second, serrated wheel was added to hold the cutting wheel on the ring of the can. This easy to use design has become one of the most popular can opener models.

Around the time of World War II, several can openers were developed for military use, such as the American P-38 and P-51. These featured a robust and simple design where a folding cutting blade and absence of a handle significantly reduced the opener size. Electric can openers were introduced in the late 1950s and met with success. The development of new can opener types continues with the recent addition of a side-cutting model.

Diving

A spinal lock is a multiple joint lock applied to the spinal column, which is performed by forcing the spine beyond its normal ranges of motion. This is typically done by bending or twisting the head or upper body into abnormal positions. Commonly, spinal locks might strain the spinal musculature or result in a mild spinal sprain, while a forcefully and/or suddenly applied spinal lock may cause severe ligament damage or damage to the vertebrae, and possibly result in serious spinal cord injury, strokes, or death.

Spinal locks can be separated into two categories based on their primary area of effect on the spinal column: spinal locks on the neck are called neck cranks and locks on the lower parts of the spine are called spine cranks.

The P-38, developed in 1942, is a small can opener that was issued in the canned field rations of the United States Armed Forces from World War II to the 1980s. Originally designed for and distributed in the K-ration, it was later included in the C-ration. As of 2013, it is still in production and sold on a worldwide market.

The P-38 is known as a "John Wayne" by the United States Marine Corps, either because of its toughness and dependability, or because of an unsubstantiated story that the actor had been shown in an as-yet-unidentified training film opening a can of K-Rations. The can opener is pocket-sized, approximately 1.5 inches (38 mm) long, and consists of a short metal blade that serves as a handle, with a small, hinged metal tooth that folds out to pierce the can lid. A notch just under the hinge point keeps the opener hooked around the rim of the can as the device is "walked" around to cut the lid out. A larger version called the P-51 is somewhat easier to operate. The handle portion can also double as a flat-blade screwdriver.

"Assume a can opener" is a catchphrase used to mock professionals, particularly economists, who base their conclusions on unrealistic or unlikely assumptions. It derives from an old joke:

A physicist, a chemist and an economist are stranded on an island, with nothing to eat. A can of soup washes ashore. The physicist says, "Let's smash the can open with a rock." The chemist says, "Let's build a fire and heat the can first." The economist says, "Let's assume that we have a can-opener..."

The third season of the American sitcom The Big Bang Theory was originally aired on CBS from September 21, 2009 to May 24, 2010 with 23 episodes. It has received higher ratings than the previous two seasons with over 15 million viewers. The Complete Third Season DVD erroneously credits Mark Cendrowski for directing nearly the entire season.]citation needed[ Season three starts three months after the end of season two when the guys left for the North Pole.

Penny throws herself at Leonard after he returns from three months at the North Pole and they begin a relationship that lasts most of the season, Penny and Sheldon start a quirky friendship though she can still annoy him, Wil Wheaton begins appearing as Sheldon's arch enemy and breaks up Leonard and Penny, Howard begins to date Bernadette Rostenkowski and at the end of the season Sheldon meets Amy Farrah Fowler.

A tin can, tin (especially in British English, Australian English and Canadian English ), steel can, steel packaging or a can, is a container for the distribution or storage of goods, composed of thin metal. Many cans require opening by cutting the "end" open; others have removable covers. Cans hold diverse contents: foods, beverages, oil, chemicals, etc. Metal cans are not used as shipping containers.

Steel cans are made of tinplate (tin-coated steel) or tin-free steel. In some locations, even aluminium cans are called "tin cans".

William Worcester Lyman (March 29, 1821 – Nov 15, 1891) was an American inventor from Meriden, Connecticut. He is credited with inventing the first rotating wheel can opener.

William Lyman was born in 1821 in Middlefield, Connecticut. At the age of 15 he was apprenticed to the local company Griswold & Couch, located in Meriden, Connecticut, to learn pewtersmithery, and worked there until 1844. After that, he continued working as a pewtersmith with various local companies until 1880. In 1849, he was appointed as State Representative in Meriden. On September 5, 1841 William married Roxanne Griswold Frary, a local woman one year older than he was. He died in Meriden in 1891 at the age of 70.

C-ration

The Field Ration Eating Device (commonly abbreviated to "FRED") is a small device which is a combination of a can opener, a bottle opener and a spoon. It is issued to the Australian Defence Force in its CR1M ration packs. It is also known widely as the "Fucking' Ridiculous Eating Device".

The can opener is very similar in design to the US military P-38 can opener.

Technology Home Packaging Containers Tin

A beverage can is a metal container designed to hold a fixed portion of liquid such as a carbonated soft drinks, alcoholic beverages, fruit juices, teas, tisanes, energy drinks, etc. Beverage cans are made of aluminium (75% of worldwide production) or tin-plated steel (25% worldwide production). Worldwide production for all beverage cans is approximately 475 billion cans per year worldwide, 52 billion per year in Europe.

Beginning in the 1930s, after an established history of success with storing food, metal cans were used to store beverages. The first beer was available in cans beginning in 1935. Not long after that, sodas, with their higher acidity and somewhat higher pressures, were available in cans. The key development for storing beverages in cans was the interior liner, typically plastic or sometimes a waxy substance, that helped to keep the beverage's flavor from being ruined by a chemical reaction with the metal. Another major factor for the timing was the end of Prohibition in the US at the end of 1933.

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