Question:

How many 1/3s of a cup equal a full cup?

Answer:

When measuring, three 1/3 of a cup will equal a full cup. 1/3 times 3 = 1.

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World championships

A world championship(s) is a title commonly used to describe a variety of sports events across a number of sports and disciplines. As a general rule of thumb a world championships will be open to elite competitors from across the world, representing their nations, and winning such an event will be considered the highest or near highest achievement in the sport or contest, although there are exceptions to each of these elements in different sporting contexts.

The title is usually awarded through a combination of specific contests or, less commonly, ranking systems (e.g. the ICC Test Championship), or a combination of the two (e.g. World Triathlon Championship in Triathlon). This determines a 'world champion', who or which is commonly considered the best nation, team, individual (or other entity) in the world in a particular field, although the vaguaries of sport ensure that the competitor recognised at the best in an event is not always the 'world champion' (see Underdog).

Mathematics Measurement Abstraction

The cup and handle formation (also called the cup with handle formation) is a bullish chart pattern that is defined by a chart where a stock drops in value, then rises back up to the original value, then drops a small amount in value, and then rises a small amount in value. The "cup and handle" formation was discovered by William O'Neil, Founder of Investor's Business Daily, and explained in his top selling book, "How to Make Money in Stocks."

Brassiere measurement (also called brassiere size, bra size or bust size) refers to determining what size of bra a woman wears and mass-producing bras that will fit most women. Bra sizes usually consist of a number, indicating a band size around the woman's torso, and one or more letters indicating the breast cup size. Bra cup sizes were invented in 1932 and band sizes became popular in the 1940s.

Bra sizes vary from one manufacturer to another, and from country to country. Women's bodies and breasts may not conform to the sizes offered by companies. As a result, some women have a difficult time finding a properly fitted bra. Up to 80% of women wear the wrong size bra causing 40% to 60% to experience pain of one kind or another.]citation needed[

Brassieres
Graham's number

Graham's number, named after Ronald Graham, is a large number that is an upper bound on the solution to a certain problem in Ramsey theory.

The number gained a degree of popular attention when Martin Gardner described it in the "Mathematical Games" section of Scientific American in November 1977, writing that, "In an unpublished proof, Graham has recently established ... a bound so vast that it holds the record for the largest number ever used in a serious mathematical proof." The 1980 Guinness Book of World Records repeated Gardner's claim, adding to the popular interest in this number. According to physicist John Baez, Graham invented the quantity now known as Graham's number in conversation with Gardner himself. While Graham was trying to explain a result in Ramsey theory which he had derived with his collaborator B. L. Rothschild, Graham found that the quantity now known as Graham's number was easier to explain than the actual number appearing in the proof. Because the number which Graham described to Gardner is larger than the number in the paper itself, both are valid upper bounds for the solution to the Ramsey-theory problem studied by Graham and Rothschild.

Sports
Human Interest

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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