Question:

How many questions are on the GED test?

Answer:

The GED test consists of 250 multiple choice questions and 1 essay question. There are 5 tests total that must be passed. AnswerParty

More Info:

Education Evaluation

Any test in which the same test is given in the same manner to all test takers is a standardized test. Standardized tests need not be high-stakes tests, time-limited tests, or multiple-choice tests. The opposite of a standardized test is a non-standardized test. Non-standardized testing gives significantly different tests to different test takers, or gives the same test under significantly different conditions (e.g., one group is permitted far less time to complete the test than the next group), or evaluates them differently (e.g., the same answer is counted right for one student, but wrong for another student).

Standardized tests are perceived as being more fair than non-standardized tests. The consistency also permits more reliable comparison of outcomes across all test takers.


Education in Canada is for the most part provided publicly, funded and overseen by federal, provincial, and local governments.]citation needed[ Education is within provincial jurisdiction and the curriculum is overseen by the province. Education in Canada is generally divided into primary education, followed by secondary education and post-secondary. Within the provinces under the ministry of education, there are district school boards administering the educational programs. Education is compulsory up to the age of 16 in every province in Canada, except for Manitoba, Ontario and New Brunswick, where the compulsory age is 18, or as soon as a high school diploma has been achieved. In some provinces early leaving exemptions can be granted under certain circumstances at 14. Canada generally has 190 (180 in Quebec) school days in the year, officially starting from September (after Labour Day) to the end of June (usually the last Friday of the month, except in Quebec when it is just before June 24 – the provincial holiday).

Education in the United States is provided by both public and private schools.

Public education is universally available, with control and funding coming from the state, local, and federal government. Public school curricula, funding, teaching, employment, and other policies are set through locally elected school boards, who have jurisdiction over individual school districts. State governments set educational standards and mandate standardized tests for public school systems.]clarification needed[

General Educational Development (GED) tests are a group of five subject tests which, when passed, certify that the taker has American or Canadian high school-level academic skills.

Although the "GED" initialism is frequently mistaken as meaning "general education degree" or "general education diploma", the American Council on Education, which owns the GED trademark, coined the initialism to identify "tests of general educational development" that measure proficiency in science, mathematics, social studies, reading, and writing. Passing the GED test gives those who did not complete high school the opportunity to earn their high school equivalency credential, but no state awards a "GED" per se.

Multiple choice is a form of assessment in which respondents are asked to select the best possible answer (or answers) out of the choices from a list. The multiple choice format is most frequently used in educational testing, in market research, and in elections, when a person chooses between multiple candidates, parties, or policies. Multiple choice testing is particularly popular in the United States.

Although E. L. Thorndike developed an early multiple choice test, Frederick J. Kelly was the first to use such items as part of a large scale assessment. While Director of the Training School at Kansas State Normal School (now Emporia State University) in 1915, he developed and administered the Kansas Silent Reading Test. Soon after, Kelly became the third Dean of the College of Education at the University of Kansas. The first all multiple choice, large scale assessment was the Army Alpha, used to assess the intelligence of World War I military recruits.

Test

The California High School Proficiency Exam (CHSPE) is an early-exit exam for high school students in California. Students who pass the CHSPE receive a Certificate of Proficiency from the State of California. All persons and institutions subject to California law that require a high school diploma for any purpose must accept the certificate as satisfying the requirement.

Students who are in the second semester of their sophomore year (and aged 15 or over) in high school, or 16–18 years old, or those that have enrolled in the 10th grade for two semesters or more. This exam only pertains to the high school curriculum in California, and may or may not apply to other states. Therefore, a student must check to see if their college of choice outside of California will accept such a test. It is offered twice every six months, and its cost is $110 if on or before the 'Regular Registration' deadline, $135 if on or before the 'Late Registration' deadline, or $160 if on or before the 'Emergency Registration' deadline.

SAT
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
9