Question:

How many cubic inches are in 6.2 liter engine?

Answer:

1 Liter = 61.02 cubic inches. So, a 6.2 liter engine is 378 cubic inches. AnswerParty again soon!

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Measurement

The cubic inch is a unit of measurement for volume in the Imperial units and United States customary units systems. It is the volume of a cube with each of its three dimensions (length, width, and depth) being one inch long.

The cubic inch and the cubic foot are still used as units of volume in the United States, although the common SI units of volume, the liter, milliliter, and cubic meter, are also used, especially in manufacturing and high technology.

Litre Multi-valve

Chevrolet El Camino was a coupe utility vehicle produced by the Chevrolet division of General Motors between 1959–60 and 1964-87. Introduced in the 1959–1960 model years in response to the success of the Ford Ranchero, its first run lasted only one year. Production resumed for the 1964–1977 model years based on the Chevelle platform, and continued for the 1978–1987 model years based on the GM G-body platform. Although based on corresponding Chevrolet car lines, the vehicle is classified and titled in North America as a truck. GMC's badge engineered El Camino variant, the Sprint, was introduced for the 1971 model year. Renamed Caballero in 1978, it was also produced through the 1987 model year.

In Spanish, El Camino means "the road".

A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment. A disaster can be ostensively defined as any tragic event stemming from events such as earthquakes, floods, catastrophic accidents, fires, or explosions. It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life and property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of people.

In contemporary academia, disasters are seen as the consequence of inappropriately managed risk. These risks are the product of a combination of both hazard/s and vulnerability. Hazards that strike in areas with low vulnerability will never become disasters, as is the case in uninhabited regions.

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