Question:

How much is 1000 pesos worth?

Answer:

1,000 Mexico Pesos is currently equal to 78.70 United States Dollars. Thank you for using AnswerParty!

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The peso (originally established as the peso convertible) is the currency of Argentina, identified by the symbol $ preceding the amount in the same way as many countries using dollar currencies. It is subdivided into 100 centavos. Its ISO 4217 code is ARS. Several earlier currencies of Argentina were also called "peso"; as inflation progressed a new currency with a few zeroes dropped and a different qualifier (peso national currency, peso law 18188, peso argentino...) was introduced. Since 1969 thirteen zeroes have been dropped (a factor of ten trillion).


Economy of Argentina

10.8% (2012)

Main data source: CIA World Fact Book


Mexican peso

The peso (sign: $; code: MXN) is the currency of Mexico. Modern peso and dollar currencies have a common origin in the 15th–19th century Spanish dollar, most continuing to use its sign, "$". The Mexican peso is the 13th most traded currency in the world, the third most traded in the Americas, and the most traded currency in Latin America.

The current ISO 4217 code for the peso is MXN; prior to the 1993 revaluation (see below), the code MXP was used. The peso is subdivided into 100 centavos, represented by "¢". As of January 4, 2013, the peso's exchange rate was $16.5914 per euro and $12.7597 per U.S. dollar [1]

Peso Currency
Colombian peso

The peso is the currency of Colombia. Its ISO 4217 code is COP and it is also informally abbreviated as COL$. However, the official peso symbol is $. As of 4 June 2013, the exchange rate of the Colombian peso is 1,900.45 Colombian pesos to 1 U.S. dollar.

The convertible peso (sometimes given as CUC$) (informally called a chavito), is one of two official currencies in Cuba, the other being the peso. It has been in limited use since 1994, when it was treated as equivalent to the U.S. dollar: its value was officially US$1.00. On 8 November 2004, the U.S. dollar ceased to be accepted in Cuban retail outlets leaving the convertible peso as the only currency in circulation in many Cuban businesses. Officially exchangeable only within the country, its value was increased to US$1.08 on 5 April 2008, and reverted to US$1.00 on 15 March 2011. The convertible peso is, by the pegged rate, the twelfth-highest-valued currency unit in the world and the highest valued "peso" unit.

On 22 October 2013, it was announced that the currency is to be scrapped by gradualy unifying it with the lower value Cuban peso.

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