Question:

How many seasons are there in the 'Trailer Park Boys' series?

Answer:

There are 7 seasons of the show The Trailer Park Boys. AnswerParty!

More Info:

Trailer Park Boys is a Canadian comedy mockumentary television series created and directed by Mike Clattenburg that focuses on the misadventures of a group of trailer park residents, some of whom are ex-convicts, living in the fictional Sunnyvale Trailer Park in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. The television series is a continuation of Clattenburg's 1999 film of the same name and premiered on the Showcase television network in 2001. The planned final season ended in 2007, and the planned final episode, "Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys," premiered as a special on Showcase on December 7, 2008, ending the initial run of the series. A second film—Countdown to Liquor Day—was released in Canada on September 25, 2009. A third film has completed production and will be released in Canada in April, 2014. With the films, stage shows and continued international interest in the original series, an eighth season started production July 2013.

Television in Canada officially began with the opening of the nation's first television stations in Montreal and Toronto in 1952. As with most media in Canada, the television industry, and the television programming available in that country, are strongly influenced by the US media, perhaps to an extent not seen in any other major industrialized nation outside the U.S. itself. As a result, the government institutes quotas for "Canadian content". Nonetheless, new content is often aimed at a broader North American audience, although the similarities may be less pronounced in the predominantly French-language province of Quebec.

The cinema of Canada or Canadian cinema refers to the filmmaking industry in Canada. Canada is home to several film studios centres, primarily located in its three largest metropolitan centres: Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. Industries and communities tend to be regional and niche in nature. Approximately 1,000 Anglophone-Canadian and 600 Francophone-Canadian feature-length films have been produced, or partially produced, by the Canadian film industry since 1911.

Notable filmmakers from English Canada include David Cronenberg, Guy Maddin, Atom Egoyan, Allan King, and Michael Snow. Notable filmmakers from French Canada include Claude Jutra, Gilles Carle, Denys Arcand, Jean Beaudin, Robert Lepage, Denis Villeneuve and Michel Brault.

Television

The cinema of Canada or Canadian cinema refers to the filmmaking industry in Canada. Canada is home to several film studios centres, primarily located in its three largest metropolitan centres: Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver. Industries and communities tend to be regional and niche in nature. Approximately 1,000 Anglophone-Canadian and 600 Francophone-Canadian feature-length films have been produced, or partially produced, by the Canadian film industry since 1911.

Notable filmmakers from English Canada include David Cronenberg, Guy Maddin, Atom Egoyan, Allan King, and Michael Snow. Notable filmmakers from French Canada include Claude Jutra, Gilles Carle, Denys Arcand, Jean Beaudin, Robert Lepage, Denis Villeneuve and Michel Brault.

A trailer park is a semi-permanent or permanent area for mobile homes or travel trailers. The main reasons for living in such trailer parks are the often lower cost compared to other housing, and the ability to move to a new area more quickly and easily, for example when changing jobs to another part of the country taking the mobile home/trailer with them.

Trailer parks, especially in American culture, are stereotypically viewed as lower income housing whose occupants live at or below the poverty line, have low social status and lead a desultory and deleterious lifestyle. Despite the advances in trailer home technology, the trailer park image survives, as evoked by a statement from Presidential adviser James Carville who, in the course of one of the Bill Clinton White House political scandals, suggested "Drag $100 bills through trailer parks, there's no telling what you'll find"," in reference to Paula Jones. It is also seen in the Canadian mockumentary Trailer Park Boys.

Trailer

John Paul Tremblay (born January 1, 1968) is a Canadian actor who stars in the hit Canadian TV show Trailer Park Boys, playing Julian, a newly released ex-con returning to his home in a trailer park in Nova Scotia. Tremblay grew up in the Dartmouth suburb of Cole Harbour where he lived on the same street and went to the same high school as Robb Wells, his future co-star of Trailer Park Boys. The show is written by Tremblay along with co-stars Robb Wells and Mike Smith. The Trailer Park Boys released a film in 2006, most of it being filmed in the municipality of Halifax. Tremblay and Wells also appeared in the 2002 family film Virginia's Run, though not as Ricky and Julian. John is married to Andrea Tremblay (Hurley) they have 3 children.

In 2010, Tremblay reunited with many of his former Trailer Park Boys castmates in the new series The Drunk and On Drugs Happy Fun Time Hour. In 2011, Tremblay again reunited with Trailer Park Boys castmates Robb Wells and Mike Smith for the live comedy show Drunk, High and Unemployed, which toured across the United States, and appeared in the Archer episode, "The Limited.".

The following is a list of characters featured in the Canadian television series Trailer Park Boys.

Richard "Ricky" (Robb Wells) is a fun-loving, dim-witted lowlife who enjoys marijuana, pepperoni, chips, licorice, cigarettes, chicken fingers and alcohol, and is the series' protagonist. He and Julian have been best friends since childhood and are almost codependent, with Ricky relying on his friend to guide him and keep his antics in check. While good natured towards his friends and family, Ricky is also foul-mouthed, volatile, and aggressive, and almost always manages to anger, offend and alienate those around him. He has always been a trouble maker and often refuses to take responsibility for his actions, illegal or otherwise. He seems to believe that any form of evidence of wrongdoing can be dispensed with by simply flinging it into the air from where he is standing or by submerging it in a nearby lake. As a result, the grounds of the trailer park and the lake are littered with evidence of crimes. Fortunately, he is very adept at talking his way out of trouble with the police. A lifetime of drinking, smoking dope, and slacking off has left Ricky with a below average intelligence, for which he is often ridiculed. Even Ricky considers himself stupid, having repeatedly failed grades and having dropped out of school entirely after grade 10. On the other hand, he is also fairly clever and has many practical areas of expertise, such as growing marijuana, fixing cars, cooking, and siphoning gas. He also has a "superpower" which gives him the ability to confuse and disperse cops who catch him committing a crime. Although characters such as Lahey or the police deride Ricky as nothing but a loser and a criminal, he is very devoted to his family, especially his daughter Trinity. Even though Ricky often tries to take the easy way out by breaking the law instead of getting a real job, he occasionally demonstrates some dedication to work and education in an effort to prove himself more than a simple lowlife. Ricky is known for his trademark eggcorns ("Denial and Error"; "Catch-23 situation"; "Get two birds stoned at once"; "Worst case Ontario"; "It's clear to see who makes the pants here"), dubbed "Rickyisms" by fans. He often wears black track pants and patterned shirts and enjoys listening to Canadian '80s rock bands such as Helix, April Wine and Kim Mitchell. For most of the series, Ricky lives in and drives the "Shitmobile", a dilapidated 1975 Chrysler New Yorker. He bears a resemblance to the hypnotist Peter Reveen, much to his apparent chagrin.

News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
11