Question:

How is Illinois pronounced?

Answer:

Illinois, an Algonquian meaning one who sounds normal, is pronounced either "ill in noy" or "il-uh-noi -noiz". AnswerParty Away!

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Illinois

Achumawi, Adai, Afro-Seminole Creole, Ahtna, Alabama, Aleut, Alutiiq, Arapaho, Assiniboine, Atakapa, Atsugewi, Barbareño, Biloxi, Blackfoot, Caddo, Cahuilla, Carolina Algonquian, Carolinian, Cayuga, Cayuse, Central Kalapuya, Central Siberian Yupik, Central Pomo, Chamorro, Chemakum, Cheyenne, Chickasaw, Chico, Chimariko, Chinook Jargon, Chippewa, Chitimacha, Chiwere, Choctaw, Coast Tsimshian, Coahuilteco, Coeur d'Alene, Colorado River, Columbia-Moses, Cocopah, Comanche, Cowlitz, Creek, Crow, Deg Xinag, Dena’ina, Delaware, Eastern Abnaki, Eastern Pomo, Esselen, Etchemin, Eyak, Eyeri, Fox, Gros Ventre, Gullah, Gwich’in, Halkomelem, Haida, Hän, Havasupai, Havasupai-Hualapai, Hawaiian, Hawaiian Pidgin, Hidatsa, Holikachuk, Hopi, Hupa, Inupiaq, Ipai, Jicarilla, Karuk, Kashaya, Kathlamet, Kato, Kawaiisu, Kiowa, Klallam, Klamath-Modoc, Klickitat, Koasati, Konkow language, Koyukon, Kumeyaay, Kutenai, Lakota, Lipan, Louisiana Creole French, Lower Tanana, Luiseño, Lummi, Lushootseed, Mahican, Maidu, Makah, Malayalam, , Mandan, Maricopa, Massachusett, Mattole, Mednyj Aleut, Menominee, Mescalero-Chiricahua, Miami-Illinois, Mikasuki, Mi'kmaq, Mobilian Jargon, Mohawk, Mohawk Dutch, Mohegan-Pequot, Mojave, Mono, Munsee, Mutsun, Nanticoke language, Nawathinehena, Negerhollands, Nez Perce, Nisenan, Nlaka'pamux, Nooksack, Northeastern Pomo, Northern Kalapuya, Northern Paiute, Northern Pomo, Okanagan, Omaha-Ponca, Oneida, Onondaga, Osage, Pawnee, Paipai, Picuris, Piscataway, Plains Apache, Plains Cree, Potawatomi, Powhatan, Qawiaraq, Quechan, Quileute, Quiripi, Saanich, Sahaptin, Salinan, Salish, Samoan, Seneca, Shasta, Shawnee, Shoshone language, Solano, Southeastern Pomo, Southern Pomo, Southern Sierra Miwok, Southern Tiwa, Takelma, Tanacross, Taos, Tataviam, Tewa, Tillamook, Timbisha, Tipai, Tlingit, Tolowa, Tongva, Tonkawa, Tsetsaut, Tübatulabal, Tuscarora, Twana, Unami, Upper Kuskokwim, Upper Tanana, Ventureño, Virgin Islands Creole, Wailaki, Wappo, Wasco-Wishram, Washo, Whulshootseed, Wichita, Winnebago, Wintu, Wiyot, Wyandot, Yahi, Yana, Yaqui, Yavapai, Yoncalla, Yuchi, Yuki, Yurok

Many languages are used, or historically have been used in the United States. The most commonly used language is English. There are also many languages indigenous to North America or to U.S. states or holdings in the Pacific region. Languages brought to the country by colonists or immigrants from Europe, Asia, or other parts of the world make up a large portion of the languages currently used; several languages, including creoles and sign languages, have also developed in the United States. Approximately 337 languages are spoken or signed by the population, of which 176 are indigenous to the area. Fifty-two languages formerly spoken in the country's territory are now extinct.

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The Central Algonquian languages are commonly grouped together as a subgroup of the larger Algonquian family, itself a member of the Algic family. Though this grouping is often encountered in the literature, it is an areal grouping rather than a genetic one. In other words, the languages are grouped together because they were spoken near each other, not because they are any closer related to one another than to any other Algonquian language. Within the Algonquian family, only Eastern Algonquian constitutes a separate genetic subgroup.

Within the Central Algonquian grouping languages that are closely related are Potawatomi and Chippewa otherwise known as the Ojibwe, which are generally grouped together as an Ojibwa-Potawatomi sub-branch. David J. Costa spectulcated in his 2003-2004 web publications that within Central Algonquian there is a specific language sub-branch he refers to as "Eastern Great Lakes". The hypothesis for this subgroup is based on lexical and phonological innovations.

The Miami (Miami-Illinois: Myaaniaki) are a Native American nation originally found in what is now Indiana, southwest Michigan, and western Ohio. The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma is the only federally recognized tribe of Miami Indians in the United States. The Miami Nation of Indiana is an unrecognized tribe.

The name Miami derives from the tribe's autonym (name for themselves) in their Algonquian language, Miami-Illinois, Myaamia (plural Myaamiaki); this appears to have come from an older term meaning "downstream people." Some scholars contended the Miami called themselves the Twightwee (also spelled Twatwa), supposedly an onomatopoeic reference to their sacred bird, the sandhill crane. Recent studies have shown that Twightwee derives from the Delaware language exonym for the Miamis, tuwéhtuwe, a name of unknown etymology. Some Miamis have stated that this was only a name used by other tribes for the Miamis, and not the autonym which the Miamis used for themselves. Another common term was Mihtohseeniaki (the people). The Miami continue to use this autonym today.

Miami-Illinois (Myaamia IPA: [mjɑːmia]) is a Native American Algonquian language formerly spoken in the United States, primarily in Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, western Ohio and adjacent areas along the Mississippi River by the tribes of the Illinois Confederacy, including the Kaskaskia, Peoria, Tamaroa, Cahokia, and Mitchigamea. Since the 1990s the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma has worked to revive it in a joint project with Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

Miami-Illinois is an Algonquian language within the larger Algic language family. The name "Miami-Illinois" is a cover term for a cluster of highly similar dialects, the primary ones being Miami proper, Peoria, Wea, Piankeshaw, and, in the older Jesuit records, Illinois. About half of the surviving several hundred speakers were displaced in the 19th century from their territories, eventually settling in northeastern Oklahoma as the Miami Nation and the Peoria Tribe. The remainder of the Miami stayed behind in northern Indiana.

The Algonquian languages (/ælˈɡɒŋkwiən/ or /ælˈɡɒŋkiən/; also Algonkian) are a subfamily of Native American languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family. The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the indigenous Ojibwe language (Chippewa), which is a senior member of the Algonquian language family. The term "Algonquin" has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet word elakómkwik (pronounced [ɛlæˈɡomoɡwik]), "they are our relatives/allies". A number of Algonquian languages, like many of the Iroquoian languages of the hereditary enemies of the Algonquian peoples have already become extinct.

Speakers of Algonquian languages stretch from the east coast of North America to the Rocky Mountains. The proto-language from which all of the languages of the family descend, Proto-Algonquian, was spoken around 2,500 to 3,000 years ago. There is no scholarly consensus as to the territory where this language was spoken.

The Illinois Confederation, sometimes referred to as the Illiniwek or Illini, were a group of twelve to thirteen Native American tribes in the upper Mississippi River valley of North America. The tribes were the Kaskaskia, the Cahokia, the Peoria, the Tamaroa, Moingwena, Michigamea, Albiui, Amonokoa, Chepoussa, Chinkoa, Coiracoentanon, Espeminkia, Maroa, Matchinkoa, Michibousa, Negawichi, and Tapouara. At the time of European contact in the 17th century, they were believed to number over ten thousand people. They occupied a broad inverted triangle from modern day Iowa to near the shores of Lake Michigan in modern Chicago south to modern Arkansas. By the mid-18th century only five principal tribes remained (Cahokia, Kaskaskia, Michigamea, Peoria, and Tamaroa), and by the 19th century two: Kaskaskia and Peoria.

Illinois is from a French rendering of ilinwe (pl. iliniwek). Ilinwe is in turn an Odawa language rendering of irenweewa. (The Ottawa were a neighboring tribe, whom the French met first.) Irenweewa means he-who-speaks-the-common-way in the Illinois Confederation language but the confederation word for themselves was inoca (inoka). Unlike the plural form iliniwek, the term illini does not appear to have an historic linguistic connection.

Illinois Algonquin

The languages of North America reflect not only that continent's indigenous peoples, but the European colonization as well. The most widely spoken languages in North America (which includes Central America and the Caribbean islands) are English, Spanish, French, Danish (almost entirely exclusive to Greenland alone), and, especially in the Caribbean, creole languages lexified by them.

North America is home to a large number of language families and some language isolates. In the Arctic north, the Eskimo–Aleut languages are spoken from Alaska to Greenland. This group includes the Aleut language of the Aleutian Islands, the Yupik languages of Alaska and the Russian Far East, and the Inuit languages of Alaska, Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and Greenland.

The Algonquian are one of the most populous and widespread North American native language groups, with tribes originally numbering in the hundreds. Today hundreds of thousands of individuals identify with various Algonquian peoples. Historically the peoples were prominent along the Atlantic Coast and into the interior along the St. Lawrence River and around the Great Lakes. This grouping consists of peoples who speak Algonquian languages.

Indigenous languages of the Americas are spoken by indigenous peoples from Alaska and Greenland to the southern tip of South America, encompassing the land masses that constitute the Americas. These indigenous languages consist of dozens of distinct language families, as well as many language isolates and unclassified languages.

Many proposals to group these into higher-level families have been made, such as in three macrofamilies of Eskimo–Aleut, Na-Dene, and Amerind. This scheme is rejected by nearly all specialists. According to UNESCO, most of the indigenous American languages in North America are critically endangered, and many are already extinct. The most widely spoken indigenous language is Southern Quechua, with about 6 to 7 million speakers, primarily in South America.

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Illinois ( ) is a state in the Midwestern United States. It is the 5th most populous and 25th most extensive state, and is often noted as a microcosm of the entire country. With Chicago in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to other global ports from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean; as well as the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River, via the Illinois River. For decades, O'Hare International Airport has been ranked as one of the world's busiest airports. Illinois has long had a reputation as a bellwether both in social and cultural terms and politics.

Illinois ( ) is a state in the Midwestern United States. It is the 5th most populous and 25th most extensive state, and is often noted as a microcosm of the entire country. With Chicago in the northeast, small industrial cities and great agricultural productivity in central and northern Illinois, and natural resources like coal, timber, and petroleum in the south, Illinois has a diverse economic base and is a major transportation hub. The Port of Chicago connects the state to other global ports from the Great Lakes, via the Saint Lawrence Seaway, to the Atlantic Ocean; as well as the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River, via the Illinois River. For decades, O'Hare International Airport has been ranked as one of the world's busiest airports. Illinois has long had a reputation as a bellwether both in social and cultural terms and politics.

The Algonquian languages ( or ; also Algonkian) are a subfamily of Native American languages which includes most of the languages in the Algic language family. The name of the Algonquian language family is distinguished from the orthographically similar Algonquin dialect of the Ojibwe language, which is a member of the Algonquian language family. The term "Algonquin" has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet word elakómkwik (pronounced ), "they are our relatives/allies". A number of Algonquian languages have already become extinct.

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