Question:

How many different types of candy bars are made in the USA?

Answer:

No exact number is found, but throughout the United States as many as 40,000 different candy bars have appeared on the scene.

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Munch is a candy bar manufactured by Mars, Incorporated and sold in the United States. The bar was introduced in 1970 as the Snickers Munch Bar and was later relabeled "Munch". It is made of only six ingredients: peanuts, sugar, butter, corn syrup, salt and soy lecithin. The candy bar contains no chocolate and is comparable to peanut brittle, though the Munch bar has a higher density of peanuts compared to most brittles. Due to its short list of simple ingredients, it is marketed as being healthy and natural.
Candy, specifically sugar candy, is a confection made from a concentrated solution of sugar in water, to which flavorings and colorants are added. Candies come in numerous colors and varieties and have a long history in popular culture. The Middle English word candy began to be used in the late 13th century, coming into English from the Old French çucre candi, derived in turn from Persian Qand (=قند) and Qandi (=قندی), "cane sugar", probably derived from Sanskrit word khanda (खण्ड) "piece (of sugar)", perhaps from Dravidian (cf. Tamil kantu for candy, or kattu "to harden, condense"). In North America, some use candy as a broad category that may include candy bars, chocolates, licorice, sour candies, salty candies, tart candies, hard candies, taffies, gumdrops, marshmallows, and more.][ Vegetables or fruit, or nuts which have been glazed and coated with sugar are said to be candied. Outside North America, the generic English-language name for candy is sweets or confectionery (United Kingdom, Ireland, South Africa and other commonwealth countries). In Australia and New Zealand, small pieces of sweet substance are known as "lollies". In North America, Australia, the Caribbean, NZ and the UK, the word "lollipop" refers specifically to sugar candy with flavoring on a stick. While not used in the generic sense of North America, the term candy is used in the UK for specific types of foods such as candy floss (cotton candy in North America and fairy floss in Australia), and certain other sugar based products such as candied fruit. The global sales of sugar confectionery candy market in 2010 were about $57.5 billion. Before sugar was readily available, candy was made from honey. Honey was used in Ancient China, Middle East, Egypt, Greece and the Roman Empire to coat fruits and flowers to preserve them or to create forms of candy. Candy is still served in this form today, though now it is more typically seen as a type of garnish. Candy was originally a form of medicine, either used to calm the digestive system or cool a sore throat. In the Middle Ages candy appeared on the tables of only the most wealthy at first. At that time it began as a combination of spices and sugar that was used as an aid to digestive problems. Digestive problems were very common during this time due to the constant consumption of food that was neither fresh nor well balanced. Banquet hosts would typically serve these types of 'candies' at banquets for their guests. One of these candies, sometimes referred to as a 'chamber spice', was made with cloves, ginger, aniseed, juniper berries, almonds and pine kernels dipped in melted sugar. The first candy came to America in the early eighteenth century from Britain and France. Only a few of the early colonists were proficient in sugar work and were able to provide the sugary treats for the very wealthy. Rock candy, made from crystallized sugar, was the simplest form of candy, but even this basic form of sugar was considered a luxury and was only attainable by the rich. In contrast, since 1979 the world has produced more sugar than can be sold, making it very attainable and cheap. The candy business underwent a drastic change in the 1830s when technological advances and the availability of sugar opened up the market. The new market was not only for the enjoyment of the rich but also for the pleasure of the working class as well. There was also an increasing market for children. Confectioners were no longer the venue for the wealthy and high class but for children as well. While some fine confectioners remained, the candy store became a staple of the child of the American working class. Penny candies epitomized this transformation of candy. Penny candy became the first material good that children spent their own money on. For this reason candy store-owners relied almost entirely on the business of children to keep them running. Even penny candies were directly descended from medicated lozenges that held bitter medicine in a hard sugar coating. In 1847, the invention of the candy press (also known as a toy machine) made it possible to produce multiple shapes and sizes of candy at once. In 1851, confectioners began to use a revolving steam pan to assist in boiling sugar. This transformation meant that the candy maker was no longer required to continuously stir the boiling sugar. The heat from the surface of the pan was also much more evenly distributed and made it less likely the sugar would burn. These innovations made it possible for only one or two people to successfully run a candy business. Chemically, sugar candies are broadly divided into two groups: crystalline candies and amorphous candies. Crystalline candies are not as hard as crystals of the mineral variety, but derive their name and their texture from their microscopically organized sugar structure, formed through a process of crystallization, which makes them easy to bite or cut into. Fudge, creams, and fondant are examples of crystalline candies. Amorphous candies have a disorganized crystalline structure. They usually have higher sugar concentrations, and the texture may be chewy, hard, or brittle. Caramels, nut brittles and toffees are examples of amorphous candies. Commercially, candies are often divided into three groups, according to the amount of sugar they contain: Each of these three groups contains both crystalline and amorphous candies. Candy is made by dissolving sugar in water or milk to form a syrup, which is boiled until it reaches the desired concentration or starts to caramelize. The type of candy depends on the ingredients and how long the mixture is boiled. Candy comes in a wide variety of textures, from soft and chewy to hard and brittle. Some examples are: caramel candy, toffee, fudge, praline, tablet, gumdrops, jelly beans, rock candy, lollipops, taffy, cotton candy, candy canes, peppermint sticks, peanut brittle, chocolate-coated raisins or peanuts, hard candy (called boiled sweets in British English) and candy bars. The final texture of candy depends on the sugar concentration. As the syrup is heated, it boils, water evaporates, the sugar concentration increases, and the boiling point rises. A given temperature corresponds to a particular sugar concentration. In general, higher temperatures and greater sugar concentrations result in hard, brittle candies, and lower temperatures result in softer candies. The stages of sugar cooking are as follows: The names come from the methods used to test the syrup before thermometers became affordable. The "thread" stage is tested by cooling a little syrup, and pulling it between the thumb and forefinger. When the correct stage is reached, a thread will form. This stage is used for making syrups. For subsequent stages, a small spoonful of syrup is dropped into cold water, and the characteristics of the resulting lump are evaluated to determine the concentration of the syrup. A smooth lump indicates "ball" stages, with the corresponding hardness described. At the "soft crack" stage, the syrup forms threads that are just pliable. At the "hard crack" stage, the threads are brittle. This method is still used today in some kitchens. A candy thermometer is more convenient, but has the drawback of not automatically adjusting for local conditions such as altitude, as the cold water test does. Once the syrup reaches or higher, the sucrose molecules break down into many simpler sugars, creating an amber-colored substance known as caramel. This should not be confused with caramel candy, although it is the candy's main flavoring. Some candy, including marshmallows and gummi bears, contain gelatin derived from animal collagen, a protein found in skin and bones, and is thus avoided by vegans and some vegetarians. "Kosher gelatin" is also unsuitable for vegetarians and vegans, as it is derived from fish bones. Other substances, such as agar, pectin, starch and gum arabic may also be used as setting and gelling agents, and can be used in place of gelatin. Other ingredients commonly found in candy that are not suitable for vegetarian or vegan diets include carmine, a red dye made from cochineal beetles, and confectioner's glaze, which may contain wings or other insect parts. Because of its high sugar concentration, bacteria are not usually able to grow in candy. As a result, the shelf life of candy is longer than for many foods. Most candies can be safely stored in their original packaging at room temperature in a dry, dark cupboard for months or years. As a rule, the softer the candy or the damper the storage area, the sooner it goes stale. Shelf life considerations with most candies are focused on appearance, taste, and texture, rather than about the potential for food poisoning. That is, old candy may not look pretty or taste very good, even though it is very unlikely to make the eater sick. Candy can be made unsafe by storing it badly, such as in a wet, moldy area. Typical recommendations are these: Candy generally contains sugar, which can be involved in tooth decay causing cavities. Sugar is a food for several types of bacteria commonly found in the mouth, particularly Streptococcus mutans; when the bacteria metabolize the sugar they create acids in the mouth which demineralize the tooth enamel and can lead to dental caries. To help prevent this dentists recommend that individuals should brush their teeth regularly, particularly after every meal and snack. Sugar is often cited as the source of insufficient dentistry, but is in fact the streptococcus bacteria that feed on sugar, not the sweet substance itself, that causes poor teeth. The bacteria eats away tooth enamel the longer it stays in contact with teeth, so the amount of sugar consumed is less important than the time it is left on and in between the teeth. Most candy, particularly low-fat candy, has a high glycemic index (GI), which means that it causes a rapid rise in blood sugar levels after ingestion. This is chiefly a concern for people with diabetes, but could also be dangerous to the health of non-diabetics. Candies that primarily consist of peppermint and mint, such as candy canes, have digestive benefits. Peppermint oil can help soothe an upset stomach by creating defense against irritable bowel syndrome and is effective in killing germs. Mint-flavored gum increases short-term memory, heart rate, and the amount of oxygen in the brain. The correlation between heart rate and oxygen in the brain triggers short-term memory. Chewing gum can also provide a burst of insulin in the anticipation for food. When eaten in moderation, dark chocolate can have health benefits. The cocoa in chocolate can help reduce the risk of heart disease. Vitamins and minerals such as calcium, magnesium, and sodium can be found in chocolate, as well as antioxidants. In a study of approximately 8,000 individuals, candy consumers enjoyed an average of 0.92 years of longer life, with greater consumption of candy not associated with progressively lower mortality. Non-consumers typically ate less red meat and salads, drank more and were more likely to smoke. Mortality was lowest among those consuming candy 1–3 times a month and highest among those consuming candy three or more times a week. The study concluded that one possible explanation for this was the presence of antioxidant phenols in chocolate, but the study could not differentiate between consumption of sugar candy and chocolate in they study. Some kinds of candy have been contaminated with an excessive amount of lead in it. Hard, round candies are a leading cause of choking deaths in children. Some types of candy, such as Lychee Mini Fruity Gels, have been associated with so many choking deaths that their import or manufacture is banned by some countries. Candy wrapper or sweets wrapper is a common term for this packaging. Packaging preserves aroma and flavor and eases shipping and dispensation. Wax paper seals against air, moisture, dust, and germs, while cellophane is valued by packagers for its transparency and resistance to grease, odors and moisture. In addition, it is often resealable. Polyethylene is another form of film sealed with heat, and this material is often used to make bags in bulk packaging. Saran wraps are also common. Aluminum foils wrap chocolate bars and prevent transfer of water vapor, while being lightweight, non-toxic and odor proof. Vegetable parchment lines boxes of high-quality confections like gourmet chocolates. Cardboard cartons are less common, though they offer many options concerning thickness and movement of water and oil. Packages are often sealed with a starch-based adhesive derived from tapioca, potato, wheat, sago, or sweet potato. Occasionally, glues are made from the bones and skin of cattle and hogs for a stronger and more flexible product, but this is not as common because of the expense. Prior to the 1900s, candy was commonly sold unwrapped from carts in the street, where it was exposed to dirt and insects. By 1914 there were some machines to wrap gum and stick candies, but this was not the common practice. After the polio outbreak in 1916, unwrapped candies garnered widespread censure because of the dirt and germs. At the time, only upscale candy stores used glass jars. With advancements in technology wax paper was adopted, and foil and cellophane were imported][ from France by DuPont in 1925. Necco packagers were one of the first companies to package without human touch. Packaging helps market the product as well. Manufacturers know that candy must be hygienic and attractive to customers. In the children's market quantity, novelty, large size and bright colors are the top sellers. Many companies redesign the packaging to maintain consumer appeal. The table below summarizes some of the top candy brands in the world.
Oh Henry! is a candy bar containing peanuts, caramel, and fudge coated in chocolate. It was first introduced in 1920 by the Williamson Candy Company of Chicago, Illinois. According to legend, Oh Henry! was originally named after a boy who frequented the Williamson company, flirting with the girls who made the candy. The name is also said to be a homage to American writer O. Henry. However, there is no definitive explanation as to the exact origin of the name. Another theory is that the candy bar was invented by a man named Tom Henry of Arkansas City, Kansas. Tom Henry ran a candy company called the Peerless candy factory, and in 1919 he started making the Tom Henry candy bar. He sold the candy bar to Williamson Candy Company in 1920, where they later changed the name to "Oh Henry!". Henry's family now runs a candy factory in Dexter, Kansas, that sells "momma henry" bars, which are nearly identical to the original candy bar. In 1923, an employee of Williamson, John Glossinger, announced that he was going to make the Oh Henry! bar a national best seller. Company officials said it was impossible and denied him the funds for an advertising campaign. Glossinger went into the streets and pasted onto automobile bumpers stickers saying merely "Oh Henry!". People became curious as to what an Oh Henry! was, and sales for the bar rose quickly. Nestlé acquired the United States rights to the brand in 1984 and continues to produce the bar. In Canada, the bar is currently sold by The Hershey Company and was manufactured at their Smiths Falls, Ontario, facilities prior to its closure. Because of Canada's different chocolate standards, the Canadian "Oh Henry!" is not considered a "chocolate bar" and is labeled instead as a "candy bar". In fact, unlike the American version, which labels the bar as "milk chocolate", the Canadian version contains no milk chocolate at all: it contains a chocolatey coating. The bars are also different in appearance: it is one bar with the fudge in the center, the fudge is surrounded with a thin layer of caramel, and the nuts surround that layer before it is surrounded in the chocolatey coating. Hershey sells Oh Henry! bars made in Canada on a very limited basis in the United States as Rally bars, using the trademark of a Hershey product introduced in the 1970s and later discontinued. During Henry Aaron's quest to break Babe Ruth's record for career home runs in Major League Baseball, the bar was briefly advertised as being linked to him, even though it was first marketed years before he was even born.][ Baseball fans in Montreal and Chicago would routinely toss the bars onto the playing field in celebration of a Henry Rodriguez home run. On the American television series Seinfeld, the character of Sue Ellen Mischke, a socialite nemesis of Elaine Benes, is said to be "heiress to the Oh Henry! candy bar fortune". On the American television series All in the Family, Edith Bunker admits to having stolen an Oh Henry! bar from the corner store as a young girl, but years later paid the store back.][ Members of the band Dog Is Dead originally performed together under the name "Oh Henry!" when at school. In chapter 16 of Robert A. Heinlein's 1984 fantasy novel, "Job, A Comedy Of Justice," Margrethe offers Alexander an Oh Henry! bar which she acquired from a coin machine, by purchasing it with a dime from a previous "world" they had visited a short while earlier.
Sweethearts are small heart-shaped candies sold around Valentine's Day. Each conversation heart is printed with a message such as "Be Mine", "Kiss Me", "Call Me", "Let's Get Busy", and "Miss You". Sweethearts are made by the New England Confectionery Company, or Necco. A similar type of candy is sold in the UK under the name Love Hearts. Necco manufactures nearly 8 billion Sweethearts per year. Sweethearts are now available in a variety of assortments to choose from including chocolate, tart, and smoothie flavors. Oliver R. Chase invented a machine in 1847 to cut lozenges from wafer candy, similar to Necco Wafers, and started a candy factory. Daniel Chase, Oliver's brother, began printing sayings on the candy in 1866. He designed a machine that was able to press on the candy similar to a stamp. The candy was often used for weddings since the candies had witty saying such as: "Married in pink, he will take a drink", "Married in White, you have chosen right", and "Married in Satin, Love will not be lasting".
The heart-shaped conversation candies to be called Sweethearts got their start in 1901. Other styles were formerly produced such as lozenges, postcards, horseshoes, watches, and baseballs. As of 2010, the classic pastel candy formula is being abandoned. Sweethearts will be softer candies with vivid colors and all new flavors. Line extensions carrying the Sweethearts brand include chocolates and sugar-free hearts. In the 1990s, Necco vice-president, Walter Marshall, wanted to update some of the sayings and retire others, including "Call me", "Email me", and "Fax me". The romantic expressions continue to be revised for young Americans. Necco receives hundreds of suggestions a year on new sayings.
Necco produces the hearts from late February through mid January of the following year. Approximately 100,000 pounds (45,000 kg) of hearts are made per day, which sells out in about six weeks. The drastic changes to the flavors and messages were unpopular with some fans. As of October 2011, Necco has announced that the switch to natural flavors and colorings for their Necco wafer candies has led to a significant decline in sales, and so they will be returning their products to the original artificial flavors and colors. However, the new recipe for the sweethearts candies that was introduced in 2010 remains in production today.
Summit Candy Bar was manufactured in the early 1980s by Mars in the United States. The candy bar consisted of two wafers covered with peanuts, all coated in chocolate. In 1983 Mars changed to individual foil wrapping and promoted the bar as having 30% more chocolate. Consumer panelists said the modifications were more gimmicky than substantive. The new bar was longer, thinner, and firmer, and received mediocre reviews. Keeping the bar from melting was noted as a problem. Production of the bar was halted and it is no longer available.
The Federal Specification for Candy and Chocolate Confections is a document, enacted by the Federal Supply Service of the United States in 1979, that defines and outlines requirements for candy and chocolates that the Federal Government may use. It further defines the conditions under which a new type of candy may be found suitable for use by government agencies. Part 1 of the Specification defines candies to fall into one of eight Types, which are further grouped by distinctive features within the Types. Candies are also classified in one of five styles, which include bars, rolls, disks, pieces, and bags. The second section of the Specifications contains an extensive list of references to other federal regulations that may apply to candy. Such documents include, for example, Federal Specification L-C-110, which specifies the type of cellophane that may be used for preservative use. Other cross-referenced documents include Federal standards on food packaging, military specifications on labeling, United States Department of Agriculture requirements on quality of food items, and so forth. Section 3 of the Specifications define, in great detail, the process by which applicants may bid for candy supply contracts. In 45 sub-subsections, requirements for ingredients, quality, appearance, and dimensions are laid out in great detail.
Wazoo (often known as the Wazoo bar) is a candy bar manufactured by Topps incorporated. The candy bar comes in two flavors: "Blue Razz" and "Wild Berriez". The name "Wazoo" was under debate because of the Australian slang word of anus. But the title was considered appropriate since it would only be sold in the U.S..

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (US), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic consisting of 50 states, 16 territories, a federal district, and various overseas extraterritorial jurisdictions. The 48 contiguous states and the federal district of Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific. The country also has five populated and nine unpopulated territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. At 3.79 million square miles (9.83 million km2) in total and with around 316 million people, the United States is the fourth-largest country by total area and third largest by population. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries. The geography and climate of the United States is also extremely diverse, and it is home to a wide variety of wildlife.

Paleo-indians migrated from Asia to what is now the US mainland around 15,000 years ago, with European colonization beginning in the 16th century. The United States emerged from 13 British colonies located along the Atlantic seaboard. Disputes between Great Britain and these colonies led to the American Revolution. On July 4, 1776, delegates from the 13 colonies unanimously issued the Declaration of Independence. The ensuing war ended in 1783 with the recognition of independence of the United States from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and was the first successful war of independence against a European colonial empire. The current Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787. The first 10 amendments, collectively named the Bill of Rights, were ratified in 1791 and guarantee many fundamental civil rights and freedoms.

Bar Bartending

A chocolate bar is a confection in bar form comprising some or all of the following components: cocoa solids, cocoa butter, sugar, milk. The relative presence or absence of these components form the subclasses of dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and white chocolate. In addition to these main ingredients, it may contain emulsifiers such as soy lecithin and flavors such as vanilla.

In most of the English-speaking world, chocolate bar also refers to what is typically called a candy bar in American English. This is a form of confectionery usually packaged in a bar or log form, often coated with chocolate, and sized as a snack for one person. But within that term, a wide variety of products exists, ranging from solid chocolate bars to multiple layerings or mixtures of ingredients such as nuts, fruit, caramel or fondant containing no chocolate.

Candy

Candy Candy (キャンディ・キャンディ?) is a Japanese novel, manga, and anime series. The main character, Candice "Candy" White Ardlay is a blonde girl with freckles, large emerald green eyes and long, curly hair, worn in pigtails with bows. Candy Candy first appeared in a prose novel by famed Japanese writer Kyoko Mizuki in April 1975. When Mizuki joined forces with manga artist Yumiko Igarashi, the Japanese magazine Nakayoshi became interested in Candy Candy. The series was serialized as a manga series in the magazine for four years and won the 1st Kodansha Manga Award for shōjo in 1977. The story was adapted into an anime series by Toei Animation. There are also several Candy Candy movies which were never released outside of Japan.]citation needed[

The Candy Candy manga is a "slice of life story" in the shōjo genre. Candy is an abandoned orphan taken in by the orphanage Pony's Home near Lake Michigan around the start of the 20th century. She spends the first years of her life at the orphanage, where she will often return to repose and decide her next course in life. Growing up she gets adopted twice, first by the Leagans who treat her poorly, and after that by a wealthy benefactor whom she does not meet until the end of the story. But he is the heir to an important estate, and a relation of her first love Anthony and his cousins the Cornwell brothers. After Anthony dies, Candy gets an education in London where she meets the rebellious Terry, her second and grand love (in the words of the author Keiko Nagita/Kyoko Mizuki in the essays found on Misaki's website, "the great love that cannot bear fruit"). Circumstances seem to constantly divide the pair. Upon her return to the US, she trains and gains experience as a nurse in Chicago, around the time of World War I, while Terry tries to become a Broadway actor. A member of his theater troup, Susannah, hopes to get between Candy and Terry. Eventually both have to make a decision to sacrifice their own happiness as a couple for the sake of a third person. With the revelation of the identity of her guardian, Candy also discovers who her childhood Prince of the Hill is.

Toxic waste is waste material that can cause death, injury or birth defects to living creatures. It spreads quite easily and can contaminate lakes, rivers, and the atmosphere. The term is often used interchangeably with “hazardous waste”, or discarded material that can pose a long-term risk to health or environment.

Hazardous wastes are poisonous byproducts of manufacturing, farming, city septic systems, construction, automotive garages, laboratories, hospitals and other industries. The waste may be liquid, solid, or sludge and contain chemicals, heavy metals, radiation, dangerous pathogens, or other toxins. Even households generate hazardous waste from items such as batteries, used computer equipment, and leftover paints or pesticides.

Food is any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for the body. It is usually of plant or animal origin, and contains essential nutrients, such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, or minerals. The substance is ingested by an organism and assimilated by the organism's cells in an effort to produce energy, maintain life, or stimulate growth.

Historically, people secured food through two methods: hunting and gathering, and agriculture. Today, most of the food energy consumed by the world population is supplied by the food industry.

A chocolate bar is a confection in bar form comprising some or all of the following components: cocoa solids, cocoa butter, sugar, milk. The relative presence or absence of these components form the subclasses of dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and white chocolate. In addition to these main ingredients, it may contain emulsifiers such as soy lecithin and flavors such as vanilla.

In most of the English-speaking world, chocolate bar also refers to what is typically called a candy bar in American English. This is a form of confectionery usually packaged in a bar or log form, often coated with chocolate, and sized as a snack for one person. But within that term, a wide variety of products exists, ranging from solid chocolate bars to multiple layerings or mixtures of ingredients such as nuts, fruit, caramel or fondant containing no chocolate.

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