Question:

How much horsepower and torque does a 1992 ford ranger with a V6 3.0 liter have?

Answer:

It has 145 Hp, and 165 ft. lbs of torque. CHacha

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A pickup truck, often simply referred to as a pickup or pick-up, is a light motor vehicle with an open-top, rear cargo area (bed).

In North America, the term pickup is used for light trucks with a lighter duty chassis and factory built, integrated bed, as well as for coupé utility vehicles, often based on a personal car chassis, but also often on a special dedicated chassis for such use.

The Ford Ranger is a nameplate that has been used on two distinct model lines of pickup trucks sold by the Ford Motor Company, a version sold in North America and later parts of South America, as well as a separate model sold internationally.

Ford designed and engineered the North American version of the Ranger, which commenced manufacture in January 1982 for the 1983 model year and ended production in December 2011. For the 1995 model year, Ford exported the North American model to select Latin and South American countries; however, as demand increased, Ford began producing the model at its Argentinian plant. During the 1994 through 2010 model years, Mazda badge engineered this model as the North American "B-Series" replacing the "international" version of the Mazda B-Series that had previously been retailed in North America. During its 29-year production run, the Ranger received several updates: notably, the 1989 model year facelift, the introduction of the second-generation model for 1993, a 1998 model year facelift of the same, and several smaller second-generation cosmetic changes in the 2001, 2004, and 2006 model years. The Latin and South American version was re-skinned in 2009 for the 2010 model year, receiving all-new exterior sheet metal while retaining the existing body structure.

Horsepower Torque

A V6 engine is a V engine with six cylinders mounted on the crankcase in two banks of three cylinders, usually set at either a right angle or an acute angle to each other, with all six pistons driving a common crankshaft. It is the second most common engine configuration in modern cars after the inline four.

The V6 is one of the most compact engine configurations, shorter than the inline-4 and in many designs narrower than the V8. Owing to its compact length, the V6 lends itself well to the widely used transverse engine front-wheel drive layout. It is becoming more common as the space allowed for engines in modern cars is reduced at the same time as power requirements increase, and has largely replaced the straight-six engine, which is too long to fit in many modern engine compartments. The V6 engine has become widely adopted for medium-sized cars, often as an optional engine where an inline-4 is standard, or as a base engine where a V8 is a higher-cost performance option.

The Toyota T100 (not to be confused with RK100) was a full-size pickup truck introduced by Toyota in late 1992 as a 1993 model year vehicle.

As Toyota firmly established itself in the North American compact pickup truck market in the 1980s through 1990s, it seemed only logical that Toyota needed to capture part of the lucrative full-size pickup truck market. Rumored for many years before, the 1993 Toyota T100 boasted a full-size (8 ft) pickup bed but retained the engine and suspension setup of its smaller and older sibling, the compact Toyota Pickup Truck. Although the T100 was a bit larger than the competitive mid-size Dodge Dakota and compact Ford Ranger pickup trucks of the time, it was still much smaller than full-size American pickup trucks of the time. This gave the T100 a unique position and opportunity within the truck ranks. Though economical, reliable and practical, in the grand scheme of things the unsuccessful T100 had not captured as much of the market as Toyota had hoped. Many critics maintained]citation needed[ the T100 was still too small, despite being larger than both the Toyota Pickup Truck and the Toyota Tacoma compact trucks, for the full-size segment.

Special Vehicle Team, also known as SVT, is an arm of Ford Motor Company responsible for the development of the company's highest-performance vehicles, much like Mercedes-AMG, BMW M, Audi Sport & Performance Division, Chrysler's SRT division, and GM's Performance Division. SVT is the successor to the SVO division. The current SVT Director is Hermann Salenbauch. SVT was previously led by Hau Thai-Tang (2004–2007) and John Coletti (199X-2004).

The group mainly produces specially tuned versions of Ford production vehicles such as the 2010 F-150 SVT Raptor which is based on the F-150 pickup, and the Shelby GT500, which was based on the Mustang. However, they do occasionally develop models independently of the rest of the company, namely the GT supercar (developed in conjunction with Saleen). SVT was founded in 1983 by John Plant of Ford Marketing, Janine Bay of Ford Mustang Program Management, and Robert Burnham of Ford Truck Program Management. Originally known as Special Vehicle Operations, SVO developed the 1984–1986 2.3-liter turbo-charged 4-cylinder Mustang SVO, as well as marketed performance parts through dealer networks (now known as Ford Racing Performance Parts, or FRPP).

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