Question:

How long do the 9 Supreme Court Justices serve on the high court?

Answer:

The Constitution provides that justices 'shall hold their offices during good behavior' (unless appointed during a Senate recess). The term 'good behavior' is well understood to mean justices may serve for the remainder of their lives, although they can voluntarily resign or retire.

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A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of many legal jurisdictions. Other descriptions for such courts include court of last resort, instance court, judgment court, apex court, and highest court of appeal. Broadly speaking, the decisions of a supreme court are not subject to further review by any other court.

In a few places, the court named the "Supreme Court" is not in fact the highest court; examples include the Supreme Court of the State of New York and the former Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales. The highest court in some jurisdictions is not named the "Supreme Court", for example, the High Court of Australia; this is because decisions by the High Court could be appealed to the Privy Council.

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The Supreme Court of the United States (first abbreviated as Scotus in 1879) was established pursuant to Article III of the United States Constitution in 1789 as the highest federal court in the United States. It has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and over state court cases involving issues of federal law, plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is the final interpreter of federal constitutional law, although it may only act within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction.

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The appointment and confirmation of Justices to the Supreme Court of the United States involves several steps set forth by the United States Constitution, which have been further refined and developed by decades of tradition. Justices are appointed by the President of the United States, and must be confirmed by the United States Senate. Modernly, this is done following a series of hearings in which both the nominee and other witnesses make statements and answer questions before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Article Two of the United States Constitution places the power of appointing Justices with the President of the United States, stating:

The Supreme Court of Pakistan (SCOP) (Urdu: عدالت عظمیٰ پاکستان; Adālat-e-Uzma Pākistān) is the apex court in the judicial hierarchy of Pakistan, the final arbiter of legal and constitutional disputes. The Supreme Court has a permanent seat in Islamabad. It also has a number of Branch Registries where cases are heard. The court has a number of de jure powers, outlined in the Constitution. Through several periods of military rule and constitutional suspensions (see Doctrine of necessity), the court has also established itself as a de facto check on military power.

It has the appellate jurisdiction over all high courts (including provincial high courts, district courts, and special courts) and federal courts, as well as original jurisdiction over a few types of cases. The Supreme Court is made up of a chief justice and a number of senior justices who are nominated by the President after consulting the Prime minister. Once appointed justices are expected to complete a designated term and then retire, unless they are removed by the Supreme Judicial Council after receiving a presidential reference regarding misconduct of judge(s).

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