Question:

How many NASCAR races will be left in this season after this Sunday's race?

Answer:

After the Sunoco Red Cross Pennsylvania 500 on Sunday, there are 5 regular races left and then 10 in the Chase for the Sprint Cup.

More Info:

NASCAR

Auto racing (also known as car racing, motor racing or automobile racing) is a sport involving the racing of automobiles for competition. There are numerous different categories of auto racing.

Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Great Britain, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately 0.25 to 2.66 miles (0.4 to 4.3 kilometers). NASCAR is the world's largest governing body for stock car racing, and its Sprint Cup Series is the de facto premier series of stock car racing. Top level races are 200 to 600 miles (322 to 966 km) in length.

Average speeds in the top classes are usually 70–80% of comparable levels of open wheel racing at the same tracks. Some stock cars may reach speeds in excess of 200 mph (322 km/h) at tracks such as Daytona International Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway. These tracks have come to be known as "restrictor plate tracks", a name that is derived from the "restrictor plate" device that was designed to limit top speeds to approximately 192 mph (309 km/h) on such tracks.

Sprint Corporation also known as Sprint, is a United States telecommunications holding company that provides wireless services and is also a major global Internet carrier. It's the third largest U.S. wireless network operator as of 2013, and served more than 54 million customers at the end of the third quarter of 2013, in addition to the Sprint brand, the company also offers wireless voice, messaging, and broadband services through its various subsidiaries under the Boost Mobile, Virgin Mobile, and Assurance Wireless brands, as well as wholesale access to its wireless networks to mobile virtual network operators. The company is headquartered in Overland Park, Kansas. In July 2013, a majority of the company was purchased by Japanese telecommunications company SoftBank Corporation, although the remaining shares of the company continue to trade on the New York Stock Exchange.

Sprint traces its origins to the Brown Telephone Company, which was founded in 1899 to deploy telephone service to the rural area around Abilene, Kansas. In 2006, Sprint exited the local landline telephone business, spinning those assets off into a newly created company named Embarq, which later became a part of CenturyLink. The company continues to be one of the largest long distance providers in the United States.

Acme 500 (1973)

Purolator 500 (1974-1976)

The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (often shortened to Sprint Cup or the Cup Series) is the top racing series of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR). The series is named for its current sponsor, the Sprint Corporation, and has been known by other names in the past. It was originally known as the Strictly Stock Series (1949) and shortly became the Grand National Series (1950–1970). While leasing its naming rights to R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, it was known as the Winston Cup Series (1971–2003). A similar deal was made with NEXTEL in 2003, becoming the NEXTEL Cup Series (2004–2007) and it became the Sprint Cup after Sprint acquired NEXTEL in 2005. The name "Sprint" refers specifically to the subsidiary of Japanese telecommunications company SoftBank which is the entitlement sponsor; sprint car racing is a separate racing discipline.

The drivers' champion is determined by a point system where points are given according to finishing placement and laps led. The season is divided into two segments. After the first 26 races, the 10 highest ranked drivers, plus the two drivers with the most race wins of those ranked from 11th through 20th in points, are seeded based on their total number of wins and compete in the last 10 races with the difference in points greatly minimized. This is called the Chase for the Championship.

Sunoco

Acme 500 (1973)

Purolator 500 (1974-1976)

NASCAR on ESPN is the coverage of NASCAR on ESPN, ESPN2, and ABC. ABC, and later ESPN, carried NASCAR races from the sanctioning body's top three divisions at various points from the early 1960s until 2002. ESPN resumed coverage of NASCAR with the Nationwide Series race at Daytona in February 2007 and the Sprint Cup Series at Indianapolis in July 2007. ESPN currently holds the rights to broadcast the final 17 races of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series season, including the entire Chase for the Sprint Cup as well as the entire NASCAR Nationwide Series season through the respective series' 2014 seasons.

In mid-2013, NBC Sports outbid the ESPN for rights to the final 20 Sprint Cup races and the second half of the Nationwide schedule for the next 10 years. ESPN will no longer be broadcasting NASCAR after the 2014 season.

Sports

The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is an international humanitarian movement with approximately 97 million volunteers, members and staff worldwide which was founded to protect human life and health, to ensure respect for all human beings, and to prevent and alleviate human suffering.

The movement consists of several distinct organizations that are legally independent from each other, but are united within the movement through common basic principles, objectives, symbols, statutes and governing organisations. The movement's parts are:

the Sprint Cup Sprint
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