Question:

How far is Thermopolis, Wyoming from Billings, Montana?

Answer:

From Billings, Montana to Thermopolis, Wyoming is 194 miles; about a 3 hour and 31 minute drive along US-310 E and US-20 E/WY-789 S. Would you like directions?

More Info:


Wyoming Highway 789
Wyoming Highway 789 marker / near Creston Junction
in Rawlins
in Three Forks
south of Lander
in Riverton
in Shoshoni
State highways in Wyoming Wyoming Highway 789 (WYO 789) is a state route in the U.S. state of Wyoming in the United States. Wyoming Highway 789 runs north to south from the Montana border to the Colorado border. For most of its length, it is joined with other routes. Wyoming Highway 789 begins at the Colorado border just south of Baggs. It travels north for about four miles (6 km) to Baggs. After Baggs, it continues north for about 45 miles (72 km) until it reaches the county line. After crossing the county line, WYO 789 travels north for about 6 miles (9.7 km) where it reaches Exit 187 at Interstate 80/US 30. Wyoming Highway 789 joins I-80/US 30 eastbound. Wyoming Highway 789, with I-80 and US 30, re-enters Carbon County. Just west of Rawlins, Wyoming Highway 789 leaves at Exit 211, joining Business Loop 80 through Rawlins. North of town, Wyoming Highway 789 intersects U.S. Route 287 and joins it north for 50 miles (80 km) to the county line, after which it passes through Natrona County for about 2 miles (3.2 km). WYO 789/US 287 continue bearing in a northwest direction, passing through the towns of Jeffrey City and Sweetwater Station. About 40 miles (64 km) from Sweetwater Station, WYO 789/US 287 enters Lander. Wyoming Highway 789 splits from US 287 here and continues northeast for 24 miles (39 km), alone, to Riverton. Wyoming Highway 789 joins U.S. Route 26 until they reach Shoshoni. Here, Wyoming Highway 789/US 26 intersect U.S. Route 20 where WYO 789 continues north with US 20 west. WYO 789 and US 20 continue through the Wind River Canyon into Thermopolis. From there, the highway veers off in a northeasterly direction into Washakie County. From the Washakie county line, the highway travels approximately 21 miles (34 km) before crossing the Big Horn River into Worland where it joins U.S Routes 16 and 20. Upon crossing into Big Horn County, WYO 789/US 16/US 20 veers back to the northwest and crosses back over the Big Horn River after reaching Manderson. It continues on 20 miles (32 km) to the north through Basin and Greybull. Upon reaching Greybull, WYO 789/US 16/US 20 head west and join US 14 for about five miles (8 km). At that point, Wyoming Highway 789 separates from the multiplex of US 14/16/20 and returns to its northern path along with US 310 for about 28 miles (45 km) to the town of Lovell. For three miles (5 km), WYO 789/US 310 runs west along Alternate US 14. WYO 789/US 310 then turns north three miles (5 km) to Cowley and then heads west seven miles (11 km) to Deaver. From Deaver, WYO 789/US 310 runs six miles (10 km) north along the Park County line to Frannie. The highway leaves Wyoming on the eastern edge of Park County and enters Montana. Here, the 789 designation is dropped, while US 310 continues along the highway. Highway 789 was part of a proposed border-to-border U.S. Route 789 that would have run from Sweetgrass, Montana to Nogales, Arizona. After the US 789 proposal was rejected by AASHTO, U.S. Route 789 became part of a series of state highways numbered "789" running along the proposed route. Wyoming, however, was the only state that actually applied the number to an existing highway (the other states simply added a concurrent SR 789 over existing highways). Because of this, all the states except Wyoming deleted the designation and removed the signs.

Thermopolis, Wyoming
Thermopolis (Arapaho: Xonoú'oo' ) is the largest town in, and the county seat of Hot Springs County, Wyoming, United States. As of the 2010 census, the town population was 3,009. "Thermopolis" (thur-MOP-uh-LISS) is from the Greek for "Hot City". It is home to numerous natural hot springs, in which mineral-laden waters are heated by geothermal processes. The town is named for the hot springs located there. The town claims the world's largest mineral hot spring as part of Hot Springs State Park. The springs are open to the public for free as part of an 1896 treaty signed with the Shoshone and Arapaho Indian tribes. Thermopolis is also the home of the Wyoming Dinosaur Center, which hosts the only Archaeopteryx fossil outside Europe. Thermopolis is located at (43.645667, −108.214641). and sits at 4,331 feet in elevation. Thermopolis is located near the northern end of the Wind River Canyon and Wedding of the Waters, where the north-flowing Wind River becomes the Bighorn River. Thermopolis is ringed by mountains, with the Bridger Mountains to the southeast, the Owl Creek Mountains to the southwest, the Big Horn Mountains to the northeast and the Absaroka Range to the northwest. Thermopolis is the southern-most municipality in the Big Horn Basin. Roundtop Mountain, on the northern edge of town, is a unique geological formation shaped much like a volcano. It sits at approximately 6,000 feet and is the highest area in the immediate vicinity of Thermopolis. A large body of water, Boysen Reservoir, lies approximately 17 miles south of Thermopolis and is inhabited by many native species of fish including rainbow, cutthroat and brown trout, walleye, perch and northern pike among others. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 2.47 square miles (6.40 km2), of which, 2.38 square miles (6.16 km2) of it is land and 0.09 square miles (0.23 km2) is water. Thermopolis experiences a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk) with cold, dry winters and hot, dry summers. In fact, the town features Wyoming's highest average daytime temperatures in July and August. As of the census of 2010, there were 3,009 people, 1,389 households, and 818 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,264.3 inhabitants per square mile (488.1 /km2). There were 1,583 housing units at an average density of 665.1 per square mile (256.8 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 96.4% White, 0.3% African American, 0.9% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.2% of the population. There were 1,389 households of which 24.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.3% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.1% were non-families. 35.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.70. The median age in the town was 47 years. 20.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.2% were from 25 to 44; 30.5% were from 45 to 64; and 22.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 49.1% male and 50.9% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 3,172 people, 1,342 households, and 849 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,331.0 people per square mile (514.6/km2). There were 1,568 housing units at an average density of 657.9 per square mile (254.4/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 95.90% White, 0.47% African American, 1.70% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.50% from other races, and 1.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.30% of the population. There were 1,342 households out of which 26.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.7% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.86. In the town the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 89.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.3 males. The median income for a household in the town was $29,205, and the median income for a family was $38,448. Males had a median income of $26,824 versus $18,438 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,648. About 8.3% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.3% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over. Because of Hot Springs State Park, tourism is of considerable economic importance to Thermopolis. A state maintained herd of American Bison reside in Hot Springs State Park, which extends into the northeast corner of town. Two hot mineral water concessions with numerous water slides and other attractions, the Teepee Pools, Teepee Fountain and Star Plunge are located within the park. Two hotels, Days Inn-Safari Club and Best Western-Plaza Inn, are also in the park. Other tourism-related businesses in and near the town include the Hot Springs County Museum and Cultural Center, the Wyoming Dinosaur Center and Wind River Canyon Whitewater Rafting. Thermopolis (indeed, all of Hot Springs County) levies a 4% lodging tax for boarders in county hotels and motels. The Hot Springs County Museum and Cultural Center has an eclectic collection of memorabilia from local pioneers circa 1890 through 1910, with plans to focus on Tim McCoy, who lived in Hot Springs County from 1912 to 1942, during which he built the High Eagle Ranch about 45 miles west of town. He worked for many years as an actor in what are now called B westerns, or lower-budget cowboy movies in Hollywood. Nearby East Thermopolis is home to the Wyoming Dinosaur Center, a private organization that conducts paleontology digs in the area and maintains a visitor center with a museum, gift shop and snack bar. They offer daily tours of the dig site that allow visitors to participate in excavations. Every May since 1993, thousands of cagers have descended upon Thermopolis for the annual 3 on 3 Hot Spot Shootout Basketball Tournament. The event is typically hosted on the first weekend in May (Friday, Saturday, Sunday), but has also been held on the second weekend in May. The tournament shuts down several blocks of the city for the weekend, as up to 60+ temporary basketball courts are constructed on city streets in the downtown area. The event is co-sponsored by the Hot Springs County Chamber of Commerce and Hoop World Basketball [1]. 12 miles north of Thermopolis is the town of Kirby, home of Butch's Place, a restaurant and bar known for their "Big Burger", and the Wyoming Whiskey plant. Public education in the town of Thermopolis is provided by Hot Springs County School District #1 [2] It is the only school district in the county. HSCSD1 includes Ralph Witters Elementary School, Thermopolis Middle School, Hot Springs County High School, and a building for the county auditorium and district administrative offices, all in Thermopolis. Lucerne Intermediate School, a facility for fourth and fifth graders located in Lucerne, closed in 2005. Fourth and fifth graders now attend the recently expanded Ralph Witters Elementary. All of HSCSD1's athletic teams are known as the Thermopolis Bobcats. Their colors are purple and gold. The United States Postal Service operates the Thermopolis Post Office under zip code 82443. The Wyoming Department of Health's Wyoming Pioneer Home, an assisted living facility for the elderly owned and run by the State of Wyoming, is located in Thermopolis. The facility was operated by the Wyoming Board of Charities and Reform until that agency was dissolved as a result of a state constitutional amendment passed in November 1990. The facility sits in the heart of the scenic Hot Springs State Park. Hot Springs Memorial Hospital is a full-service hospital located in East Thermopolis. It is a 25 bed Critical Access Hospital that provides state of the art equipment.

Wyoming Highway 120
Wyoming Highway 120 marker State highways in Wyoming Wyoming Highway 120 is a 121.96 miles (196.28 km) state highway in central Hot Springs and eastern Park County, Wyoming that travels northwest to Montana Highway 72 at the state line. Wyoming Highway 120 begins its south end in Thermopolis at US 20/WYO 789. It heads west on West Broadway Street out of Thermopolis losing the name and heading northwest. As Wyoming Highway 120 heads northwest it intersects Wyoming Highway 170, at just under nine miles, that travels to nearby Hamilton Dome. Further northwest the highway intersects Wyoming Highway 171 at just under 27 miles. WYO 171 travels to nearby Grass Creek. Wyoming Highway 431 is intersected at approximately 33 miles into the route, and it travels east along Gooseberry Creek to US 20/WYO 789 located southwest of Worland. Wyoming 120 continues heading northwest and leaves Hot Springs County behind and enters Park County from the southeast. Soon it reaches Meeteetse where it intersects with Wyoming Highway 290 (Park Avenue). After leaving Meeteese, WYO 120 intersects no other state highways until it reaches Cody. Highway 120 enters Cody from the south as Meeteetse Highway. It intersects the multiplexed US 14/US 16/US 20 (Greybull Highway) at the foot of Yellowstone Regional Airport. WYO 120 turns west and runs concurrent with the multiplexed routes in downtown Cody that then turns into 17th Street as the highway turns north. At Sheridan Avenue, WYO 120 turns west again with US 14/US 16/US 20. The concurrency with these routes ends one block later at an intersection with the western terminus of US 14A. WYO 120 turns north onto 16th Street and runs concurrent now with US Route 14A. This concurrency ends a half-mile later, as Highway 120 turns east onto Belfry Highway to continue its northwesterly course and to leave Cody, while US 14A heads east. Wyoming Highway 120 zigzags northwest out of Cody, and at approximately 85.5 miles, it intersects Former Wyoming Highway 293, that used to serve oil fields, state lands, and the Park County airport. This route was turned back to county maintenance in the early 1990s. The next major highway 120 encounters the eastern terminus of Wyoming Highway 296 (Chief Joseph Scenic Byway) at 101.01 miles into the route. After encountering WYO 296, Highway 120 turns to start heading in a north-northeast direction. At 113.83 miles, WYO 120 intersects the Former Wyoming Highway 292 (Clarks Fork Canyon Road). This route was also turned over to the county highway department for maintenance. A half-mile after, Highway 120 intersects the northern terminus of Wyoming Highway 294 is intersected, which travels southeast to US 14A near Ralston. Wyoming Highway 120 reaches the Montana-Wyoming State Line at 121.96 miles and ends. The highway continues as Montana Highway 72 as it turns northeast toward Laurel, Montana and US 310. Wyoming Highway 120 emerged in 1945 to replace Wyoming 420 south of Cody and a new road north of Cody. Wyoming Highway 120 was commissioned to replace Wyoming Highway 420 and the state of Wyoming wanted to use the lowest number available, which was 120. When Wyoming numbered its state primary routes that were spurs of U.S. routes in the 1920s and 1930s, the state hoped to elevate them to U.S. route status. However, after the Great Recommissioning of 1936, Wyoming started to number its state auxiliary routes from the lowest number available.

Worland, Wyoming
Worland is a city in Washakie County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 5,487 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Washakie County. The City of Worland is served by the Worland Municipal Airport. Worland is located at (44.015387, −107.956632). It is located on the Big Horn River, in the Big Horn Basin. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.64 square miles (12.02 km2), of which, 4.56 square miles (11.81 km2) is land and 0.08 square miles (0.21 km2) is water. Worland experiences an arid climate (Köppen BWk) with long, cold, dry winters and hot, wetter summers. As of the census of 2010, there were 5,487 people, 2,310 households, and 1,479 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,203.3 inhabitants per square mile (464.6 /km2). There were 2,473 housing units at an average density of 542.3 per square mile (209.4 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.9% White, 0.3% African American, 1.3% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 5.3% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.6% of the population. There were 2,310 households of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 9.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.0% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.95. The median age in the city was 39.8 years. 25.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.5% were from 25 to 44; 26.5% were from 45 to 64; and 17.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.5% male and 51.5% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,250 people, 2,130 households, and 1,439 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,274.1 people per square mile (492.0/km2). There were 2,334 housing units at an average density of 566.4 per square mile (218.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.47% White, 0.06% African American, 0.57% Native American, 0.84% Asian, 6.72% from other races, and 2.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.49% of the population. There were 2,130 households out of which 32.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 9.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.00. In the city the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 25.3% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males. The median income for a household in the city was $31,447, and the median income for a family was $42,453. Males had a median income of $31,411 versus $20,777 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,208. About 9.7% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 22.4% of those under age 18 and 15.6% of those age 65 or over. The United States Postal Service operates the Worland Post Office. The Wyoming Department of Family Services Juvenile Services Division operates the Wyoming Boys' School, located in Mc Nutt, unincorporated Washakie County, near Worland. The facility was operated by the Wyoming Board of Charities and Reform until that agency was dissolved as a result of a state constitutional amendment passed in November 1990. Public education in the city of Worland is provided by Washakie County School District #1. The district operates five campuses – East Side Elementary, South Side Elementary, West Side Elementary, Worland Middle School, and Worland High School.

Lovell, Wyoming
Lovell is a town in Big Horn County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 2,360 at the 2010 census. Lovell was named for Henry Lovell, a local rancher. Built in 1925, the EJZ Bridge over Shoshone River is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Lovell is located at (44.836787, -108.392180). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.10 square miles (2.85 km2), all of it land. Lovell experiences a temperate desert climate (Köppen BWk) with cold, dry winters and hot, slightly wetter summers. At the 2010 census, there were 2,360 people, 909 households and 605 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,145.5 inhabitants per square mile (828.4 /km2). There were 1,013 housing units at an average density of 920.9 per square mile (355.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 94.0% White, 0.3% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 3.5% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.8% of the population. There were 909 households of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.4% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.13. The median age was 36 years. 27.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 20.6% were from 25 to 44; 23.4% were from 45 to 64; and 19.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 48.4% male and 51.6% female. At the 2000 census, there were 2,281 people, 896 households and 613 families residing in the town. The population density was 2,141.6 per square mile (823.1/km²). There were 1,013 housing units at an average density of 951.1 per square mile (365.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 90.93% White, 0.04% African American, 0.70% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, 5.66% from other races, and 2.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.16% of the population. There were 896 households of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.5% were non-families. 27.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.14. 29.2% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.8% from 18 to 24, 22.0% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 100.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.9 males. The median household income was $30,745 and the median family income was $35,815. Males had a median income of $30,698 compared with $20,313 for females. The per capita income was $13,772. About 11.0% of families and 14.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.5% of those under age 18 and 8.3% of those age 65 or over. Public education in the town of Lovell is provided by Big Horn County School District #2. Lovell is home to Lovell Elementary School (grades K-5), Lovell Middle School (grades 6-8), and Lovell High School (grades 9-12). Lovell High School is expected to total an average of 50 students per grade through the 2010-2011 school year. The dominant religion is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. There are several other churches in town including Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Baptist. There is also a small group of Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints living near town. The town was the center of a scandal in the 1980s when Dr. John Story was discovered to be sexually abusing patients. He was convicted on six separate charges of sexually assaulting his patients in 1985.

Hot Springs County, Wyoming
Hot Springs County is a county located in the U.S. state of Wyoming. As of 2010, the population was 4,812. Its county seat is Thermopolis. The county is named for the hot springs located in Hot Springs State Park. Hot Springs County was created on February 21, 1911 with land detached from Big Horn County, Fremont County, and Park County. Hot Springs County was named for the hot springs located in the county seat of Thermopolis. In the 2008 United States presidential election, Hot Springs County was the only county in the entire Mountain West outside of Arizona where John McCain beat George W. Bush's percentage of the county vote from the 2004 election. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 2,006 square miles (5,195.5 km2), of which 2,004 square miles (5,190.3 km2) is land and 2 square miles (5.2 km2) (0.12%) is water. It is the smallest county in Wyoming and the largest county in the US that is a state's smallest county. Hot Springs County includes the southern portion of Wyoming's Big Horn Basin, and is surrounded by mountains. Most of the Wind River Canyon, with the Owl Creek Mountains on the west and Bridger Mountains on the east is in Hot Springs County, while the Bighorn Mountains ring the east portion on the county and the Absaroka Range is to the west. A small portion of the Shoshone National Forest lies in the westernmost part of the county. The Wind River Indian Reservation extends into southern Hot Springs County. As of the census of 2000, there were 4,882 people, 2,108 households, and 1,353 families residing in the county. The population density was 2 people per square mile (1/km²). There were 2,536 housing units at an average density of 1 per square mile (0/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.96% White, 0.35% Black or African American, 1.52% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.63% from other races, and 1.29% from two or more races. 2.38% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.3% were of German, 17.0% English, 12.2% Irish, 8.2% American and 6.0% Norwegian ancestry according to Census 2000. There were 2,108 households out of which 25.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.30% were married couples living together, 7.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.80% were non-families. 31.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.82. In the county the population was spread out with 22.00% under the age of 18, 5.90% from 18 to 24, 23.30% from 25 to 44, 28.70% from 45 to 64, and 20.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 92.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.80 males. The median income for a household in the county was $29,888, and the median income for a family was $39,364. Males had a median income of $27,030 versus $18,667 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,858. About 8.60% of families and 10.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.10% of those under age 18 and 7.90% of those age 65 or over. The Wyoming Department of Health Wyoming Pioneer Home, an assisted living facility for elderly people, is located in Thermopolis. The facility was operated by the Wyoming Board of Charities and Reform until that agency was dissolved as a result of a state constitutional amendment passed in November 1990.

Meeteetse, Wyoming
Meeteetse is a town in Park County, Wyoming, United States. The population was 327 at the 2010 census. The town’s name is derived from the Indian term for "meeting place." Meeteetse is located at (44.155954, -108.869022). According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 0.87 square miles (2.25 km2), all of it land. As of the census of 2010, there were 327 people, 153 households, and 94 families residing in the town. The population density was 375.9 inhabitants per square mile (145.1 /km2). There were 177 housing units at an average density of 203.4 per square mile (78.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.6% White, 0.6% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.6% from other races, and 0.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.8% of the population. There were 153 households of which 20.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.6% were non-families. 33.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.74. The median age in the town was 51.3 years. 20.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 4.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 16% were from 25 to 44; 35.1% were from 45 to 64; and 23.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 51.7% male and 48.3% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 351 people, 151 households, and 94 families residing in the town. The population density was 428.7 people per square mile (165.3/km²). There were 188 housing units at an average density of 229.6 per square mile (88.5/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 97.15% White, 0.28% Native American, 0.28% Pacific Islander, 0.85% from other races, and 1.42% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.56% of the population. There were 151 households out of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.3% were married couples living together, 4.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.1% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 3.00. In the town the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 28.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 106.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males. The median income for a household in the town was $29,167, and the median income for a family was $31,953. Males had a median income of $21,250 versus $18,125 for females. The per capita income for the town was $12,030. About 5.8% of families and 10.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.6% of those under age 18 and 14.9% of those age 65 or over. Public education in the town of Meeteetse is provided by Park County School District #16. Meeteetse School, a K-12 campus, serves the town. On State Street, which is the main road in town, is retail shop of the Meeteese Chocolatier, which sells gourmet chocolate to fans around the world. The business was created by saddle bronc rider Tim Kellogg as a way to make money when he needed to buy a new saddle. Kellogg continues to make every single item in his store, resulting in small batches with unusual flavors like Coor's or mesquite truffles. There are a number of museums in Meeteetse,including the Charles Belden Museum of Western Photography, the Meeteetse Museum, and the First National Bank Museum. The Belden Museum features the photographs of Charles Belden, mostly taken in the 1920s and 1930s. The Meeteetse Museum showcases the history of Meeteetse and the surrounding area and includes exhibits on the endangered black-footed ferret, the Meeteetse Mercantile, the Forest Service Cabin, and local ranch families and cowboys. The Bank Museum is located in the old First National Bank Building, this building is on the National Register of Historic Places and has recently undergone restoration. The Bank Museum features photography and other art exhibits throughout the year, in addition to artifacts from the bank's past. Meeteetse was where the last known wild population of black-footed ferrets was discovered in 1981. All black-footed ferrets today are descended from these animals.
Montana Billings Thermopolis Wyoming Billings, Montana Wyoming Highway 789 Wyoming Highway 120 Wyoming Geography of the United States Thermopolis, Wyoming
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
67