Question:

How many cubic centimeters are in one milliliter?

Answer:

There are 1000 cubic mililiters in 1 mililiter. 1 mililiter is then equal to 1000 cubic mililiters or 1 cubic centimeter! AnswerParty

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Cubic centimetre

A cubic centimetre (or cubic centimeter in US English) (SI unit symbol: cm3; non-SI abbreviations: cc and ccm) is a commonly used unit of volume that extends the derived SI-unit cubic metre, and corresponds to the volume of a cube that measures 1 cm × 1 cm × 1 cm. One cubic centimetre corresponds to a volume of 1⁄1,000,000 of a cubic metre, or 1⁄1,000 of a litre, or one millilitre; thus, 1 cm3 ≡ 1 ml. The mass of one cubic centimetre of water at 3.98 °C (the temperature at which it attains its maximum density) is closely equal to one gram. Note that SI supports only the use of symbols and deprecates the use of any abbreviations for units. Hence cm3 is preferred to cc or ccm.

Many scientific fields have replaced cubic centimeters with milliliters. The medical and automotive fields in the United States still use the term cubic centimetre. Much of the automotive industry outside the U.S. has switched to litres. The United Kingdom uses millilitres in preference to cubic centimetres in the medical field, but not the automotive. Most other English-speaking countries follow the UK example.

United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States. The U.S. customary system developed from English units which were in use in the British Empire before American independence. Consequently most U.S. units are virtually identical to the British imperial units. However, the British system was overhauled in 1824, changing the definitions of some units used there, so several differences exist between the two systems.

The majority of U.S. customary units were redefined in terms of the meter and the kilogram with the Mendenhall Order of 1893, and in practice, for many years before. These definitions were refined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959. The U.S. primarily uses customary units in its commercial activities, while science, medicine, government, and many sectors of industry use metric units. The SI metric system, or International System of Units is preferred for many uses by NIST


Imperial units

The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, but some Imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom and Canada.


Cubic crystal system

In crystallography, the cubic (or isometric) crystal system is a crystal system where the unit cell is in the shape of a cube. This is one of the most common and simplest shapes found in crystals and minerals.

There are three main varieties of these crystals:

Litre
Cubic inch

The cubic inch is a unit of measurement for volume in the Imperial units and United States customary units systems. It is the volume of a cube with each of its three dimensions (length, width, and depth) being one inch long.

The cubic inch and the cubic foot are still used as units of volume in the United States, although the common SI units of volume, the liter, milliliter, and cubic meter, are also used, especially in manufacturing and high technology.

1 E-6 m³ Measurement
Orders of magnitude

An order of magnitude is the magnitude, or scale, of a class of numbers such that the numbers in that class have a fixed ratio to the class preceding it.

In the most common usage of the term "order of magnitude," the fixed ratio is 10 and the scale is the base-10 exponent that is applied to 10. Therefore, to be an order of magnitude greater means to be 10 times as large.

The centimetre–gram–second system (abbreviated CGS or cgs) is a variant of the metric system of physical units based on centimetre as the unit of length, gram as a unit of mass, and second as a unit of time. All CGS mechanical units are unambiguously derived from these three base units, but there are several different ways of extending the CGS system to cover electromagnetism.

The CGS system has been largely supplanted by the MKS system, based on metre, kilogram, and second. MKS was in turn extended and replaced by the International System of Units (SI). The latter adopts the three base units of MKS, plus the ampere, mole, candela and kelvin. In many fields of science and engineering, SI is the only system of units in use. However, there remain certain subfields where CGS is prevalent. In the United States, the FPS system is still widely used.

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