Question:

How far is the pitcher's mound from homeplate in Major League baseball?

Answer:

The pitching mound in baseball is 60 feet and 6 inches from home plate. Thanks AnswerParty!

More Info:

pitcher Sports Baseball Games
Baseball pitching

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. Traditionally, the pitcher also bats. Starting in 1973 with the American League and spreading throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the hitting duties of the pitcher have generally been given over to the position of designated hitter, a cause of some controversy. The National League in Major League Baseball and the Japanese Central League are among the remaining leagues which have not adopted the designated hitter position.

In most cases, the objective of the pitcher is to deliver the pitch to the catcher without allowing the batter to hit the ball with the bat. A successful pitch is delivered in such a way that the batter either allows the pitch to pass through the strike zone, swings the bat at the ball and misses it, or hits the ball poorly (resulting in a pop fly or ground out). If the batter elects not to swing at the pitch, it is called a strike if any part of the ball passes through the strike zone and a ball is when no part of the ball passes through the strike zone. A check swing is when the batter begins to swing, but then stops the swing short. If the batter successfully checks the swing and the pitch is out of the strike zone, it is called a ball.


Baseball rules

The rules of baseball differ slightly from league to league, but in general share the same basic gameplay.

Ball games
Baseball field

A baseball field, also called a ball field or a baseball diamond, is the field upon which the game of baseball is played. The term is also used as a metonym for baseball park.


Calfee Park

Pulaski Counts, (1942, 1946 - 1950)
Pulaski Phillies, (1952 - 1955)
Pulaski Cubs, (1957 - 1958)
Pulaski Phillies, (1969 - 1977)
Pulaski Braves, (1982 - 1992)
Pulaski Rangers, (1997 - 2002)
Pulaski Blue Jays, (2003 - 2006)
Pulaski Mariners, (2008 - present)

Calfee Park is a stadium in Pulaski, Virginia, USA. It is primarily used for baseball, and is currently the home field of the Seattle Mariners' Appalachian League affiate, the Pulaski Mariners. It was built in 1935 as a Works Progress Administration project, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Calfee Park was named after the mayor of Pulaski in 1935, Ernest W. Calfee. It holds approximately 2,500 people. The director of stadium operations is Dave Hart and the head groundskeeper is Gary Martin.


All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

The All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was a women's professional baseball league founded by Philip K. Wrigley which existed from 1943 to 1954. During the league's history, over 600 women played ball.


Human Interest

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a North American professional baseball league consisting of teams that play in the American League and National League. The two leagues, dating to 1901 and 1876 respectively as separate legal entities, merged in 2000 into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball.

MLB constitutes one of the four major professional sports leagues of North America. It is composed of thirty teams: twenty-nine in the United States and one in Canada. Teams in MLB play 162 games each season over six months (April through September). Five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven-games championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903.


Major League

See Major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada.

Major League may also refer to:

News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
37