Question:

How many years can you live with Hep C?

Answer:

The life expectancy of chronic hepatitis C patients is unclear at this point because 20% may develop cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), with 25% of these people progressing to liver cancer or failure.

More Info:


liver cancer

Liver cancer or hepatic cancer (from the Greek hēpar, meaning liver) is a cancer that originates in the liver. Primary liver cancer is the fifth most frequently diagnosed cancer globally and the second leading cause of cancer death. Liver cancers are malignant tumors that grow on the surface or inside the liver. They are formed from either the liver itself or from structures within the liver, including blood vessels or the bile duct. Liver tumors are discovered on medical imaging equipment (often by accident) or present themselves symptomatically as an abdominal mass, abdominal pain, jaundice, nausea or liver dysfunction. The leading cause of liver cancer is viral infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus. The cancer usually forms secondary to cirrhosis caused by these viruses. For this reason, the highest rates of liver cancer occur where these viruses are endemic, including East-Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Liver cancers should not be confused with liver metastases, also known as secondary liver cancer, which are cancers that originate from organs elsewhere in the body and migrate to the liver.

cirrhosis chronic hepatitis C Cirrhosis Hepatitis
Hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, also called malignant hepatoma) is the most common type of liver cancer. Most cases of HCC are secondary to either a viral hepatitis infection (hepatitis B or C) or cirrhosis (alcoholism being the most common cause of hepatic cirrhosis).

Compared to other cancers, HCC is quite a rare tumour in the United States. In countries where hepatitis is not endemic, most malignant cancers in the liver are not primary HCC but metastasis (spread) of cancer from elsewhere in the body, e.g., the colon. Treatment options of HCC and prognosis are dependent on many factors but especially on tumour size and staging. Tumour grade is also important. High-grade tumours will have a poor prognosis, while low-grade tumors may go unnoticed for many years, as is the case in many other organs.


Liver cancer

Liver cancer or hepatic cancer (from the Greek hēpar, meaning liver) is a cancer that originates in the liver. Primary liver cancer is the fifth most frequently diagnosed cancer globally and the second leading cause of cancer death. Liver cancers are malignant tumors that grow on the surface or inside the liver. They are formed from either the liver itself or from structures within the liver, including blood vessels or the bile duct. Liver tumors are discovered on medical imaging equipment (often by accident) or present themselves symptomatically as an abdominal mass, abdominal pain, jaundice, nausea or liver dysfunction. The leading cause of liver cancer is viral infection with hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus. The cancer usually forms secondary to cirrhosis caused by these viruses. For this reason, the highest rates of liver cancer occur where these viruses are endemic, including East-Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Liver cancers should not be confused with liver metastases, also known as secondary liver cancer, which are cancers that originate from organs elsewhere in the body and migrate to the liver.

Liver
Jade Ribbon Campaign

The Jade Ribbon Campaign (JRC) was launched by the Asian Liver Center (ALC) at Stanford University in May 2001 during Asian Pacific American Heritage Month to help spread awareness internationally about hepatitis B (HBV) and liver cancer in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities.

The objective of the Jade Ribbon Campaign is twofold: (1) to eradicate HBV worldwide; and (2) to reduce the incidence and mortality associated with liver cancer.

Autoimmune Hepatitis is a disease of the liver that occurs when the body's immune system attacks cells of the liver. Anomalous presentation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II on the surface of hepatocytes,]citation needed[ possibly due to genetic predisposition or acute liver infection, causes a cell-mediated immune response against the body's own liver, resulting in autoimmune hepatitis. This abnormal immune response results in inflammation of the liver, which can lead to further symptoms and complications such as fatigue and cirrhosis.

Four subtypes are recognised, but the clinical utility of distinguishing subtypes is limited.

Medicine Hepatology Health Health Medical Pharma Health Medical Pharma
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
38