Question:

How many players in the MLB have over 100 RBIs in the 2010 season?

Answer:

There is currently only one playing in the MLB that has over 100 RBI's this 2010 season. That would be Miguel Cabrera with 106 RBI's. Jose Bautista is close with 99.

More Info:

MLB

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a North American professional baseball league consisting of teams that play in the American League and National League. The two leagues, dating to 1901 and 1876 respectively as separate legal entities, merged in 2000 into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball.

MLB constitutes one of the four major professional sports leagues of North America. It is composed of thirty teams: twenty-nine in the United States and one in Canada. Teams in MLB play 162 games each season over six months (April through September). Five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven-games championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903.

Major League Baseball on Fox or MLB on Fox is the Fox Broadcasting Company's presentation of Major League Baseball games, produced by Fox Sports. Major League Baseball on Fox began on June 1, 1996 and will continue at least through 2021 with national broadcasts on Fox and Fox Sports 1.

Major League Baseball made a deal with Fox and NBC on November 7, 1995. Fox paid a fraction less of the amount of money that CBS had paid for the Major League Baseball television rights for the 1990–1993 seasons. Unlike the previous television deal, "The Baseball Network", Fox reverted to the format of televising regular season games (approximately 16 weekly telecasts that normally began on Memorial Day weekend) on Saturday afternoons. Fox did however, continue a format that The Baseball Network started by offering games based purely on a viewer's region. Fox's approach has usually been to offer three regionalized telecasts.

Baseball

Major League Baseball on NBC is the de facto name for a weekly presentation of Major League Baseball games televised on the NBC television network from 1947 to 1989, and from 1994 to 2000. There have been several variations of the program dating back to the 1940s, including The NBC Game of the Week and Baseball Night in America.

ESPN Major League Baseball is a promotion of Major League Baseball on ESPN and ESPN2, with simulcasts on ESPNHD or ESPN2HD. ESPN's MLB coverage debuted on April 9, 1990 with three Opening Day telecasts. ESPN Major League Baseball is guaranteed to remain on air until 2021. Starting in 2014, ESPN will return to broadcasting postseason baseball. ESPN has rights to any potential tiebreaker games (Game 163) and one of the two wild card games (Turner Sports receiving the other game).

The title is derived from the fact that it may come on a night when ESPN doesn't have a scheduled game (i.e., Tuesday, Friday, or Saturday). The different weekly regular season games that ESPN presents (as of 2007): Sunday Night Baseball presented by Taco Bell, Monday Night Baseball presented by USAA and Wednesday Night Baseball presented by Goodyear, and formerly ESPN DayGame presented by Fruit of the Loom and Thursday Night Baseball powered by Castrol.

The 2007 Major League Baseball season began on April 1 with a rematch of the 2006 National League Championship Series; the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets played the first game of the season at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, which was won by the Mets, 6–1. The regular season concluded with seven teams entering the postseason who had failed to reach the 2006 playoffs including all National League teams, with only the New York Yankees returning; a dramatic one-game playoff between the Colorado Rockies and San Diego Padres; and the largest September collapse for a leading team in baseball history, with the Mets squandering a 7-game lead with 17 to play, losing on the final day of the regular season, and the Philadelphia Phillies capturing the National League East for the first time since 1993. The season ended on October 28, with the Boston Red Sox sweeping the 2007 World Series over the Rockies, four games to none.

A special exhibition game known as the "Civil Rights Game" was played on March 31 in AutoZone Park in Memphis, Tennessee between the Cardinals and the Cleveland Indians to celebrate the history of civil rights in the United States. The 2007 season commemorates the 60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's entry into the game, breaking the color barrier.

In Major League Baseball, the Rookie of the Year Award is annually given to one player from each league as voted on by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA). The award was established in 1940 by the Chicago chapter of the BBWAA, which selected an annual winner from 1940 through 1946. The award became national in 1947; Jackie Robinson, the Brooklyn Dodgers' second baseman, won the inaugural award. One award was presented for both leagues in 1947 and 1948; since 1949, the honor has been given to one player each in the National and American League. Originally, the award was known as the J. Louis Comiskey Memorial Award, named after the Chicago White Sox owner of the 1930s. The award was renamed the Jackie Robinson Award in July 1987, 40 years after Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color line.

Of the 128 players named Rookie of the Year, 14 have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame—Jackie Robinson, five American League players, and eight others from the National League. The award has been shared twice: once by Butch Metzger and Pat Zachry of the National League in 1976; and once by John Castino and Alfredo Griffin of the American League in 1979. Members of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers have won the most awards of any franchise (with 16), twice the total of the New York Yankees (eight), who have produced the most in the American League. Fred Lynn and Ichiro Suzuki are the only two players who have been named Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player in the same year, and Fernando Valenzuela is the only player to have won Rookie of the Year and the Cy Young Award in the same year. Sam Jethroe is the oldest player to have won the award, at age 32, 33 days older than 2000 winner Kazuhiro Sasaki (also 32). Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals are the most recent winners.

MLB.com

Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio is the brand name for exclusive play-by-play broadcast presentation of Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio. The coverage has most recently been presented by AutoZone; previous presenting sponsors included Xerox, Excedrin, and the United States Postal Service.

In 1998, ESPN Radio took over from CBS Radio as the official, national radio broadcaster for Major League Baseball. The network's contract with MLB currently runs through 2021, and as of 2006, Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio is heard on over 321 stations across the United States.

Major League Baseball on ABC is the de facto title of a program that televises Major League Baseball games on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). The program has appeared in various forms c. 1953-1965 (ABC Game of the Week), 1976–1989 (Monday Night Baseball, Thursday Night Baseball, and Sunday Afternoon Baseball), and 1994–1995 (Baseball Night in America). ABC has not televised Major League Baseball since Game 5 of the 1995 World Series (October 26).

In 1953, ABC-TV executive Edgar J. Scherick (who would later go on to create Wide World of Sports) broached a Saturday Game of the Week.-TV sport's first network series. At the time, ABC was labeled a "nothing network" that had fewer outlets than CBS or NBC. ABC also needed paid programming or "anything for bills" as Scherick put it. At first, ABC hesitated at the idea of a nationally televised regular season baseball program. ABC wondered how exactly the Game of the Week would reach television in the first place and who would notice if it did?

RBIs

Run batted in (plural, runs batted in; and, abbreviated as RBI) is a statistic used in baseball and softball to credit a batter when the outcome of his or her at bat results in a run being scored, except in certain situations such as when an error is made on the play. The first team to track RBIs was the Buffalo Bisons. However, Major League Baseball did not recognize the RBI as an official statistic until 1920.

Common nicknames for an RBI include "Ribby" and "Rib." The plural of RBI is "RBIs" (just as the plural of the acronym for prisoner of war – POW – is POWs) This is because acronyms become bona fide words as language evolves, and as with other words attract a plural suffix at the end to be made plural, even if the first word is the main noun in the spelled-out form.

Text on viewable page says "A pitcher will push off the rubber with his front foot", but the pitcher pushes off the rubber with his BACK foot.


In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run, increasingly rare in modern baseball, where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself. Likewise, the pitcher is recorded as having given up a hit, a run for each runner that scores including the batter.

Home runs are among the most popular aspects of baseball and, as a result, prolific home run hitters are usually the most popular among fans and consequently the highest paid by teams — hence the old saying, variously attributed to slugger Ralph Kiner, or to a teammate talking about Kiner, "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs, and singles hitters drive Fords."

Alexander Emmanuel "Alex" Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod," is an American baseball third baseman for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and the Texas Rangers. Rodriguez was one of the most prodigious young players scouts had ever seen and is now considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. However, Rodriguez has led a highly controversial career due to his expensive contracts and his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

He is the youngest player ever to hit 500 home runs, breaking the record Jimmie Foxx set in 1939, and the youngest to hit 600, besting Babe Ruth's record by over a year. Rodriguez has 14 100-RBI seasons in his career, more than any other player in history. On September 24, 2010, Rodriguez hit two home runs, surpassing Sammy Sosa's mark of 609 home runs, and became the all-time leader in home runs by a player of Hispanic descent.

MLB Records

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), nicknamed "the Bambino" and "the Sultan of Swat", was an American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher and outfielder who played for 22 seasons on three teams, from 1914 through 1935. He was known for his hitting brilliance setting career records in his time for home runs (714, since broken), slugging percentage (.690), runs batted in (RBI) (2,213, since broken), bases on balls (2,062, since broken), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164). Ruth originally entered the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox as a starting pitcher, but after he was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919, he converted to a full-time right fielder. He subsequently became one of the American League's most prolific hitters and with his home run hitting prowess, he helped the Yankees win seven pennants and four World Series titles. Ruth retired in 1935 after a short stint with the Boston Braves, and the following year, he became one of the first five players to be elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

MLB Records

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). In a career spanning 1986 to 2007, Bonds played his first seven seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates before spending 15 years with the San Francisco Giants. He is the son of former major league All-Star Bobby Bonds.

RBI is an acronym for "run batted in", a term used in baseball.

RBI may also refer to:

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American professional baseball player who spent the majority of his Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a center fielder with the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

Mays won two MVP awards and shares the All-Star record of most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron & Stan Musial. Ted Williams said, "They invented the All-Star Game for Willie Mays." Mays ended his career with 660 home runs, third at the time of his retirement, and currently fourth all-time. He was a center fielder and won a record-tying 12 Gold Gloves starting the year the award was introduced six seasons into his career.

Baseball

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 1,892 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 1,892 Phillies, 187 have had surnames beginning with the letter S. Three of those players are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: shortstop Ryne Sandberg, who played one season for the Phillies before being traded to the Chicago Cubs and converting to second base; right fielder Casey Stengel, who played for the Phillies during the 1920 and 1921 seasons and was inducted as a manager; and third baseman Mike Schmidt, who in 1983 was named the greatest Phillie of all time during the election of Philadelphia's Centennial Team. Schmidt is this list's only Hall of Famer to have the Phillies listed as his primary team, and is one of five members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; the others are second baseman Juan Samuel, pitcher Bobby Shantz (inducted as a Philadelphia Athletic), pitcher Chris Short, and pitcher Curt Simmons. Schmidt holds numerous franchise records, including most hits (2,234) and most total bases (4,404), and is the only Phillie on this list to have his number retired.

MLB

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a North American professional baseball league consisting of teams that play in the American League and National League. The two leagues, dating to 1901 and 1876 respectively as separate legal entities, merged in 2000 into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball.

MLB constitutes one of the four major professional sports leagues of North America. It is composed of thirty teams: twenty-nine in the United States and one in Canada. Teams in MLB play 162 games each season over six months (April through September). Five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven-games championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903.

Major League Baseball on Fox or MLB on Fox is the Fox Broadcasting Company's presentation of Major League Baseball games, produced by Fox Sports. Major League Baseball on Fox began on June 1, 1996 and will continue at least through 2021 with national broadcasts on Fox and Fox Sports 1.

Major League Baseball made a deal with Fox and NBC on November 7, 1995. Fox paid a fraction less of the amount of money that CBS had paid for the Major League Baseball television rights for the 1990–1993 seasons. Unlike the previous television deal, "The Baseball Network", Fox reverted to the format of televising regular season games (approximately 16 weekly telecasts that normally began on Memorial Day weekend) on Saturday afternoons. Fox did however, continue a format that The Baseball Network started by offering games based purely on a viewer's region. Fox's approach has usually been to offer three regionalized telecasts.

Baseball

Major League Baseball on NBC is the de facto name for a weekly presentation of Major League Baseball games televised on the NBC television network from 1947 to 1989, and from 1994 to 2000. There have been several variations of the program dating back to the 1940s, including The NBC Game of the Week and Baseball Night in America.

ESPN Major League Baseball is a promotion of Major League Baseball on ESPN and ESPN2, with simulcasts on ESPNHD or ESPN2HD. ESPN's MLB coverage debuted on April 9, 1990 with three Opening Day telecasts. ESPN Major League Baseball is guaranteed to remain on air until 2021. Starting in 2014, ESPN will return to broadcasting postseason baseball. ESPN has rights to any potential tiebreaker games (Game 163) and one of the two wild card games (Turner Sports receiving the other game).

The title is derived from the fact that it may come on a night when ESPN doesn't have a scheduled game (i.e., Tuesday, Friday, or Saturday). The different weekly regular season games that ESPN presents (as of 2007): Sunday Night Baseball presented by Taco Bell, Monday Night Baseball presented by USAA and Wednesday Night Baseball presented by Goodyear, and formerly ESPN DayGame presented by Fruit of the Loom and Thursday Night Baseball powered by Castrol.

The 2007 Major League Baseball season began on April 1 with a rematch of the 2006 National League Championship Series; the St. Louis Cardinals and New York Mets played the first game of the season at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, which was won by the Mets, 6–1. The regular season concluded with seven teams entering the postseason who had failed to reach the 2006 playoffs including all National League teams, with only the New York Yankees returning; a dramatic one-game playoff between the Colorado Rockies and San Diego Padres; and the largest September collapse for a leading team in baseball history, with the Mets squandering a 7-game lead with 17 to play, losing on the final day of the regular season, and the Philadelphia Phillies capturing the National League East for the first time since 1993. The season ended on October 28, with the Boston Red Sox sweeping the 2007 World Series over the Rockies, four games to none.

A special exhibition game known as the "Civil Rights Game" was played on March 31 in AutoZone Park in Memphis, Tennessee between the Cardinals and the Cleveland Indians to celebrate the history of civil rights in the United States. The 2007 season commemorates the 60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson's entry into the game, breaking the color barrier.

In Major League Baseball, the Rookie of the Year Award is annually given to one player from each league as voted on by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA). The award was established in 1940 by the Chicago chapter of the BBWAA, which selected an annual winner from 1940 through 1946. The award became national in 1947; Jackie Robinson, the Brooklyn Dodgers' second baseman, won the inaugural award. One award was presented for both leagues in 1947 and 1948; since 1949, the honor has been given to one player each in the National and American League. Originally, the award was known as the J. Louis Comiskey Memorial Award, named after the Chicago White Sox owner of the 1930s. The award was renamed the Jackie Robinson Award in July 1987, 40 years after Jackie Robinson broke the baseball color line.

Of the 128 players named Rookie of the Year, 14 have been elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame—Jackie Robinson, five American League players, and eight others from the National League. The award has been shared twice: once by Butch Metzger and Pat Zachry of the National League in 1976; and once by John Castino and Alfredo Griffin of the American League in 1979. Members of the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers have won the most awards of any franchise (with 16), twice the total of the New York Yankees (eight), who have produced the most in the American League. Fred Lynn and Ichiro Suzuki are the only two players who have been named Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player in the same year, and Fernando Valenzuela is the only player to have won Rookie of the Year and the Cy Young Award in the same year. Sam Jethroe is the oldest player to have won the award, at age 32, 33 days older than 2000 winner Kazuhiro Sasaki (also 32). Mike Trout of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and Bryce Harper of the Washington Nationals are the most recent winners.

MLB.com

Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio is the brand name for exclusive play-by-play broadcast presentation of Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio. The coverage has most recently been presented by AutoZone; previous presenting sponsors included Xerox, Excedrin, and the United States Postal Service.

In 1998, ESPN Radio took over from CBS Radio as the official, national radio broadcaster for Major League Baseball. The network's contract with MLB currently runs through 2021, and as of 2006, Major League Baseball on ESPN Radio is heard on over 321 stations across the United States.

Major League Baseball on ABC is the de facto title of a program that televises Major League Baseball games on the American Broadcasting Company (ABC). The program has appeared in various forms c. 1953-1965 (ABC Game of the Week), 1976–1989 (Monday Night Baseball, Thursday Night Baseball, and Sunday Afternoon Baseball), and 1994–1995 (Baseball Night in America). ABC has not televised Major League Baseball since Game 5 of the 1995 World Series (October 26).

In 1953, ABC-TV executive Edgar J. Scherick (who would later go on to create Wide World of Sports) broached a Saturday Game of the Week.-TV sport's first network series. At the time, ABC was labeled a "nothing network" that had fewer outlets than CBS or NBC. ABC also needed paid programming or "anything for bills" as Scherick put it. At first, ABC hesitated at the idea of a nationally televised regular season baseball program. ABC wondered how exactly the Game of the Week would reach television in the first place and who would notice if it did?

RBI

Run batted in (plural, runs batted in; and, abbreviated as RBI) is a statistic used in baseball and softball to credit a batter when the outcome of his or her at bat results in a run being scored, except in certain situations such as when an error is made on the play. The first team to track RBIs was the Buffalo Bisons. However, Major League Baseball did not recognize the RBI as an official statistic until 1920.

Common nicknames for an RBI include "Ribby" and "Rib." The plural of RBI is "RBIs" (just as the plural of the acronym for prisoner of war – POW – is POWs) This is because acronyms become bona fide words as language evolves, and as with other words attract a plural suffix at the end to be made plural, even if the first word is the main noun in the spelled-out form.

Text on viewable page says "A pitcher will push off the rubber with his front foot", but the pitcher pushes off the rubber with his BACK foot.


In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run, increasingly rare in modern baseball, where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself. Likewise, the pitcher is recorded as having given up a hit, a run for each runner that scores including the batter.

Home runs are among the most popular aspects of baseball and, as a result, prolific home run hitters are usually the most popular among fans and consequently the highest paid by teams — hence the old saying, variously attributed to slugger Ralph Kiner, or to a teammate talking about Kiner, "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs, and singles hitters drive Fords."

Alexander Emmanuel "Alex" Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod," is an American baseball third baseman for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and the Texas Rangers. Rodriguez was one of the most prodigious young players scouts had ever seen and is now considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. However, Rodriguez has led a highly controversial career due to his expensive contracts and his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

He is the youngest player ever to hit 500 home runs, breaking the record Jimmie Foxx set in 1939, and the youngest to hit 600, besting Babe Ruth's record by over a year. Rodriguez has 14 100-RBI seasons in his career, more than any other player in history. On September 24, 2010, Rodriguez hit two home runs, surpassing Sammy Sosa's mark of 609 home runs, and became the all-time leader in home runs by a player of Hispanic descent.

MLB Records

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), nicknamed "the Bambino" and "the Sultan of Swat", was an American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher and outfielder who played for 22 seasons on three teams, from 1914 through 1935. He was known for his hitting brilliance setting career records in his time for home runs (714, since broken), slugging percentage (.690), runs batted in (RBI) (2,213, since broken), bases on balls (2,062, since broken), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164). Ruth originally entered the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox as a starting pitcher, but after he was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919, he converted to a full-time right fielder. He subsequently became one of the American League's most prolific hitters and with his home run hitting prowess, he helped the Yankees win seven pennants and four World Series titles. Ruth retired in 1935 after a short stint with the Boston Braves, and the following year, he became one of the first five players to be elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

MLB Records

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). In a career spanning 1986 to 2007, Bonds played his first seven seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates before spending 15 years with the San Francisco Giants. He is the son of former major league All-Star Bobby Bonds.

RBI is an acronym for "run batted in", a term used in baseball.

RBI may also refer to:

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American professional baseball player who spent the majority of his Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a center fielder with the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

Mays won two MVP awards and shares the All-Star record of most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron & Stan Musial. Ted Williams said, "They invented the All-Star Game for Willie Mays." Mays ended his career with 660 home runs, third at the time of his retirement, and currently fourth all-time. He was a center fielder and won a record-tying 12 Gold Gloves starting the year the award was introduced six seasons into his career.

Baseball

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 1,892 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 1,892 Phillies, 187 have had surnames beginning with the letter S. Three of those players are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: shortstop Ryne Sandberg, who played one season for the Phillies before being traded to the Chicago Cubs and converting to second base; right fielder Casey Stengel, who played for the Phillies during the 1920 and 1921 seasons and was inducted as a manager; and third baseman Mike Schmidt, who in 1983 was named the greatest Phillie of all time during the election of Philadelphia's Centennial Team. Schmidt is this list's only Hall of Famer to have the Phillies listed as his primary team, and is one of five members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; the others are second baseman Juan Samuel, pitcher Bobby Shantz (inducted as a Philadelphia Athletic), pitcher Chris Short, and pitcher Curt Simmons. Schmidt holds numerous franchise records, including most hits (2,234) and most total bases (4,404), and is the only Phillie on this list to have his number retired.

José Miguel Cabrera Torres (born April 18, 1983), commonly known as Miguel Cabrera is a Venezuelan professional baseball third baseman with the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He bats and throws right-handed. He can also play first base, left field and right field. Cabrera is an eight-time All-Star, having been selected to both the National League and American League All-Star Teams. Cabrera has started at least 100 games at first base, third base, left field and right field. He progressed through the Florida Marlins minor league system, before being called up from the Double-A Carolina Mudcats in June 2003. Cabrera went on to help the Marlins win the World Series that year as their clean-up hitter.

Cabrera is widely regarded to be one of the best pure hitters in baseball, hitting at a high average with power to all fields. He has posted at least 30 home runs in nine different seasons with a career batting average of .321. Cabrera has also driven in over 100 runs in each of the last ten seasons, every season aside from his rookie campaign when he played in only 87 games. He has been an MVP caliber player since entering the majors at just 20 years old, having received MVP votes in each of his ten major league seasons, and placing in the top five in six of those seasons including each of the last four.

José Miguel Cabrera Torres (born April 18, 1983), commonly known as Miguel Cabrera is a Venezuelan professional baseball third baseman with the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He bats and throws right-handed. He can also play first base, left field and right field. Cabrera is an eight-time All-Star, having been selected to both the National League and American League All-Star Teams. Cabrera has started at least 100 games at first base, third base, left field and right field. He progressed through the Florida Marlins minor league system, before being called up from the Double-A Carolina Mudcats in June 2003. Cabrera went on to help the Marlins win the World Series that year as their clean-up hitter.

Cabrera is widely regarded to be one of the best pure hitters in baseball, hitting at a high average with power to all fields. He has posted at least 30 home runs in nine different seasons with a career batting average of .321. Cabrera has also driven in over 100 runs in each of the last ten seasons, every season aside from his rookie campaign when he played in only 87 games. He has been an MVP caliber player since entering the majors at just 20 years old, having received MVP votes in each of his ten major league seasons, and placing in the top five in six of those seasons including each of the last four.

Miguel Mateo Maldonado y Cabrera (1695–1768) was a painter from the Viceroyalty of New Spain, in today's Mexico. During his lifetime, he was recognized as the greatest painter in all of New Spain.

Cabrera was born in Antequera, today's Oaxaca, Oaxaca, and moved to Mexico City in 1719. He may have studied under the Rodríguez Juárez brothers or José de Ibarra.

              

The Detroit Tigers are a Major League Baseball team located in Detroit, Michigan. One of the American League's eight charter franchises, the club was founded in Detroit in 1894 as part of the Western League. They are the oldest continuous one-name, one-city franchise in the American League. The Tigers have won four World Series championships (1935, 1945, 1968, and 1984), 11 American League Pennants (1907, 1908, 1909, 1934, 1935, 1940, 1945, 1968, 1984, 2006, and 2012), and three American League Central Division championships (2011, 2012 and 2013). The Tigers also won Division titles in 1972, 1984 and 1987 while members of the American League East. The team currently plays its home games at Comerica Park in Downtown Detroit.

Ángel Cabrera (pronounced: [ˈaŋxel kaˈβɾeɾa]; born 12 September 1969) is an Argentine professional golfer who plays on both the European Tour and PGA Tour. He is known affectionately as "El Pato" in Spanish or in English as "The Duck" for his waddling gait. He is a two-time major champion, having won the 2007 U.S. Open and the 2009 Masters, in each becoming the first Argentine to win either tournament. He also lost in a sudden death playoff at the 2013 Masters.

                             

The Miami Marlins are a professional baseball team based in Miami, Florida and a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball (MLB's) National League. Their home park is Marlins Park.

Prince Semien Fielder (born May 9, 1984) is an American professional baseball player for the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball.

Fielder, a first baseman, began his MLB career in the first round of the 2002 Major League Baseball Draft, where he was selected by the Milwaukee Brewers out of Eau Gallie High School in Melbourne, Florida. He spent the first seven years of his Major League Baseball career with the Brewers before signing with the Detroit Tigers in January 2012.

The 2012 World Series was the 108th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series. The San Francisco Giants, the National League champion, won the best-of-seven playoff in a four game sweep over the American League champion Detroit Tigers. The 2012 title marked the Giants' seventh World Series title in franchise history, their second in San Francisco (the New York Giants won five), and their second in a three-year period (2010–2012). The Giants' World Series sweep was the first by a National League team since the Cincinnati Reds swept the Oakland Athletics in the 1990 World Series. The Giants' Pablo Sandoval, who in Game 1 tied a record by hitting three home runs in one World Series game, two off Tigers' ace Justin Verlander, was named the World Series Most Valuable Player (MVP).

The San Francisco Giants held home field advantage for the best-of-seven World Series: San Francisco hosted Games 1 and 2, and would have hosted Games 6 and 7 if these had been necessary to decide the Series. The 2012 World Series began on Wednesday, October 24, at AT&T Park in San Francisco, California. The Series ended on Sunday, October 28, at Comerica Park in Detroit, Michigan, with the conclusion of the fourth game.

In Major League Baseball, a player earns the Triple Crown when he leads a league in three specific statistical categories. When used without a modifier, the Triple Crown generally refers to a batter who leads either the National or American leagues in batting average, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI) over a full regular season. The Triple Crown epitomizes three separate attributes of a good hitter: hitting for average, hitting for power, and producing runs. It has been accomplished 17 times, with Miguel Cabrera being the most recent to accomplish the feat in 2012, the first since Carl Yastrzemski in 1967.

The pitching Triple Crown is accomplished by a pitcher who leads the league in wins, strikeouts, and earned run average (ERA). The pitching Triple Crown has been accomplished 38 times, including 8 since 1997.

The Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award, given to one outstanding player in the American League and one in the National League. Since 1931, it has been awarded by the Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA). The winners receive the Kenesaw Mountain Landis Memorial Baseball Award, which became the official name of the award in 1944, in honor of the first MLB commissioner, who served from 1920 until his death on November 25, 1944.

MVP voting takes place before the postseason, but the results are not announced until after the World Series. The BBWAA began by polling three writers in each league city in 1938, reducing that number to two per league city in 1961. The BBWAA does not offer a clear-cut definition of what "most valuable" means, instead leaving the judgment to the individual voters.

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League and the National League, as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.

The prize is presented to outfielders irrespective of their specific position. This means that it is possible for three left fielders, or any other combination of outfielders, to win the award in the same year, rather than one left fielder, one center fielder, and one right fielder. In addition, only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include the designated hitter, who replaces the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead.

RBI

Run batted in (plural, runs batted in; and, abbreviated as RBI) is a statistic used in baseball and softball to credit a batter when the outcome of his or her at bat results in a run being scored, except in certain situations such as when an error is made on the play. The first team to track RBIs was the Buffalo Bisons. However, Major League Baseball did not recognize the RBI as an official statistic until 1920.

Common nicknames for an RBI include "Ribby" and "Rib." The plural of RBI is "RBIs" (just as the plural of the acronym for prisoner of war – POW – is POWs) This is because acronyms become bona fide words as language evolves, and as with other words attract a plural suffix at the end to be made plural, even if the first word is the main noun in the spelled-out form.

Text on viewable page says "A pitcher will push off the rubber with his front foot", but the pitcher pushes off the rubber with his BACK foot.


In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run, increasingly rare in modern baseball, where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself. Likewise, the pitcher is recorded as having given up a hit, a run for each runner that scores including the batter.

Home runs are among the most popular aspects of baseball and, as a result, prolific home run hitters are usually the most popular among fans and consequently the highest paid by teams — hence the old saying, variously attributed to slugger Ralph Kiner, or to a teammate talking about Kiner, "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs, and singles hitters drive Fords."

Alexander Emmanuel "Alex" Rodriguez (born July 27, 1975), nicknamed "A-Rod," is an American baseball third baseman for the New York Yankees of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played shortstop for the Seattle Mariners and the Texas Rangers. Rodriguez was one of the most prodigious young players scouts had ever seen and is now considered one of the greatest baseball players of all time. However, Rodriguez has led a highly controversial career due to his expensive contracts and his use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

He is the youngest player ever to hit 500 home runs, breaking the record Jimmie Foxx set in 1939, and the youngest to hit 600, besting Babe Ruth's record by over a year. Rodriguez has 14 100-RBI seasons in his career, more than any other player in history. On September 24, 2010, Rodriguez hit two home runs, surpassing Sammy Sosa's mark of 609 home runs, and became the all-time leader in home runs by a player of Hispanic descent.

MLB Records

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), nicknamed "the Bambino" and "the Sultan of Swat", was an American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher and outfielder who played for 22 seasons on three teams, from 1914 through 1935. He was known for his hitting brilliance setting career records in his time for home runs (714, since broken), slugging percentage (.690), runs batted in (RBI) (2,213, since broken), bases on balls (2,062, since broken), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164). Ruth originally entered the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox as a starting pitcher, but after he was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919, he converted to a full-time right fielder. He subsequently became one of the American League's most prolific hitters and with his home run hitting prowess, he helped the Yankees win seven pennants and four World Series titles. Ruth retired in 1935 after a short stint with the Boston Braves, and the following year, he became one of the first five players to be elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

MLB Records

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). In a career spanning 1986 to 2007, Bonds played his first seven seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates before spending 15 years with the San Francisco Giants. He is the son of former major league All-Star Bobby Bonds.

RBI is an acronym for "run batted in", a term used in baseball.

RBI may also refer to:

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American professional baseball player who spent the majority of his Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a center fielder with the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

Mays won two MVP awards and shares the All-Star record of most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron & Stan Musial. Ted Williams said, "They invented the All-Star Game for Willie Mays." Mays ended his career with 660 home runs, third at the time of his retirement, and currently fourth all-time. He was a center fielder and won a record-tying 12 Gold Gloves starting the year the award was introduced six seasons into his career.

Baseball

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 1,892 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 1,892 Phillies, 187 have had surnames beginning with the letter S. Three of those players are members of the Baseball Hall of Fame: shortstop Ryne Sandberg, who played one season for the Phillies before being traded to the Chicago Cubs and converting to second base; right fielder Casey Stengel, who played for the Phillies during the 1920 and 1921 seasons and was inducted as a manager; and third baseman Mike Schmidt, who in 1983 was named the greatest Phillie of all time during the election of Philadelphia's Centennial Team. Schmidt is this list's only Hall of Famer to have the Phillies listed as his primary team, and is one of five members of this list to be elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame; the others are second baseman Juan Samuel, pitcher Bobby Shantz (inducted as a Philadelphia Athletic), pitcher Chris Short, and pitcher Curt Simmons. Schmidt holds numerous franchise records, including most hits (2,234) and most total bases (4,404), and is the only Phillie on this list to have his number retired.

José Antonio Bautista (born October 19, 1980) is a Dominican professional baseball right fielder for the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball. He has major league experience at six different positions, because of his role as a utility player earlier in his career.

Bautista was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 20th round of the 2000 First Year Player Draft. After spending three seasons in the minor leagues, Bautista made his major league debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2004. He spent the rest of the season with five MLB organizations, returning finally to the Pirates. He played with the Pirates for parts of five seasons where he struggled to perform at a high level, and eventually found himself traded to the Blue Jays on August 21, 2008. Beginning in September 2009, and over the next two seasons, Bautista would emerge as one of the best players in the major leagues.

José Antonio Bautista (born October 19, 1980) is a Dominican professional baseball right fielder for the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball. He has major league experience at six different positions, because of his role as a utility player earlier in his career.

Bautista was drafted by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 20th round of the 2000 First Year Player Draft. After spending three seasons in the minor leagues, Bautista made his major league debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2004. He spent the rest of the season with five MLB organizations, returning finally to the Pirates. He played with the Pirates for parts of five seasons where he struggled to perform at a high level, and eventually found himself traded to the Blue Jays on August 21, 2008. Beginning in September 2009, and over the next two seasons, Bautista would emerge as one of the best players in the major leagues.

José Joaquín Bautista Arias (born July 25, 1964) is a former right-handed pitcher who played in Major League Baseball from 1988 to 1997. Bautista is observantly Jewish, born to a Dominican father and an Israeli mother. His mother's family was originally from Russia, as is his wife. Bautista and his wife maintain a Kosher home, as do fellow Jewish former Major Leaguers Ken Holtzman and Jesse Levis. Despite the fact that several Major Leaguers are from the Dominican Republic, Jose is the only Jewish player from their small Jewish community that numbers around 300 persons.

Bautista was signed by the New York Mets as an amateur free agent in April 1981. In 1984 he was 13–4 with a 3.13 ERA for Columbia in the South Atlantic League, and in 1985, 15–8 with a 2.34 ERA for Lynchburg in the Carolina League.

                   

The Toronto Blue Jays are a professional baseball team located in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. The Blue Jays are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s American League (AL).

Juan Bautista José Cabanilles (also Juan Bautista Josep, Valencian: Joan) (6 September 1644 in Algemesí near Valencia – 29 April 1712 in Valencia) was a Spanish organist and composer at Valencia Cathedral. He is considered by many to have been the greatest Spanish Baroque composer, and has been]by whom?[ called the Spanish Bach.

He probably began his musical career as a singer in a choir of a local church. Later he studied to become a priest in the cathedral at Valencia, which included lessons in music. On 15 May 1665, at 20 years of age, he was named the assistant organist of the cathedral. A year later, upon the death of his predecessor, he became the principal organist. On 22 September 1668 he was ordained as a priest. He kept his position as principal organist for 45 years, but from 1703 on his health often necessitated that a substitute be found. From 1675 to 1677 he also took charge of teaching the children in the cathedral choir.

In baseball, a home run (abbreviated HR) is scored when the ball is hit in such a way that the batter is able to reach home safely in one play without any errors being committed by the defensive team in the process. In modern baseball, the feat is typically achieved by hitting the ball over the outfield fence between the foul poles (or making contact with either foul pole) without first touching the ground, resulting in an automatic home run. There is also the "inside-the-park" home run, increasingly rare in modern baseball, where the batter reaches home safely while the baseball is in play on the field. When a home run is scored, the batter is also credited with a hit and a run scored, and an RBI for each runner that scores, including himself. Likewise, the pitcher is recorded as having given up a hit, a run for each runner that scores including the batter.

Home runs are among the most popular aspects of baseball and, as a result, prolific home run hitters are usually the most popular among fans and consequently the highest paid by teams — hence the old saying, variously attributed to slugger Ralph Kiner, or to a teammate talking about Kiner, "Home run hitters drive Cadillacs, and singles hitters drive Fords."

José Fernando Bautista Quintero is a Colombian lawyer and politician. Bautista was appointed Ambassador of Colombia to Venezuela by President Juan Manuel Santos Calderón to mend relations with the administration of President Hugo Chávez Frías after the 2010 Colombia–Venezuela diplomatic crisis that had driven the two neighbouring nations to the brink of armed conflict. He has also served as the President of the Agrarian Bank of Colombia, Minister of Communications, Mayor of Cúcuta, and Colombian Consul in Pretoria, and São Paulo.

In 1996 while serving as General Secretary of the Colombian Liberal Party, President Ernesto Samper Pizano appointed Bautista as Deputy Minister of Communications, officially being sworn in on 27 August 1996. The next year on 26 August 1997, Bautista was appointed Minister of Communications replacing his former boss Saulo Arboleda Gómez.

Prince Semien Fielder (born May 9, 1984) is an American professional baseball player for the Detroit Tigers of Major League Baseball.

Fielder, a first baseman, began his MLB career in the first round of the 2002 Major League Baseball Draft, where he was selected by the Milwaukee Brewers out of Eau Gallie High School in Melbourne, Florida. He spent the first seven years of his Major League Baseball career with the Brewers before signing with the Detroit Tigers in January 2012.

The 2010 Toronto Blue Jays season was the 34th season of Major League Baseball's Toronto Blue Jays franchise, and the team's 21st full season of play (22nd overall) at the Rogers Centre. The 2010 season was the first under general manager Alex Anthopoulos, who replaced J. P. Ricciardi after the 2009 season.

After a poor 2009 season in which the Blue Jays finished with a 75–87 record, 2010 saw the team improve by 10 games, finishing with an 85–77 record and in fourth place in the American League East. Led by José Bautista, whose 54 home runs set a franchise record and led the Major Leagues, the team also set a franchise record with 257 home runs.

José Juan Bautista Pampuro (born December 28, 1949) is an Argentine politician. He is a member of the Justicialist Party, was formerly a Defense Minister and is currently a senator for Buenos Aires Province. He serves as the Senate provisional President and is second in line for the presidential succession.

Pampuro was born in Buenos Aires in 1949. He enrolled at the University of Buenos Aires and earned a Medical Degree. He entered public service in 1983, when he was named Public Health Secretary to the Mayor of Lanús, Manuel Quindimil. He was elected to the Lower House of Congress on the populist Justicialist Party ticket in 1987, and was named Minister of Health and Social Policy for Buenos Aires Province by newly elected Governor Eduardo Duhalde in 1991.

This is a list of the top 300 Major League Baseball home run hitters. In the sport of baseball, a home run is a hit in which the batter scores by circling all the bases and reaching home plate in one play, without the benefit of a fielding error. This can be accomplished either by hitting the ball out of play while it is still in fair territory (a conventional home run), or by an inside the park home run.

Barry Bonds holds the Major League Baseball home run record with 762. He passed Hank Aaron, who is currently second with 755, on August 7, 2007. The only other player to have hit 700 or more is Babe Ruth with 714. Willie Mays (660), Alex Rodriguez (654), Ken Griffey, Jr. (630), Jim Thome (612) and Sammy Sosa (609) are the only other players to have hit 600 or more.

              

[1] The Royals also qualified for the 1981 American League Division Series by winning the AL West in the second half of the 1981 season, which was split by a players' strike. Kansas City lost in the ALDS to the Oakland A's.

Sports the MLB
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
53