Question:

How fast can pneumonia kill you?

Answer:

Staph germ causes quick, deadly pneumonia, Drug-resistant infection can kill in 72 hours, researchers say.

More Info:

How fast can pneumonia Drug-resistant infection pneumonia Medicine Staphylococcaceae

Actinobacteria (high-G+C)
Firmicutes (low-G+C)
Tenericutes (no wall)

Aquificae
Deinococcus-Thermus
Fibrobacteres–Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes (FCB group)
Fusobacteria
Gemmatimonadetes
Nitrospirae
Planctomycetes–Verrucomicrobia/Chlamydiae (PVC group)
Proteobacteria
Spirochaetes
Synergistetes

Pneumonia can be classified in several ways, most commonly by where it was acquired (hospital versus community), but may also by the area of lung affected or by the causative organism. There is also a combined clinical classification, which combines factors such as age, risk factors for certain microorganisms, the presence of underlying lung disease or systemic disease, and whether the person has recently been hospitalized.

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is infectious pneumonia in a person who has not recently been hospitalized. CAP is the most common type of pneumonia. The most common causes of CAP vary depending on a person's age, but they include Streptococcus pneumoniae, viruses, the atypical bacteria, and Haemophilus influenzae. Overall, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia worldwide. Gram-negative bacteria cause CAP in certain at-risk populations. CAP is the fourth most common cause of death in the United Kingdom and the sixth in the United States. The term "walking pneumonia" has been used to describe a type of community-acquired pneumonia of less severity (because the sufferer can continue to "walk" rather than require hospitalization). Walking pneumonia is usually caused by the atypical bacterium, Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Infectious diseases, also known as transmissible diseases or communicable diseases, comprise clinically evident illness (i.e., characteristic medical signs and/or symptoms of disease) resulting from the infection, presence and growth of pathogenic biological agents in an individual host organism. In certain cases, infectious diseases may be asymptomatic for much or even all of their course in a given host. In the latter case, the disease may only be defined as a "disease" (which by definition means an illness) in hosts who secondarily become ill after contact with an asymptomatic carrier. An infection is not synonymous with an infectious disease, as some infections do not cause illness in a host.

Infectious pathogens include some viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, multicellular parasites, and aberrant proteins known as prions. These pathogens are the cause of disease epidemics, in the sense that without the pathogen, no infectious epidemic occurs.

Health Pneumonia Health Medical Pharma Social Issues
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
16