Question:

How many miles does a 1985 Ford Ranger v6 get to the gallon, and how many gallons does it hold?

Answer:

MY 85 FORD RANGER GETS ABOUT 22MPG

More Info:

The Ford Ranger is a nameplate that has been used on two distinct model lines of pickup trucks sold by the Ford Motor Company, a version sold in North America and later parts of South America, as well as a separate model sold internationally.

Ford designed and engineered the North American version of the Ranger, which commenced manufacture in January 1982 for the 1983 model year and ended production in December 2011. For the 1995 model year, Ford exported the North American model to select Latin and South American countries; however, as demand increased, Ford began producing the model at its Argentinian plant. During the 1994 through 2010 model years, Mazda badge engineered this model as the North American "B-Series" replacing the "international" version of the Mazda B-Series that had previously been retailed in North America. During its 29-year production run, the Ranger received several updates: notably, the 1989 model year facelift, the introduction of the second-generation model for 1993, a 1998 model year facelift of the same, and several smaller second-generation cosmetic changes in the 2001, 2004, and 2006 model years. The Latin and South American version was re-skinned in 2009 for the 2010 model year, receiving all-new exterior sheet metal while retaining the existing body structure.

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A pickup truck, often simply referred to as a pickup or pick-up, is a light motor vehicle with an open-top, rear cargo area (bed).

In North America, the term pickup is used for light trucks with a lighter duty chassis and factory built, integrated bed, as well as for coupé utility vehicles, often based on a personal car chassis, but also often on a special dedicated chassis for such use.

The Ford Motor Company (also known as simply Ford) is an American multinational automaker headquartered in Dearborn, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. It was founded by Henry Ford and incorporated on June 16, 1903. The company sells automobiles and commercial vehicles under the Ford brand and luxury cars under the Lincoln brand. In the past it has also produced heavy trucks, tractors and automotive components. Ford owns small stakes in Mazda of Japan and Aston Martin of the United Kingdom. It is listed on the New York Stock Exchange and is controlled by the Ford family, although they have minority ownership. It is described by Forbes as "the most important industrial company in the history of the United States."

Ford introduced methods for large-scale manufacturing of cars and large-scale management of an industrial workforce using elaborately engineered manufacturing sequences typified by moving assembly lines; by 1914 these methods were known around the world as Fordism. Ford's former UK subsidiaries Jaguar and Land Rover, acquired in 1989 and 2000 respectively, were sold to Tata Motors in March 2008. Ford owned the Swedish automaker Volvo from 1999 to 2010. In 2011, Ford discontinued the Mercury brand, under which it had marketed entry-level luxury cars in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Middle East since 1938.

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A mid-size car (occasionally referred to as an intermediate) is the North American/Australian standard for an automobile with a size equal to or greater than that of a compact. In Europe mid-sizers are referred to as D-segment or large family cars.

The automobile that defined this size in the United States was the Rambler Six that was introduced in 1956, although it was called "compact" car at that time. The mid-size class then grew out of the compacts of the early-1960s. For example, the Ford Fairlane was referred to at its introduction in 1962 as a compact intermediate because it was barely bigger than its close relative, the Falcon. General Motors' first entries in the class, such as the Oldsmobile F-85, Pontiac Tempest, and Buick Special were not mechanically related to the compact Chevrolet Corvair, but were similar in size.

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