Question:

How old do you have to be to get arthritis?

Answer:

There are many different forms of arthritis, juvenile arthritis for example affects nearly 300,000 children in the US alone.

More Info:

Childhood Arthritis (JA) also known as Juvenile arthritis is any form of arthritis or arthritis related conditions which affects individuals under the age of 16. Juvenile Arthritis is a chronic, autoimmune disease affecting approximately 294,000-250,000 children and teens making juvenile arthritis one of the most common childhood diseases in the US. Three classifications of juvenile arthritis exist-juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of which, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is the most common.

Three main types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis exist and classification is based upon symptoms, number of joints involved and the presence of antibodies in the blood. Polyarticular arthritis is the first type of arthritis which affects about 30-40% of children with arthritis and is more common in girls than boys. Typically five or more joints are affected (usually smaller joints such as the hands and feet but many also affect the hips, neck, shoulders and jaw). Oligoarticular (pauciarticular) arthritis can be early or late onset and is the second type of arthritis affecting about 50% of children with juvenile arthritis. This type affects fewer than four joints (usually the large joints such as knees, ankles or wrists) and may cause eye inflammation in girls with positive anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). Girls younger than eight are more likely to develop this type of arthritis. Systemic is the final classification of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis where 10-20% of children (boys and girls equally) are affected with limited movement, swelling and pain in at least one joint. A common symptom of this type of arthritis is a high, spiking fever of 102-103 degrees or higher, lasting for weeks or months and a rash of pale red spots on the chest, thighs or other parts of the body may also be visible.

arthritis

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (US), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic consisting of 50 states, 16 territories, a federal district, and various overseas extraterritorial jurisdictions. The 48 contiguous states and the federal district of Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific. The country also has five populated and nine unpopulated territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. At 3.79 million square miles (9.83 million km2) in total and with around 316 million people, the United States is the fourth-largest country by total area and third largest by population. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries. The geography and climate of the United States is also extremely diverse, and it is home to a wide variety of wildlife.

Paleo-indians migrated from Asia to what is now the US mainland around 15,000 years ago, with European colonization beginning in the 16th century. The United States emerged from 13 British colonies located along the Atlantic seaboard. Disputes between Great Britain and these colonies led to the American Revolution. On July 4, 1776, delegates from the 13 colonies unanimously issued the Declaration of Independence. The ensuing war ended in 1783 with the recognition of independence of the United States from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and was the first successful war of independence against a European colonial empire. The current Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787. The first 10 amendments, collectively named the Bill of Rights, were ratified in 1791 and guarantee many fundamental civil rights and freedoms.

Rheumatology Arthritis

A connective tissue disease is any disease that has the connective tissues of the body as a target of pathology. Connective tissue is any type of biological tissue with an extensive extracellular matrix that supports, binds together, and protects organs. These tissues form a framework, or matrix, for the body, and are composed of two major structural protein molecules: collagen and elastin. There are many different types of collagen protein in each of the body's tissues. Elastin has the capability of stretching and returning to its original length—like a spring or rubber band. Elastin is the major component of ligaments (tissues that attach bone to bone) and skin. In patients with connective tissue disease, it is common for collagen and elastin to become injured by inflammation. Many connective tissue diseases feature abnormal immune system activity with inflammation in tissues as a result of an immune system that is directed against one's own body tissues (autoimmunity).

Diseases in which inflammation or weakness of collagen tends to occur are also referred to as collagen diseases. Collagen vascular diseases can be (but are not necessarily) associated with collagen and blood vessel abnormalities and that are autoimmune in nature. See also vasculitis.

An aging-associated disease is a disease that is most often seen with increasing frequency with increasing senescence. Essentially, aging-associated diseases are complications arising from senescence. Age-associated diseases are to be distinguished from the aging process itself because all adult animals age, save for a few rare exceptions, but not all adult animals experience all age-associated diseases. Aging-associated diseases do not refer to age-specific diseases, such as the childhood diseases chicken pox and measles. "Aging-associated disease" is used here to mean "diseases of the elderly". Nor should aging-associated diseases be confused with accelerated aging diseases, all of which are genetic disorders.

Examples of aging-associated diseases are cardiovascular disease, cancer, arthritis, cataracts, osteoporosis, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and Alzheimer's disease. The incidence of all of these diseases increases rapidly with aging (increases exponentially with age, in the case of cancer).

Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), also known as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), is the most common form of arthritis in children and adolescents. (Juvenile in this context refers to an onset before age 16, idiopathic refers to a condition with no defined cause, and arthritis is the inflammation of the synovium of a joint.)

JIA is a subset of arthritis seen in childhood, which may be transient and self-limited or chronic. It differs significantly from arthritis commonly seen in adults (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis), and other types of arthritis that can present in childhood which are chronic conditions (e.g. psoriatic arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis). It is an autoimmune disorder. The disease commonly occurs in children from the ages of 7 to 12, but it may occur in adolescents as old as 15 years of age, as well as in infants. JIA affects approximately 1 in 1,000 children in any given year, with about 1 in 10,000 having a more severe form.

Childhood Arthritis (JA) also known as Juvenile arthritis is any form of arthritis or arthritis related conditions which affects individuals under the age of 16. Juvenile Arthritis is a chronic, autoimmune disease affecting approximately 294,000-250,000 children and teens making juvenile arthritis one of the most common childhood diseases in the US. Three classifications of juvenile arthritis exist-juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) of which, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is the most common.

Three main types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis exist and classification is based upon symptoms, number of joints involved and the presence of antibodies in the blood. Polyarticular arthritis is the first type of arthritis which affects about 30-40% of children with arthritis and is more common in girls than boys. Typically five or more joints are affected (usually smaller joints such as the hands and feet but many also affect the hips, neck, shoulders and jaw). Oligoarticular (pauciarticular) arthritis can be early or late onset and is the second type of arthritis affecting about 50% of children with juvenile arthritis. This type affects fewer than four joints (usually the large joints such as knees, ankles or wrists) and may cause eye inflammation in girls with positive anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA). Girls younger than eight are more likely to develop this type of arthritis. Systemic is the final classification of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis where 10-20% of children (boys and girls equally) are affected with limited movement, swelling and pain in at least one joint. A common symptom of this type of arthritis is a high, spiking fever of 102-103 degrees or higher, lasting for weeks or months and a rash of pale red spots on the chest, thighs or other parts of the body may also be visible.

The Arthritis Foundation is the largest national nonprofit organization solely dedicated to the prevention, control and cure of arthritis, the leading cause of disability in the United States.

More than 100 different types of arthritis and related conditions rob 50 million (one in every five) adults and 300,000 children of living life to its fullest. The Arthritis Foundation works to educate people about this serious, progressive and potentially life-threatening disease through information and programs that improve joint health and promote pain management.

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that results in a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder that may affect many tissues and organs, but principally attacks flexible (synovial) joints. It can be a disabling and painful condition, which can lead to substantial loss of functioning and mobility if not adequately treated.

The process involves an inflammatory response of the capsule around the joints (synovium) secondary to swelling (turgescence) of synovial cells, excess synovial fluid, and the development of fibrous tissue (pannus) in the synovium. The pathology of the disease process often leads to the destruction of articular cartilage and ankylosis (fusion) of the joints. RA can also produce diffuse inflammation in the lungs, the membrane around the heart (pericardium), the membranes of the lung (pleura), and white of the eye (sclera), and also nodular lesions, most common in subcutaneous tissue. Although the cause of RA is unknown, autoimmunity plays a big part, and RA is a systemic autoimmune disease. It is a clinical diagnosis made on the basis of symptoms, physical exam, radiographs (X-rays) and labs.

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