Question:

How many joules are in a calorie?

Answer:

A joule is the energy exerted by the force of one newton acting to move an object through a distance of one meter. 1 calorie converts to 4.1868 Joules.

More Info:

energy Physics Joule

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to physics:

Physics – natural science that involves the study of matter and its motion through spacetime, along with related concepts such as energy and force. More broadly, it is the general analysis of nature, conducted in order to understand how the universe behaves.

Calorie Energy RT

The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule.

The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg).]verification needed[ It is still used in metric English-speaking countries (such as Canada), and remains the standard unit of classification for air conditioning units manufactured and sold in many non-English-speaking metric countries.]verification needed[ In North America, BTU describes the heat value (energy content) of fuels.

Environment

Because energy is defined via work, the SI unit for energy is the same as the unit of work – the joule (J), named in honour of James Prescott Joule and his experiments on the mechanical equivalent of heat. In slightly more fundamental terms, 1 joule is equal to 1 newton-metre and, in terms of SI base units

An energy unit that is used in atomic physics, particle physics and high energy physics is the electronvolt (eV). One eV  is equivalent to  J−191.60217653×10. In spectroscopy the unit cm−1 = 0.000123986 eV is used to represent energy since energy is inversely proportional to wavelength from the equation  E = h \nu = h c/\lambda .

Measurement

The International System of Units (SI) specifies a set of seven base units from which all other SI units of measurement are derived.

Each of these other units (SI derived units) is either dimensionless or can be expressed as a product of (positive or negative, but usually integral) powers of one or more of the base units. For example, the SI derived unit of area is the square metre (m2), and the SI derived unit of density is the kilogram per cubic metre (kg/m3 or kg m-3). The degree Celsius (see the table below) has a somewhat unclear status, and is arguably an exception to this rule.

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