Question:

How much weight should I lose if I eat 500 calories a day?

Answer:

How much weight you lose on 500 calories depends on how many calories you burn. Weight loss=less calories in, more calories burned.

More Info:

Obesity Diets Dietetics

Weight loss, in the context of medicine, health, or physical fitness, is a reduction of the total body mass, due to a mean loss of fluid, body fat or adipose tissue and/or lean mass, namely bone mineral deposits, muscle, tendon, and other connective tissue. It can occur unintentionally due to an underlying disease or can arise from a conscious effort to improve an actual or perceived overweight or obese state.

Food energy is energy that animals (including humans) derive from their food, through the process of cellular respiration, the process of joining oxygen with the molecules of food (aerobic respiration) or of reorganizing the atoms within the molecules for anaerobic respiration.

Humans and other animals need a minimum intake of food energy to sustain their metabolism and drive their muscles. Foods are composed chiefly of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, vitamins, and minerals. Carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and water represent virtually all the weight of food, with vitamins and minerals making up only a small percentage of the weight. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins comprise ninety percent of the dry weight of foods. Food energy is derived from carbohydrates, fats and proteins as well as organic acids, polyols, and ethanol present in the diet. Some diet components that provide little or no food energy, such as water, minerals, vitamins and fiber, may still be necessary to health and survival for other reasons. Water contains very stable chemical bonds and so cannot be oxidized to provide energy. Vitamins and minerals are present in very small amounts (in milli- or micrograms) and also cannot be used for energy. Fiber, a type of carbohydrate, cannot be completely digested by the human body. Ruminants can extract food energy from the respiration of cellulose thanks to bacteria in their rumens.

Health Management Resources (HMR) is a provider of weight management programs, products and services to the medical community in the United States. HMR, a private company with headquarters in Boston, MA, USA, was founded in 1983. HMR helps to establish medical and behavioral intervention programs in hospitals, medical schools, and medical practices across the U.S. In addition to these clinic-based programs, HMR also offers programs that dieters can do on their own, with or without additional support. The basis of the treatment program is learning how to make lifestyle changes to lose weight and maintain the weight loss. HMR has published a number of research studies on the program results, including several on participants who have lost 100 pounds or more over a number of years.

According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005, published jointly in the U.S. by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA), lifestyle change in diet and physical activity is the best first choice for weight loss and maintaining a reduced weight. Calories count when it comes to controlling weight. Losing and maintaining weight is based on energy balance – balancing the calories (or energy) from food with the calories expended through physical activity. When you burn calories through physical activity and/or reduce the number of calories you eat, you create a "calorie deficit", resulting in weight loss. In order to maintain a weight loss, you must balance the “calories in” with the “calories out”.


The apparent weight loss effects of water are still a subject for further research, but there is some evidence that suggests that drinking water can be associated with appetite reduction (for middle-aged and older people), consuming fewer calories, burning slightly more calories, and eating more fruits and vegetables. Increased water consumption, or replacement of energy-containing beverages with energy-free beverages, or consumption of water-rich foods such as fruits and vegetables with a lower energy density, may help in weight management. Popular advice to children regarding water consumption is often inaccurate.

This evidence has been used by some of the scientists who worked on this research, and by others, to bolster suggestions that people who are trying to lose weight can benefit from augmenting – but not replacing – their dietary programs by drinking water, either before meals or at any time. Such advice had previously been given by dieticians even before the most recent research was published.

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