Question:

How long does it take an Amtrak train to get from Battle Creek, MI to Kalamazoo, MI?

Answer:

For an Amtrak train to travel from Battle Creek, Michigan to Kalamazoo, Michigan it will take about 30 minutes and will be about $13.00 for one adult ticket.

More Info:

Amtrak Amtrak

Amtrak California logo 2012.svg

Amtrak California (reporting mark CDTX) is a brand name used by the Caltrans Division of Rail two state-supported Amtrak rail routes within the U.S. State of California, the Pacific Surfliner and the San Joaquin. It also includes an extensive network of Thruway Motorcoach bus connections, operated by private companies under contract. Although not part of the Amtrak California brand, Caltrans also provides support for the Capitol Corridor.

The Northeast Corridor (NEC) is a fully electrified railway line that serves the Northeast megalopolis of the United States. Owned primarily by Amtrak, it runs from Boston through New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore to Washington, D.C.

The corridor is used by a large number of Amtrak trains, including the high-speed Acela Express, intercity trains, and several long-distance trains. Most of the corridor also has frequent commuter rail service, operated by the MBTA, Shore Line East, Metro-North Railroad, New Jersey Transit, SEPTA and MARC. Additionally, freight service is operated over sections of the NEC by several companies.

The California Zephyr is a passenger train operated by Amtrak between Chicago, Illinois, and Emeryville, California, passing through the states of Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and California. At 2,438 miles (3,924 km) it is Amtrak's longest route and is also one of the most scenic, with views of the upper Colorado River valley in the Rocky Mountains, and the Sierra Nevada.

Prior to the formation of Amtrak, the California Zephyr (the CZ, or "Silver Lady") was a passenger train operated jointly by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (CB&Q), Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (D&RGW) and Western Pacific Railroad (WP). The CB&Q, D&RGW and WP christened "the most talked about train in America" on March 19, 1949, with the first departure the following day. It was purposefully scheduled so that the train passed through the most spectacular scenery on its route in the daylight. The original train ceased operations in 1970, with the D&RGW continuing to operate its own passenger train service, the Rio Grande Zephyr, between Salt Lake City and Denver using the original equipment until 1983. Since 1983 the California Zephyr name has been applied to the current Amtrak service, which operates daily and is a hybrid route between the route of the original Zephyr and that of its former rival, the City of San Francisco.

The 30th Street Station is the main railroad station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and one of the seven stations in SEPTA's Center City fare zone. It is also a major stop on Amtrak's Northeast and Keystone Corridors. At the end of fiscal year 2010, a total of 3,787,331 Amtrak passengers used 30th Street, making it the 3rd busiest Amtrak station in the system.

The station's address is 2955 Market Street, and is located across from the United States Post Office-Main Branch. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Adirondack is a passenger train operated daily by Amtrak between New York City and Montreal. The trip takes approximately 11 hours to cover a published distance of 381 miles (613 km), traveling through the scenic Hudson Valley and the Adirondack Mountains. The Adirondack operates as train 68 towards New York, and as 69 from New York to Montreal.

The Adirondack service is financed by the New York State Department of Transportation. The Adirondack service suffers from numerous delays along the route because almost none of the trackage is owned by Amtrak, and also because the route crosses an international boundary. The on-time performance of the route averaged 62.7% for the year ending February 2009. According to Amtrak, 47.4% of the train delay was due to track- and signal-related problems, especially along the Delaware & Hudson (CP Rail) segment.

These are the three-letter station codes used by Amtrak to indicate station locations. These are not the same as the IATA-indexed train stations or the three character IATA airport codes.

Note that this list is in order by code, there is also a list in alphabetical order by station name.

The Rhinecliff–Kingston Amtrak station, commonly and formerly known as simply Rhinecliff, is located in Rhinebeck, New York and serves northern Dutchess County and the nearby Kingston area across the Hudson River. The station has one low-level island platform that serves two tracks. There is also an unused second platform, connected to the first via an overpass.

Rhinecliff station is somewhat popular with owners of weekend homes in the area as well as some commuters who prefer Amtrak's service to that of Metro-North's out of Poughkeepsie. These riders, along with students and others going to and from nearby Bard College, made Rhinecliff the 46th-busiest Amtrak station in 2004 with 86,466 boardings. Occasional suggestions to bring Metro-North service to Rhinecliff have been stalled by community opposition and track ownership issues.

The Raleigh Amtrak Station, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, is served by three passenger trains, the Silver Star, Piedmont and Carolinian. The street address is 320 West Cabarrus Street, and is located just to the southwest of downtown Raleigh.

Southern Railway built the station in 1950 after leaving Union Station. The station was not used for passenger trains from 1964 to 1985, when a pending abandonment of track by CSX Transportation forced Amtrak to move there from the former Seaboard Air Line station north of downtown.

The Omaha Amtrak station is a train station in Omaha, Nebraska, United States served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system. It is served daily by the California Zephyr. The station was built by Amtrak in 1983 as a replacement for the former Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Station that was opened in 1898, and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1974.

Media related to Omaha (Amtrak station) at Wikimedia Commons

Battle Creek is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, in northwest Calhoun County, at the confluence of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Rivers. It is the principal city of the Battle Creek, Michigan Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which encompasses all of Calhoun county. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 52,347, while the MSA population was 136,146.

Battle Creek, known as the "Cereal City", is the world headquarters of Kellogg Company, founded by Will Keith Kellogg in 1906, whose brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, invented cold breakfast cereal as an alternative to the traditional meat-based breakfast. It is also the founding location of Post Cereals which is now Post Foods, as well as the location of a Ralston Foods cereal factory owned by Ralcorp.

Battle Creek is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, in northwest Calhoun County, at the confluence of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Rivers. It is the principal city of the Battle Creek, Michigan Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which encompasses all of Calhoun county. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 52,347, while the MSA population was 136,146.

Battle Creek, known as the "Cereal City", is the world headquarters of Kellogg Company, founded by Will Keith Kellogg in 1906, whose brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, invented cold breakfast cereal as an alternative to the traditional meat-based breakfast. It is also the founding location of Post Cereals which is now Post Foods, as well as the location of a Ralston Foods cereal factory owned by Ralcorp.

W. K. Kellogg Airport (IATA: BTL, ICAO: KBTL, FAA LID: BTL) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Battle Creek, a city in Calhoun County, Michigan, United States. The airport is accessible by road from Helmer Road, and is located near I-94. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. It is also known as W. K. Kellogg Regional Airport.

It addition to general aviation, the airport supports air cargo and corporate flight operations. It is home to Western Michigan University College of Aviation, Duncan Aviation – the nation’s largest family-owned aircraft refurbishing company, WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation, Federal Express regional truck distribution facility, and other aviation businesses. The Battle Creek Field of Flight Air Show and Balloon Festival is also held annually at Kellogg Airport. The airfield is co-located with the Kellogg Air National Guard Base, home of the 110th Airlift Wing (110 AW), a unit of the Michigan Air National Guard operationally gained by the Air Mobility Command (AMC).

The Michigan Central Railroad Depot (listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Penn Central Railway Station) opened on July 27, 1888, in Battle Creek, MI. Rogers and MacFarlane of Detroit designed the depot, one of several Richardsonian Romanesque-style stations between Detroit and Chicago in the late nineteenth century. Thomas Edison as well as Presidents William Howard Taft and Gerald Ford visited here. The depot was acquired by the New York Central Railroad in 1918, Penn Central in 1968 and Amtrak in 1970. The depot was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

Masonry of Lake Superior red sandstone, noted for its distinctive patterns, provides one of the most striking aspects of the Depot’s exterior. Another prominent feature of the Depot is its clock tower.

The Battle Creek Sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, United States, was a health resort based on the health principles advocated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, most notably associated with John Harvey Kellogg. The complex was purchased by the U.S. Army during World War II and converted into the Percy Jones Army Hospital. The facility later became the Hart-Dole-Inouye Federal Center.

It first opened on September 5, 1866, as the Western Health Reform Institute. In 1876, John Harvey Kellogg became the superintendent, and his brother, W. K. Kellogg, worked as the bookkeeper. In 1878, a new structure was built on the site, but it burned down in 1902. The following year, it was rebuilt, enlarged and renamed The Battle Creek Sanitarium. As Kellogg put it, they took the word "sanatorium", which back then was defined as an English term designating a health resort for invalid soldiers. "A change of two letters transformed 'sanatorium' to 'sanitarium', and a new word was added to the English language". Kellogg states the number of patients grew from 106 in 1866, to 7,006 patrons during the year 1906. "The San" and Kellogg were lampooned in T. Coraghessan Boyle's 1993 novel The Road to Wellville, and the 1994 film adaptation.

Divisions

John Harvey Kellogg (February 26, 1852 – December 14, 1943) was an American medical doctor in Battle Creek, Michigan, who ran a sanitarium using holistic methods, with a particular focus on nutrition, enemas and exercise. Kellogg was an advocate of vegetarianism and is best known for the invention of the corn flakes breakfast cereal with his brother, Will Keith Kellogg. He led in the establishment of the American Medical Missionary College. The College, founded in 1895, operated until 1910 when it merged with Illinois State University.

The Kellogg Company (informally Kellogg's or Kellogg) is a multinational food manufacturing company headquartered in Battle Creek, Michigan, United States. Kellogg's produces cereal and convenience foods, including cookies, crackers, toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks, frozen waffles, and vegetarian foods. The company's brands include Corn Flakes, Frosted Flakes, Rice Krispies, Special K, Cocoa Krispies, Keebler, Pringles, Pop-Tarts, Kashi, Cheez-It, Eggo, Nutri-Grain and many more. Kellogg's stated purpose is "Nourishing families so they can flourish and thrive."

Kellogg's products are manufactured in 35 countries and marketed in over 180 countries. Kellogg's largest factory is at Trafford Park in Manchester, United Kingdom, which is also the location of its European headquarters. Kellogg's holds a Royal Warrant from Queen Elizabeth II and the Prince of Wales.

Battle Creek is a train station in Battle Creek, Michigan, served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system. The station serves as the split between the Blue Water and Wolverine lines.

The Battle Creek Amtrak Station was built as a replacement for two other old train stations, the Grand Trunk Railroad Battle Creek Station and the Michigan Central Battle Creek station (a.k.a. Penn Central Railway Station). The Michigan Central Railroad depot has been on the National Register of Historic Places since April 16, 1971, while the Grand Trunk Depot has been on the NRHP since 1980.

Calhoun County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. The county seat is Marshall. As of the 2010 census, the population was 136,146. The entire county is co-terminous with the Battle Creek Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Calhoun County was established on October 19, 1829 and named after John C. Calhoun, who was at the time Vice President under Andrew Jackson, making it one of Michigan's Cabinet counties. County government was first organized March 6, 1833.

The Kellogg Arena is a 9,800-seat multi-purpose arena in Battle Creek, Michigan. It was built in 1980. It seats 4,675 for basketball games, 4,859 for ice shows, 4,433, for the circus, 1,500 for theatrical shows and concerts, 6,200 for end-stage concerts and 6,500 for center-stage concerts.

The arena, with a ceiling height of 35 feet to low steel and 47' high steel, is also a convention center, with 30,360 square feet (2,821 m2) of total space, with 22,000 square feet (2,000 m2) on the arena floor. There is a hospitality room holding up to 65 people and there are five dressing rooms and seven concession stands as well as a production office.

Interstate 94 marker

There are currently eight business routes of Interstate 94 (I-94) in the US state of Michigan. These business routes connect I-94 to the downtown business districts of neighboring cities. These eight routes are all business loops which bear the Business Loop I-94 (BL I-94) designation.

Kalamazoo

Kalamazoo /ˌkæləməˈz/ is a city in the southwest region of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is the county seat of Kalamazoo County. Kalamazoo is located geographically in Western and Southern Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 74,262. It is the major city of the Kalamazoo-Portage Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 326,589 as of 2010.

Kalamazoo is home to Western Michigan University, a large public university, and Kalamazoo College, a liberal arts school. Kalamazoo is home to major players in the pharmaceutical and medical science industries. Kalamazoo is also known for its importance in the world of music as it was the original home to Gibson guitars. Kalamazoo has also built a reputation a major player in the American craft beer movement.

The Kalamazoo Transportation Center is an intermodal complex in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan. Amtrak and Greyhound provide regular service there. The center is also the major downtown transfer hub for Kalamazoo's Metro Transit bus system.

Amtrak does not allow passengers to check luggage at Kalamazoo, but does permit carry-on of up to two suitcases plus "personal items" such as briefcases, purses, laptop bags, and infant gear.

Kalamazoo County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the population was 250,331. The county seat is Kalamazoo. It is part of the Kalamazoo-Portage Metropolitan Area.

Richland Township is a civil township of Kalamazoo County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 7,501 at the 2010 census.

The village of Richland is located within the township. Ricahland Township was organized in 1832.

Schoolcraft Township is a civil township of Kalamazoo County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 7,260 at the 2000 census. The township is named for Henry Schoolcraft, noted for conducting many early land surveys throughout Michigan.

Brady Township is a civil township of Kalamazoo County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the township population was 4,263.

St. Augustine Cathedral is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and the seat of the Bishop of the Diocese of Kalamazoo.

The local residents constructed a church in 1852 as a mission used by traveling priests. Detroit bishop Peter Paul Lefevère established the parish of St. Augustine and appointed a permanent pastor in a letter from dated January 22, 1856. However, by 1869, the structure was no longer safe and inadequate for the growing congregation. It was replaced by a new church on the same site.

The Masonic Temple in Kalamazoo, Michigan is a building from 1913. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. No lodges currently meet in the building.


The John Gibbs House was built in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1853. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. It serves as an avenue towards environmental stewardship and sustainability that is rarely accessed in formal education or community engagement.

The Gibbs House is located on the south side of Parkview Avenue next to Western Michigan University's Business Technology and Research Park in Kalamazoo, Michigan. It was purchased from the United States federal government by John Gibbs, a craftsman from New York. Gibbs constructed the Italianate house which still stands on the property. The Gibbs family originated in England and descends from some of the American settlers from the country. The farm and house were transferred to the university in 1959. In 1991 the development of WMU's Business Technology and Research Park was approved, which now encompasses the majority of the property. The Gibbs House is currently used for environmental research purposes by university students.

Waldo Stadium is a stadium in Kalamazoo, Michigan. It is primarily used for football, and is the home field of the Western Michigan University Broncos. Opened in 1939, it now has a capacity of 30,200 spectators.

Amtrak Amtrak

Amtrak California logo 2012.svg

Amtrak California (reporting mark CDTX) is a brand name used by the Caltrans Division of Rail two state-supported Amtrak rail routes within the U.S. State of California, the Pacific Surfliner and the San Joaquin. It also includes an extensive network of Thruway Motorcoach bus connections, operated by private companies under contract. Although not part of the Amtrak California brand, Caltrans also provides support for the Capitol Corridor.

The Northeast Corridor (NEC) is a fully electrified railway line that serves the Northeast megalopolis of the United States. Owned primarily by Amtrak, it runs from Boston through New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore to Washington, D.C.

The corridor is used by a large number of Amtrak trains, including the high-speed Acela Express, intercity trains, and several long-distance trains. Most of the corridor also has frequent commuter rail service, operated by the MBTA, Shore Line East, Metro-North Railroad, New Jersey Transit, SEPTA and MARC. Additionally, freight service is operated over sections of the NEC by several companies.

The California Zephyr is a passenger train operated by Amtrak between Chicago, Illinois, and Emeryville, California, passing through the states of Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, and California. At 2,438 miles (3,924 km) it is Amtrak's longest route and is also one of the most scenic, with views of the upper Colorado River valley in the Rocky Mountains, and the Sierra Nevada.

Prior to the formation of Amtrak, the California Zephyr (the CZ, or "Silver Lady") was a passenger train operated jointly by the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad (CB&Q), Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad (D&RGW) and Western Pacific Railroad (WP). The CB&Q, D&RGW and WP christened "the most talked about train in America" on March 19, 1949, with the first departure the following day. It was purposefully scheduled so that the train passed through the most spectacular scenery on its route in the daylight. The original train ceased operations in 1970, with the D&RGW continuing to operate its own passenger train service, the Rio Grande Zephyr, between Salt Lake City and Denver using the original equipment until 1983. Since 1983 the California Zephyr name has been applied to the current Amtrak service, which operates daily and is a hybrid route between the route of the original Zephyr and that of its former rival, the City of San Francisco.

The 30th Street Station is the main railroad station in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and one of the seven stations in SEPTA's Center City fare zone. It is also a major stop on Amtrak's Northeast and Keystone Corridors. At the end of fiscal year 2010, a total of 3,787,331 Amtrak passengers used 30th Street, making it the 3rd busiest Amtrak station in the system.

The station's address is 2955 Market Street, and is located across from the United States Post Office-Main Branch. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The Adirondack is a passenger train operated daily by Amtrak between New York City and Montreal. The trip takes approximately 11 hours to cover a published distance of 381 miles (613 km), traveling through the scenic Hudson Valley and the Adirondack Mountains. The Adirondack operates as train 68 towards New York, and as 69 from New York to Montreal.

The Adirondack service is financed by the New York State Department of Transportation. The Adirondack service suffers from numerous delays along the route because almost none of the trackage is owned by Amtrak, and also because the route crosses an international boundary. The on-time performance of the route averaged 62.7% for the year ending February 2009. According to Amtrak, 47.4% of the train delay was due to track- and signal-related problems, especially along the Delaware & Hudson (CP Rail) segment.

These are the three-letter station codes used by Amtrak to indicate station locations. These are not the same as the IATA-indexed train stations or the three character IATA airport codes.

Note that this list is in order by code, there is also a list in alphabetical order by station name.

The Rhinecliff–Kingston Amtrak station, commonly and formerly known as simply Rhinecliff, is located in Rhinebeck, New York and serves northern Dutchess County and the nearby Kingston area across the Hudson River. The station has one low-level island platform that serves two tracks. There is also an unused second platform, connected to the first via an overpass.

Rhinecliff station is somewhat popular with owners of weekend homes in the area as well as some commuters who prefer Amtrak's service to that of Metro-North's out of Poughkeepsie. These riders, along with students and others going to and from nearby Bard College, made Rhinecliff the 46th-busiest Amtrak station in 2004 with 86,466 boardings. Occasional suggestions to bring Metro-North service to Rhinecliff have been stalled by community opposition and track ownership issues.

The Raleigh Amtrak Station, located in Raleigh, North Carolina, is served by three passenger trains, the Silver Star, Piedmont and Carolinian. The street address is 320 West Cabarrus Street, and is located just to the southwest of downtown Raleigh.

Southern Railway built the station in 1950 after leaving Union Station. The station was not used for passenger trains from 1964 to 1985, when a pending abandonment of track by CSX Transportation forced Amtrak to move there from the former Seaboard Air Line station north of downtown.

The Omaha Amtrak station is a train station in Omaha, Nebraska, United States served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system. It is served daily by the California Zephyr. The station was built by Amtrak in 1983 as a replacement for the former Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Station that was opened in 1898, and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1974.

Media related to Omaha (Amtrak station) at Wikimedia Commons

Battle Creek is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, in northwest Calhoun County, at the confluence of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Rivers. It is the principal city of the Battle Creek, Michigan Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which encompasses all of Calhoun county. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 52,347, while the MSA population was 136,146.

Battle Creek, known as the "Cereal City", is the world headquarters of Kellogg Company, founded by Will Keith Kellogg in 1906, whose brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, invented cold breakfast cereal as an alternative to the traditional meat-based breakfast. It is also the founding location of Post Cereals which is now Post Foods, as well as the location of a Ralston Foods cereal factory owned by Ralcorp.

Battle Creek is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan, in northwest Calhoun County, at the confluence of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Rivers. It is the principal city of the Battle Creek, Michigan Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which encompasses all of Calhoun county. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 52,347, while the MSA population was 136,146.

Battle Creek, known as the "Cereal City", is the world headquarters of Kellogg Company, founded by Will Keith Kellogg in 1906, whose brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, invented cold breakfast cereal as an alternative to the traditional meat-based breakfast. It is also the founding location of Post Cereals which is now Post Foods, as well as the location of a Ralston Foods cereal factory owned by Ralcorp.

W. K. Kellogg Airport (IATA: BTL, ICAO: KBTL, FAA LID: BTL) is a city owned, public use airport located three nautical miles (6 km) west of the central business district of Battle Creek, a city in Calhoun County, Michigan, United States. The airport is accessible by road from Helmer Road, and is located near I-94. It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. It is also known as W. K. Kellogg Regional Airport.

It addition to general aviation, the airport supports air cargo and corporate flight operations. It is home to Western Michigan University College of Aviation, Duncan Aviation – the nation’s largest family-owned aircraft refurbishing company, WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation, Federal Express regional truck distribution facility, and other aviation businesses. The Battle Creek Field of Flight Air Show and Balloon Festival is also held annually at Kellogg Airport. The airfield is co-located with the Kellogg Air National Guard Base, home of the 110th Airlift Wing (110 AW), a unit of the Michigan Air National Guard operationally gained by the Air Mobility Command (AMC).

The Michigan Central Railroad Depot (listed in the National Register of Historic Places as the Penn Central Railway Station) opened on July 27, 1888, in Battle Creek, MI. Rogers and MacFarlane of Detroit designed the depot, one of several Richardsonian Romanesque-style stations between Detroit and Chicago in the late nineteenth century. Thomas Edison as well as Presidents William Howard Taft and Gerald Ford visited here. The depot was acquired by the New York Central Railroad in 1918, Penn Central in 1968 and Amtrak in 1970. The depot was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.

Masonry of Lake Superior red sandstone, noted for its distinctive patterns, provides one of the most striking aspects of the Depot’s exterior. Another prominent feature of the Depot is its clock tower.

The Battle Creek Sanitarium in Battle Creek, Michigan, United States, was a health resort based on the health principles advocated by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, most notably associated with John Harvey Kellogg. The complex was purchased by the U.S. Army during World War II and converted into the Percy Jones Army Hospital. The facility later became the Hart-Dole-Inouye Federal Center.

It first opened on September 5, 1866, as the Western Health Reform Institute. In 1876, John Harvey Kellogg became the superintendent, and his brother, W. K. Kellogg, worked as the bookkeeper. In 1878, a new structure was built on the site, but it burned down in 1902. The following year, it was rebuilt, enlarged and renamed The Battle Creek Sanitarium. As Kellogg put it, they took the word "sanatorium", which back then was defined as an English term designating a health resort for invalid soldiers. "A change of two letters transformed 'sanatorium' to 'sanitarium', and a new word was added to the English language". Kellogg states the number of patients grew from 106 in 1866, to 7,006 patrons during the year 1906. "The San" and Kellogg were lampooned in T. Coraghessan Boyle's 1993 novel The Road to Wellville, and the 1994 film adaptation.

Divisions

John Harvey Kellogg (February 26, 1852 – December 14, 1943) was an American medical doctor in Battle Creek, Michigan, who ran a sanitarium using holistic methods, with a particular focus on nutrition, enemas and exercise. Kellogg was an advocate of vegetarianism and is best known for the invention of the corn flakes breakfast cereal with his brother, Will Keith Kellogg. He led in the establishment of the American Medical Missionary College. The College, founded in 1895, operated until 1910 when it merged with Illinois State University.

The Kellogg Company (informally Kellogg's or Kellogg) is a multinational food manufacturing company headquartered in Battle Creek, Michigan, United States. Kellogg's produces cereal and convenience foods, including cookies, crackers, toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit-flavored snacks, frozen waffles, and vegetarian foods. The company's brands include Corn Flakes, Frosted Flakes, Rice Krispies, Special K, Cocoa Krispies, Keebler, Pringles, Pop-Tarts, Kashi, Cheez-It, Eggo, Nutri-Grain and many more. Kellogg's stated purpose is "Nourishing families so they can flourish and thrive."

Kellogg's products are manufactured in 35 countries and marketed in over 180 countries. Kellogg's largest factory is at Trafford Park in Manchester, United Kingdom, which is also the location of its European headquarters. Kellogg's holds a Royal Warrant from Queen Elizabeth II and the Prince of Wales.

Battle Creek is a train station in Battle Creek, Michigan, served by Amtrak, the national railroad passenger system. The station serves as the split between the Blue Water and Wolverine lines.

The Battle Creek Amtrak Station was built as a replacement for two other old train stations, the Grand Trunk Railroad Battle Creek Station and the Michigan Central Battle Creek station (a.k.a. Penn Central Railway Station). The Michigan Central Railroad depot has been on the National Register of Historic Places since April 16, 1971, while the Grand Trunk Depot has been on the NRHP since 1980.

Calhoun County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. The county seat is Marshall. As of the 2010 census, the population was 136,146. The entire county is co-terminous with the Battle Creek Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Calhoun County was established on October 19, 1829 and named after John C. Calhoun, who was at the time Vice President under Andrew Jackson, making it one of Michigan's Cabinet counties. County government was first organized March 6, 1833.

The Kellogg Arena is a 9,800-seat multi-purpose arena in Battle Creek, Michigan. It was built in 1980. It seats 4,675 for basketball games, 4,859 for ice shows, 4,433, for the circus, 1,500 for theatrical shows and concerts, 6,200 for end-stage concerts and 6,500 for center-stage concerts.

The arena, with a ceiling height of 35 feet to low steel and 47' high steel, is also a convention center, with 30,360 square feet (2,821 m2) of total space, with 22,000 square feet (2,000 m2) on the arena floor. There is a hospitality room holding up to 65 people and there are five dressing rooms and seven concession stands as well as a production office.

Interstate 94 marker

There are currently eight business routes of Interstate 94 (I-94) in the US state of Michigan. These business routes connect I-94 to the downtown business districts of neighboring cities. These eight routes are all business loops which bear the Business Loop I-94 (BL I-94) designation.

Michigan Michigan

The University of Michigan (UM, U-M, UMich, or U of M), frequently referred to as simply Michigan, is a public research university located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. It is the state's oldest university and has two satellite campuses located in Flint and Dearborn. The university was founded in 1817 in Detroit as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, about 20 years before the Michigan Territory officially became a state. What would become the university moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 31 million gross square feet (712 acres or 2.38 km²), and has transformed its academic program from a strictly classical curriculum to one that includes science and research.

The university has very high research activity and its comprehensive graduate program offers doctoral degrees in the humanities, social sciences, and STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) as well as professional degrees in medicine, law, social work and dentistry. Michigan was one of the founding members of the Association of American Universities, and its body of living alumni (as of 2012) comprises more than 500,000.

Maize and Blue

The Michigan Wolverines football program represents the University of Michigan in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) level. Michigan has the most all-time wins and the highest winning percentage in college football history. The team is known for its distinctive winged helmet, its fight song, its record-breaking attendance figures at Michigan Stadium, and its many rivalries, particularly its annual season-ending game against Ohio State, once voted as ESPN's best sports rivalry.

         

The Michigan Wolverines comprise 27 varsity sports teams at the University of Michigan. These teams compete in the NCAA's Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except women's water polo, which competes in the NCAA inter-divisional Collegiate Water Polo Association, and men's lacrosse which competes in the NCAA D1 Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference Lacrosse League. Team colors are maize and blue—which are different shades of "maize" and "blue" than the university at large. The winged helmet is a recognized icon of Michigan Athletics.

Maize and Blue

1921, 1926, 1927, 1929, 1948, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1974, 1977, 1985, 1986, 2012

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. The other four Great Lakes are shared by the U.S. and Canada. It is the second largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third largest by surface area, after Lake Superior and Lake Huron (and is slightly smaller than the U.S. state of West Virginia). To the east, its basin is conjoined with that of Lake Huron through the wide Straits of Mackinac, giving it the same surface elevation as its easterly counterpart; the two are technically a single lake. Lake Michigan is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. The word "Michigan" originally referred to the lake itself, and is believed to come from the Ojibwa word mishigami meaning "great water".

Green & white

Michigan State University (MSU) is a public research university located in East Lansing, Michigan, United States and is the first land-grant institution that was created to serve as a model for future land-grant colleges in the country under the 1862 Morrill Act.

             

The Michigan Wolverines men's ice hockey team is the college ice hockey team that represents the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Earning varsity status in 1922, the program has completed its 91st season. Until the 2012-13 season, the school's team competed in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association, although it competed in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association between 1959 and 1981. Beginning in the 2013-14 season, the Wolverines will compete in the new Big Ten conference. From 1991-2012, the team played in 22 consecutive NCAA Men's Division I Ice Hockey Tournaments; this is an NCAA record. The Wolverines have won an NCAA-record nine Division I NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championships, seven of which came during a 17-year stretch between 1948 and 1964. Two more championships were won under current head coach Red Berenson in 1996 and 1998.

Detroit

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
Quicken Loans 400
Pure Michigan 400

NASCAR Nationwide Series
Alliance Truck Parts 250
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series
VFW 200

Kalamazoo

Kalamazoo /ˌkæləməˈz/ is a city in the southwest region of the U.S. state of Michigan. It is the county seat of Kalamazoo County. Kalamazoo is located geographically in Western and Southern Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city had a total population of 74,262. It is the major city of the Kalamazoo-Portage Metropolitan Statistical Area, which has a population of 326,589 as of 2010.

Kalamazoo is home to Western Michigan University, a large public university, and Kalamazoo College, a liberal arts school. Kalamazoo is home to major players in the pharmaceutical and medical science industries. Kalamazoo is also known for its importance in the world of music as it was the original home to Gibson guitars. Kalamazoo has also built a reputation a major player in the American craft beer movement.

The Kalamazoo Transportation Center is an intermodal complex in downtown Kalamazoo, Michigan. Amtrak and Greyhound provide regular service there. The center is also the major downtown transfer hub for Kalamazoo's Metro Transit bus system.

Amtrak does not allow passengers to check luggage at Kalamazoo, but does permit carry-on of up to two suitcases plus "personal items" such as briefcases, purses, laptop bags, and infant gear.

Kalamazoo County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the population was 250,331. The county seat is Kalamazoo. It is part of the Kalamazoo-Portage Metropolitan Area.

Richland Township is a civil township of Kalamazoo County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 7,501 at the 2010 census.

The village of Richland is located within the township. Ricahland Township was organized in 1832.

Schoolcraft Township is a civil township of Kalamazoo County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 7,260 at the 2000 census. The township is named for Henry Schoolcraft, noted for conducting many early land surveys throughout Michigan.

Brady Township is a civil township of Kalamazoo County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the township population was 4,263.

St. Augustine Cathedral is the cathedral of the Roman Catholic Church in Kalamazoo, Michigan, and the seat of the Bishop of the Diocese of Kalamazoo.

The local residents constructed a church in 1852 as a mission used by traveling priests. Detroit bishop Peter Paul Lefevère established the parish of St. Augustine and appointed a permanent pastor in a letter from dated January 22, 1856. However, by 1869, the structure was no longer safe and inadequate for the growing congregation. It was replaced by a new church on the same site.

The Masonic Temple in Kalamazoo, Michigan is a building from 1913. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. No lodges currently meet in the building.


The John Gibbs House was built in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1853. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. It serves as an avenue towards environmental stewardship and sustainability that is rarely accessed in formal education or community engagement.

The Gibbs House is located on the south side of Parkview Avenue next to Western Michigan University's Business Technology and Research Park in Kalamazoo, Michigan. It was purchased from the United States federal government by John Gibbs, a craftsman from New York. Gibbs constructed the Italianate house which still stands on the property. The Gibbs family originated in England and descends from some of the American settlers from the country. The farm and house were transferred to the university in 1959. In 1991 the development of WMU's Business Technology and Research Park was approved, which now encompasses the majority of the property. The Gibbs House is currently used for environmental research purposes by university students.

Waldo Stadium is a stadium in Kalamazoo, Michigan. It is primarily used for football, and is the home field of the Western Michigan University Broncos. Opened in 1939, it now has a capacity of 30,200 spectators.

Michigan Michigan

The University of Michigan (UM, U-M, UMich, or U of M), frequently referred to as simply Michigan, is a public research university located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States. It is the state's oldest university and has two satellite campuses located in Flint and Dearborn. The university was founded in 1817 in Detroit as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, about 20 years before the Michigan Territory officially became a state. What would become the university moved to Ann Arbor in 1837 onto 40 acres (16 ha) of what is now known as Central Campus. Since its establishment in Ann Arbor, the university campus has expanded to include more than 584 major buildings with a combined area of more than 31 million gross square feet (712 acres or 2.38 km²), and has transformed its academic program from a strictly classical curriculum to one that includes science and research.

The university has very high research activity and its comprehensive graduate program offers doctoral degrees in the humanities, social sciences, and STEM fields (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) as well as professional degrees in medicine, law, social work and dentistry. Michigan was one of the founding members of the Association of American Universities, and its body of living alumni (as of 2012) comprises more than 500,000.

Maize and Blue

The Michigan Wolverines football program represents the University of Michigan in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) level. Michigan has the most all-time wins and the highest winning percentage in college football history. The team is known for its distinctive winged helmet, its fight song, its record-breaking attendance figures at Michigan Stadium, and its many rivalries, particularly its annual season-ending game against Ohio State, once voted as ESPN's best sports rivalry.

         

The Michigan Wolverines comprise 27 varsity sports teams at the University of Michigan. These teams compete in the NCAA's Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except women's water polo, which competes in the NCAA inter-divisional Collegiate Water Polo Association, and men's lacrosse which competes in the NCAA D1 Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference Lacrosse League. Team colors are maize and blue—which are different shades of "maize" and "blue" than the university at large. The winged helmet is a recognized icon of Michigan Athletics.

Maize and Blue

1921, 1926, 1927, 1929, 1948, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1974, 1977, 1985, 1986, 2012

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. The other four Great Lakes are shared by the U.S. and Canada. It is the second largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third largest by surface area, after Lake Superior and Lake Huron (and is slightly smaller than the U.S. state of West Virginia). To the east, its basin is conjoined with that of Lake Huron through the wide Straits of Mackinac, giving it the same surface elevation as its easterly counterpart; the two are technically a single lake. Lake Michigan is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. The word "Michigan" originally referred to the lake itself, and is believed to come from the Ojibwa word mishigami meaning "great water".

Green & white

Michigan State University (MSU) is a public research university located in East Lansing, Michigan, United States and is the first land-grant institution that was created to serve as a model for future land-grant colleges in the country under the 1862 Morrill Act.

             

The Michigan Wolverines men's ice hockey team is the college ice hockey team that represents the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Earning varsity status in 1922, the program has completed its 91st season. Until the 2012-13 season, the school's team competed in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association, although it competed in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association between 1959 and 1981. Beginning in the 2013-14 season, the Wolverines will compete in the new Big Ten conference. From 1991-2012, the team played in 22 consecutive NCAA Men's Division I Ice Hockey Tournaments; this is an NCAA record. The Wolverines have won an NCAA-record nine Division I NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championships, seven of which came during a 17-year stretch between 1948 and 1964. Two more championships were won under current head coach Red Berenson in 1996 and 1998.

Detroit

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
Quicken Loans 400
Pure Michigan 400

NASCAR Nationwide Series
Alliance Truck Parts 250
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series
VFW 200

Primary rail transportation in the United States today consists of freight shipments. Passenger service, once a large and vital part of the nation's passenger transportation network, now plays a limited role as compared to transportation patterns in many other countries.

The U.S. rail industry has experienced repeated convulsions due to changing economic needs and the rise of automobile, bus, and air transport. Freight railroads play an important role in U.S. economy, especially for moving imports and exports using containers, and for shipments of coal and oil. According to the British news magazine The Economist, "They are universally recognised in the industry as the best in the world." Productivity rose 172% between 1981 and 2000, while rates rose 55% (after accounting for inflation). Rail's share of the American freight market rose to 43%, the highest for any rich country.

Transportation in the United States

West Michigan and Western Michigan are terms for an arbitrarily selected region in the U.S. state of Michigan in its Lower Peninsula. There is no official definition for what constitutes "West Michigan." The area of West Michigan may also include parts of Southern Michigan.

Michigan Services are three Amtrak passenger rail routes connecting Chicago, Illinois with the Michigan cities of Grand Rapids, Port Huron, and Detroit, and stations en route. The group is a component of the Midwest Regional Rail Initiative.

The Michigan Services routes are:

The Vine Neighborhood is a neighborhood in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Its boundaries are West Lovell Street to the north, Oakland Drive to the west, Crosstown Parkway to the south, and South Burdick Street to the east.

One of the oldest neighborhoods in Kalamazoo, the Vine has houses dating to the 1840s. During the early 1900s, businesses in the Vine flourished, including a variety of grocery and retail space. During the Great Depression, many houses built for single families were split into multiple residences. In the 1970s, the neighborhood became a destination for students attending nearby Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo College and Kalamazoo Valley Community College at the downtown campus.

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