Question:

How long does it take to drive to Erie, PA from Niagara Falls, NY?

Answer:

From Niagra Falls, NY to Erie, PA is a distance of 116 miles which would take you about 2 hours 4 minutes passing through Buffalo.

More Info:

Erie

The geography of New York State varies widely. While the state is best known for New York City's urban atmosphere, especially Manhattan's skyscrapers, most of the state is dominated by farms, forests, rivers, mountains, and lakes. New York's Adirondack Park is larger than any U.S. National Park in the contiguous United States. Niagara Falls, on the Niagara River as it flows from Lake Erie to Lake Ontario, is a popular attraction. The Hudson River begins with Lake Tear of the Clouds and flows south through the eastern part of the state without draining lakes George or Champlain. Lake George empties at its north end into Lake Champlain, whose northern end extends into Canada, where it drains into the Richelieu River and then the St. Lawrence. Four of New York City's five boroughs are on the three islands at the mouth of the Hudson River: Manhattan Island, Staten Island, and Brooklyn and Queens on Long Island.

"Upstate" is a common term for New York counties north of suburban Westchester, Rockland and Dutchess counties. Upstate New York typically includes Lake George and Oneida Lake in the northeast; and rivers such as the Delaware, Genesee, Mohawk, and Susquehanna. The highest elevation in New York is Mount Marcy in the Adirondacks.

New York is a state in the Northeastern region of the United States. New York is the 27th-most extensive, the third-most populous, and the seventh-most densely populated of the 50 United States. New York is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south and by Connecticut, Massachusetts and Vermont to the east. The state has a maritime border with Rhode Island east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Ontario to the west and north, and Quebec to the north. The state of New York is often referred to as New York State, so as to distinguish it from New York City.

New York City, with a Census-estimated population of over 8.3 million in 2012, is the most populous city in the United States. Alone, it makes up over 40 percent of the population of New York State. It is known for its status as a center for finance and culture and for its status as the largest gateway for immigration to the United States. New York City attracts considerably more foreign visitors than any other US city. Both the state and city were named for the 17th century Duke of York, future King James II of England.

Transportation in the United States is facilitated by road, air, rail, and water networks(Boats). The vast majority of passenger travel occurs by automobile for shorter distances, and airplane or railroad for some people, for longer distances. In descending order, most cargoes travel by railroad, truck, pipeline, or boat; air shipping is typically used only for perishables and premium express shipments.

The Erie Canal is a canal in New York that originally ran about 363 miles (584 km) from Albany, New York, on the Hudson River to Buffalo, New York, at Lake Erie, at the time completing a navigable water route from New York City and the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. The canal contains 36 locks and encompasses a total elevation differential of approximately 565 ft. (169 m), and is widely regarded a chief cause that New York eclipsed Philadelphia as the largest city and port on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.

First proposed in 1807, it was under construction from 1817 to 1825 when it officially opened on October 26, 1825. In a time when bulk goods were limited to pack animals (an eighth-ton [250 pounds (113 kg)] maximum), and there were no steamships or railways, water was the most cost-effective way to ship bulk goods or significant tonnages of any kind going back to the earliest days of recorded history.

The Buffalo-Niagara Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area is a metropolitan area, designated by the United States Census Bureau, encompassing two counties – Erie and Niagara – in Western New York, with a population, as of the 2010 census, of 1,135,509 inhabitants. It is the second-largest metropolitan area in the state of New York, centering on the urbanized area of Buffalo.

As of the April 1, 2010, the metropolitan statistical area (MSA) had a population of 1,135,509; the combined statistical area (CSA), which adds Cattaraugus, had a population of 1,215,826 inhabitants. It is part of the Great Lakes Megalopolis, which contains an estimated 54 million people.

Niagara Falls (/nˈæɡrə/, Cayuga: Gahnawehtaˀ or Tgahnawęhtaˀ) is the collective name for three waterfalls that straddle the international border between Canada and the United States; more specifically, between the province of Ontario and the state of New York. They form the southern end of the Niagara Gorge.

From largest to smallest, the three waterfalls are the Horseshoe Falls, the American Falls and the Bridal Veil Falls. The Horseshoe Falls lie on the Canadian side and the American Falls on the American side, separated by Goat Island. The smaller Bridal Veil Falls are also located on the American side, separated from the other waterfalls by Luna Island. The international boundary line was originally drawn through Horseshoe Falls in 1819, but the boundary has long been in dispute due to natural erosion and construction.

The Erie Railroad (reporting mark ERIE) was a railroad that operated in the northeastern United States, originally connecting New York City with Lake Erie. Its mainline route proved influential in the development and economic growth of the Southern Tier, including cities such as Binghamton and Elmira, New York.

On October 17, 1960, the Erie merged with the former rival Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad to form the Erie Lackawanna Railroad. It became part of Conrail in 1976. In 1983, Erie remnants became part of New Jersey Transit rail operations, including its Main Line. Today, most of the former Erie Railroad routes are operated by Norfolk Southern Railway.

Buffalo /ˈbʌfəl/ is the second most populous city in the state of New York, after New York City. Located in Western New York on the eastern shores of Lake Erie and at the head of the Niagara River across from Fort Erie, Ontario, Canada, Buffalo is the seat of Erie County and the principal city of the Buffalo-Niagara Falls metropolitan area, the largest in Upstate New York. Buffalo itself has a population of 261,310 (2010 Census) and the Buffalo–Niagara–Cattaraugus Combined Statistical Area is home to 1,215,826 residents.

Originating around 1789 as a small trading community near the eponymous Buffalo Creek, Buffalo grew quickly after the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, with the city as its western terminus. By 1900, Buffalo was the 8th largest city in the United States, and went on to become a major railroad hub, and the largest grain-milling center in the country. The latter part of the 20th century saw a reversal of fortunes: Great Lakes shipping was rerouted by the opening of the St. Lawrence Seaway, and steel mills and other heavy industry relocated to places such as China. With the start of Amtrak in the 1970s, Buffalo Central Terminal was also abandoned, and trains were rerouted to nearby Depew, New York (Buffalo-Depew) and Exchange Street Station. By 1990 the city had fallen back below its 1900 population levels.

The highway system of Niagara County, New York, comprises 1,673.2 miles (2,692.8 km) of roads maintained by the New York State Department of Transportation, the county, and its towns and villages. 31 state-maintained highways enter the county, which account for a combined 267.0 miles (429.7 km) of the state highway mileage in New York. 21 of the highways are signed state routes; the other 10 are unsigned reference routes. The state roads are supplemented by 283.2 miles (455.8 km) of county-maintained highways, which carry unsigned county route designations. Niagara County is also served by three byways—the Seaway Trail, the Niagara Historic Trail, and the Niagara Wine Trail.

Niagara County is served by three nationally-assigned highways: I-190, an auxiliary Interstate Highway; US 62, a United States Numbered Highway; and US 62's business route through part of Niagara Falls. I-190 heads from Erie County to Niagara County by way of the North Grand Island Bridge over the Niagara River and immediately connects to NY 384, the Robert Moses State Parkway, and the LaSalle Expressway at a complex interchange on the north side of the bridge in Niagara Falls. The section of I-190 south of NY 384 is also designated as NY 324; however, that route is not signed north of Grand Island. Farther north, I-190 meets US 62 before leaving the city for the town of Lewiston. In Lewiston, the highway trends more to the northwest, crossing NY 31 and NY 104 on its way to the Lewiston-Queenston Bridge over the Niagara River. The bridge carries I-190 to the Canadian border, where it connects to Highway 405 in the province of Ontario.

NYS Route 265 marker

New York State Route 265 (NY 265) is a state highway located in the western part of New York in the United States. NY 265 is a north–south route that roughly parallels the western parts of the Niagara River in Erie County and Niagara County. For much of its southern course, it is more frequently referred to by its longtime name, Military Road.

Hospitality Recreation Pennsylvania Buffalo
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