Question:

How do i enable java script on a samsung schr451c mobile phone?

Answer:

You will need to download OpenP2M for Java 1.6. The Samsung SGH-R451c a standard QWERTY keypad hidden behind the 2.1" display.

More Info:


mobile phone

A mobile phone (also known as a cellular phone, cell phone, and a hand phone) is a device that can make and receive telephone calls over a radio link while moving around a wide geographic area. It does so by connecting to a cellular network provided by a mobile phone operator, allowing access to the public telephone network. By contrast, a cordless telephone is used only within the short range of a single, private base station.

In addition to telephony, modern mobile phones also support a wide variety of other services such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, gaming and photography. Mobile phones that offer these and more general computing capabilities are referred to as smartphones.


Mobile phone

A mobile phone (also known as a cellular phone, cell phone, and a hand phone) is a device that can make and receive telephone calls over a radio link while moving around a wide geographic area. It does so by connecting to a cellular network provided by a mobile phone operator, allowing access to the public telephone network. By contrast, a cordless telephone is used only within the short range of a single, private base station.

In addition to telephony, modern mobile phones also support a wide variety of other services such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, gaming and photography. Mobile phones that offer these and more general computing capabilities are referred to as smartphones.


Mobile game

A mobile game is a video game played on a feature phone, smartphone, PDA, tablet computer, portable media player or calculator. This does include games played on dedicated handheld video game systems such as Nintendo 3DS or PlayStation Vita.

The first game on a mobile phone was a Tetris game on the Hagenuk MT-2000 device from 1994.


Mobile telephony

Mobile telephony is the provision of telephone services to phones which may move around freely rather than stay fixed in one location. Mobile phones connect to a terrestrial cellular network of base stations (cell sites), whereas satellite phones connect to orbiting satellites. Both networks are interconnected to the public switched telephone network (PSTN) to allow any phone in the world to be dialed.

In 2010 there were estimated to be five billion mobile cellular subscriptions in the world.


Android (operating system)

Android is an operating system based on the Linux kernel, and designed primarily for touchscreen mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers. Initially developed by Android, Inc., which Google backed financially and later bought in 2005, Android was unveiled in 2007 along with the founding of the Open Handset Alliance: a consortium of hardware, software, and telecommunication companies devoted to advancing open standards for mobile devices. The first Android-powered phone was sold in October 2008.

The user interface of Android is based off direct manipulation, using touch inputs that loosely correspond to real-world actions, like swiping, tapping, pinching and reverse pinching to manipulate on-screen objects. Internal hardware such as accelerometers, gyroscopes and proximity sensors are used by some applications to respond to additional user actions, for example adjusting the screen from portrait to landscape depending on how the device is oriented. Android allows users to customize their homescreens with shortcuts to applications and widgets, which allow users to display live content, such as emails and weather information, directly on the homescreen. Applications can further send notifications to the user to inform them of relevant information, such as new emails and text messages.

Telecommunication
Camera phone

A camera phone is a mobile phone which is able to capture still photographs (and usually video). Since early in the 21st century the majority of mobile phones in use are camera phones.

Most camera phones are simpler than separate digital cameras. Their usual fixed-focus lenses and smaller sensors limit their performance in poor lighting. Lacking a physical shutter, most have a long shutter lag. Flash, where present, is usually weak. Optical zoom and tripod screws are rare. Some also lack a USB connection, removable memory card, or other way of transferring their pictures more quickly than by the phone's inherent communication feature.


Cellular network

A cellular network or mobile network is a wireless network distributed over land areas called cells, each served by at least one fixed-location transceiver, known as a cell site or base station. In a cellular network, each cell uses a different set of frequencies from neighboring cells, to avoid interference and provide guaranteed bandwidth within each cell.

When joined together these cells provide radio coverage over a wide geographic area. This enables a large number of portable transceivers (e.g., mobile phones, pagers, etc.) to communicate with each other and with fixed transceivers and telephones anywhere in the network, via base stations, even if some of the transceivers are moving through more than one cell during transmission.


Mobile payment

Mobile payment, also referred to as mobile money, mobile money transfer, and mobile wallet generally refer to payment services operated under financial regulation and performed from or via a mobile device. Instead of paying with cash, cheque, or credit cards, a consumer can use a mobile phone to pay for a wide range of services and digital or hard goods. Although the concept of using non-coin-based currency systems has a long history, it is only recently that the technology to support such systems has become widely available.

Mobile payment is being adopted all over the world in different ways. In 2008, the combined market for all types of mobile payments was projected to reach more than $600B globally by 2013, which would be double the figure as of February, 2011. The mobile payment market for goods and services, excluding contactless Near Field Communication or NFC transactions and money transfers, is expected to exceed $300B globally by 2013.

Mobile phone use while driving is common, but widely considered dangerous. Due to the number of accidents that are related to cell phone use while driving, some jurisdictions have made the use of a cell phone while driving illegal. Others have enacted laws to ban handheld mobile phone use, but allow use of a handsfree device. In some cases restrictions are directed only to minors or those who are newly qualified license holders.


Virgin Mobile

Virgin Mobile is a wireless communications brand used by eight independent brand-licensees worldwide. Virgin Mobile branded wireless communications services are currently available in Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, India, Poland, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Virgin Mobile branded services were formerly offered in Singapore and Qatar.

Each Virgin Mobile branded entity acts independently from the others, thus the handsets, service plans and network radio interfaces vary from country to country. In a given country, the Virgin Mobile wireless entity is typically a partnership between Richard Branson's Virgin Group and an existing mobile network operator or mobile virtual network operator.

Java

Java is a computer programming language that is concurrent, class-based, object-oriented, and specifically designed to have as few implementation dependencies as possible. It is intended to let application developers "write once, run anywhere" (WORA), meaning that code that runs on one platform does not need to be recompiled to run on another. Java applications are typically compiled to bytecode (class file) that can run on any Java virtual machine (JVM) regardless of computer architecture. Java is, as of 2012, one of the most popular programming languages in use, particularly for client-server web applications, with a reported 9 million developers. Java was originally developed by James Gosling at Sun Microsystems (which has since merged into Oracle Corporation) and released in 1995 as a core component of Sun Microsystems' Java platform. The language derives much of its syntax from C and C++, but it has fewer low-level facilities than either of them.

The original and reference implementation Java compilers, virtual machines, and class libraries were developed by Sun from 1991 and first released in 1995. As of May 2007, in compliance with the specifications of the Java Community Process, Sun relicensed most of its Java technologies under the GNU General Public License. Others have also developed alternative implementations of these Sun technologies, such as the GNU Compiler for Java (bytecode compiler), GNU Classpath (standard libraries), and IcedTea-Web (browser plugin for applets).

Java

Java is a set of several computer software products and specifications from Sun Microsystems (which has since merged with Oracle Corporation), that together provide a system for developing application software and deploying it in a cross-platform computing environment. Java is used in a wide variety of computing platforms from embedded devices and mobile phones on the low end, to enterprise servers and supercomputers on the high end. While less common, Java applets are sometimes used to provide improved and secure functions while browsing the World Wide Web on desktop computers.

Writing in the Java programming language is the primary way to produce code that will be deployed as Java bytecode. There are, however, bytecode compilers available for other languages such as Ada, JavaScript, Python, and Ruby. Several new languages have been designed to run natively on the Java Virtual Machine (JVM), such as Scala, Clojure and Groovy. Java syntax borrows heavily from C and C++, but object-oriented features are modeled after Smalltalk and Objective-C. Java eliminates certain low-level constructs such as pointers and has a very simple memory model where every object is allocated on the heap and all variables of object types are references. Memory management is handled through integrated automatic garbage collection performed by the JVM.

Groovy is an object-oriented programming language for the Java platform. It is a dynamic language with features similar to those of Python, Ruby, Perl, and Smalltalk. It can be used as a scripting language for the Java Platform, is dynamically compiled to Java Virtual Machine (JVM) bytecode, and interoperates with other Java code and libraries. Groovy uses a Java-like curly-bracket syntax. Most Java code is also syntactically valid Groovy.

Groovy 1.0 was released on January 2, 2007, and Groovy 2.0 in July, 2012. Groovy 3.0 is planned for release in early 2014, with support for Java 8 features and a new Meta Object Protocol. Since version 2, Groovy can also be compiled statically, offering type inference and performance close to, or even greater than, Java's. Groovy is backed by VMware, after its acquisition of SpringSource, which acquired G2One, the Groovy and Grails company.

Generic Java (Generic Java or GJ) is a programming language that is a superset of Java which adds support for generic programming. It was designed by Gilad Bracha, Martin Odersky, David Stoutamire, and Philip Wadler to offer developers a smoother transition and better Java compatibility than the Pizza programming language, previously created by Odersky and Wadler.

Generic Java was incorporated, with the addition of wildcards, into the official Java language version J2SE 5.0.


Sun Microsystems

Sun Microsystems logo.svg

Sun Microsystems, Inc. was a company that sold computers, computer components, computer software, and information technology services and that created the Java programming language, and the Network File System (NFS). Sun significantly evolved several key computing technologies, among them Unix, RISC Processors, Thin Client Computing, and virtualized computing. Sun was founded on February 24, 1982. At its height, Sun headquarters were in Santa Clara, California (part of Silicon Valley), on the former west campus of the Agnews Developmental Center.

The Metadata Facility for Java is a specification for Java that defines an API for annotating fields, methods, and classes as having particular attributes that indicate they should be processed in specific ways by development tools, deployment tools, or run-time libraries.

The specification was developed under the Java Community Process as JSR 175, and was released as a part of J2SE 5.0 (Tiger).

JavaScript
Scala (programming language)

Scala (/ˈskɑːlə/ SKAH-lə) is an object-functional programming and scripting language for general software applications, statically typed, designed to concisely express solutions in an elegant, type-safe and lightweight (low ceremonial) manner. Scala has full support for functional programming (including currying, pattern matching, algebraic data types, lazy evaluation, tail recursion, immutability, etc.). It cleans up what are often considered poor design decisions in Java (such as type erasure, checked exceptions, the non-unified type system) and adds a number of other features designed to allow cleaner, more concise and more expressive code to be written.

It is intended to be compiled to Java bytecode, so the resulting executable runs on the JVM, and Java libraries can be used directly in Scala code and vice-versa. Like Java, Scala is statically typed and object-oriented, uses a curly-brace syntax reminiscent of C. Unlike Java, Scala has many features of functional programming languages like Scheme, Standard ML and Haskell, including anonymous functions, type inference, list comprehensions (known in Scala as "for-comprehensions"), lazy initialization, extensive language and library support for avoiding side-effects, for pattern matching, case classes, delimited continuations, higher-order types, much better support for covariance and contravariance. Scala has a unified type system (as in C#, but unlike in Java), where all types, including primitive types like integer and boolean, are subclasses of the type Any. Scala likewise has other features present in C# but not Java, including anonymous types, operator overloading, optional parameters, named parameters, raw strings (that may be multi-line in Scala), and no checked exceptions.

Gosu is a general-purpose Java virtual machine-based programming language released under the Apache License 2.0. This general-purpose programming language is used in some open-source software projects, including the web application framework Ronin and the build-tool Vark, as well as in Guidewire Software commercial products for the insurance industry. The language is rooted in concepts from Java, C#, and ECMAScript, but borrows some constructs from Ruby and dynamic languages. Its most notable feature is its Open Type System API, which allows the language to be easily extended to provide compile-time checking for things that would typically be dynamically checked at runtime in many other languages.

Gosu began in 2002 as a scripting language called GScript at Guidewire Software. It was used to configure business logic in Guidewire's applications and was more of a simple rule definition language. In its original incarnation it followed ECMAScript guidelines. Guidewire enhanced the scripting language over the next 8 years, and released Gosu 0.7 beta to the community in November 2010. The 0.8 beta was released in December 2010, and 0.8.6 beta was released in mid-2011 with additional typeloaders, making Gosu capable of loading XML schema definition files (xsd's) and XML documents as native Gosu types. The latest version is 0.10.2, released on August 2013.

QWERTY QWERTY

This is a list of characters that appear in the animated series VeggieTales.

The Morlocks are a group of several fictional comic book mutants associated with the X-Men in the Marvel Comics universe. Created by writer Chris Claremont and artist Paul Smith, they were named after the subterranean race of the same name in H. G. Wells' novel The Time Machine. They first appeared as a group in Uncanny X-Men #169 (May 1983). (Caliban appeared prior to that (in Uncanny X-Men #148), but he was not identified at that point as part of a larger Morlock civilization.)

Due to a series of tragedies, the original Morlocks no longer reside in subterranean New York (except Marrow, who was one of the original Morlocks as a child), although a violent splinter cell Gene Nation and a comparable group called Those Who Live in Darkness have emerged. Similar groups, called Morlocks by readers and/or the X-Men themselves, have appeared under Chicago and London.

QWERTY (disambiguation)
Keyboard layout

A keyboard layout is any specific mechanical, visual, or functional arrangement of the keys, legends, or key-meaning associations (respectively) of a computer, typewriter, or other typographic keyboard.

For an interactive, side-by-side comparison of various keyboard layouts, go to Microsoft's "Windows Keyboard Layouts" page.

Qwerty Films is a British film production company, set up by Michael Kuhn in 1999.

6600 Qwerty is a main belt asteroid with an orbital period of 1237.2116562 days (3.39 years).

The asteroid was discovered on August 17, 1988. It is a large c-type asteroid

QWERTY Tummy is a term denoted for the unusual phenomenon of an upset stomach that comes from the use of filthy keyboards and in more recent times, from the use of mobile phones' keypads.

QWERTY Tummy was first coined by British consumers group Which? in the context of its study on office hygiene. A survey and chemical analysis of 33 keyboards by scientific experts found among other susbstances, food poisoning bugs such as e-coli and staphylococcus, comparing the results to those found on lavatory seats and door handles. The findings, according to the experts were supposedly identical to offices all over Britain with some keyboards harboring 150 times the acceptable limit that a human can endure and five times more bacteria than lavatory seats.


Dvorak Simplified Keyboard

The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (Listeni/d(ə)ˈvɔræk/ d-VOR-ak) is a keyboard layout patented in 1936 by Dr. August Dvorak and his brother-in-law, Dr. William Dealey. Over the years several slight variations were designed by the team led by Dvorak or by ANSI. These variations have been collectively or individually also called the Simplified Keyboard or American Simplified Keyboard but they all have come to be commonly known as the Dvorak keyboard or Dvorak layout. Dvorak proponents claim the Dvorak layout uses less finger motion, increases typing rate, and reduces errors compared to the standard QWERTY keyboard. This reduction in finger distance traveled is claimed to permit faster rates of typing while reducing repetitive strain injuries, though this has been called into question.

Although the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (DSK) has failed to replace the QWERTY keyboard, most major modern operating systems (such as Windows, OS X, Linux, and BSD) allow a user to switch to the Dvorak layout.

There are also keyboard layouts that do not resemble QWERTY very closely, if at all. These are designed to reduce finger movement and are claimed by some proponents to offer higher typing speed along with ergonomic benefits.

The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard (DSK) is the best-known alternative to QWERTY, also known as the American Simplified Keyboard, ASK layout. It was named after its inventor, August Dvorak. There are also numerous adaptations for languages other than English, and single-handed variants. Dvorak's original layout had the numerals rearranged, but the present-day layout has them in numerical order. The Dvorak Simplified Keyboard has numerous properties designed to increase typing speed, decrease errors, and increase comfort, though studies have failed to verify any benefit to using the keyboard layout. The most prominent property involves concentrating the most used English letters in the home row where the fingers rest, thus having 70% of typing done in the home row (compared to 32% in QWERTY).


Samsung mobile phones

Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. (Korean: 삼성전자) is a South Korean multinational electronics company headquartered in Suwon, South Korea. It is the flagship subsidiary of the Samsung Group and has been the world's largest information technology company by revenues since 2009. Samsung Electronics has assembly plants and sales networks in 88 countries and employs around 370,000 people. For 2012 the CEO is Kwon Oh-Hyun.

Samsung has long been a major manufacturer of electronic components such as lithium-ion batteries, semiconductors, chips, flash memory and hard drive devices for clients such as Apple, Sony, HTC and Nokia.

The Samsung SGH-A767, more commonly known as the Samsung Propel, is a mobile phone by Samsung Telecommunications. It features a full QWERTY keyboard that slides out from under the phone. It comes in white, blue, red, and green, and is one of AT&T's most popular cell phones. It was designed as a quick texting phone along with the Pantech Matrix, the Pantech Slate, and the UT Starcom Quickfire.

The Samsung SGH-A767's QWERTY keyboard makes texting and any other task that requires using letters, numbers, and symbols, much easier and faster to complete. However, the size of the keyboard can be a drawback for people with large hands because the keys are flush mounted and close to each other. Another downside is the screen resolution, which only has 65,000 colors. Along with the standard features of most phones, the Samsung SGH-A767 has GPS capability, with both audible and visual aide which is Java based. It is, however, a separately licensed product, requiring both downloading the program and paying extra for data services.

The Samsung Gravity series of mobile phones includes:


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cellular telephone

A mobile phone (also known as a cellular phone, cell phone, and a hand phone) is a device that can make and receive telephone calls over a radio link while moving around a wide geographic area. It does so by connecting to a cellular network provided by a mobile phone operator, allowing access to the public telephone network. By contrast, a cordless telephone is used only within the short range of a single, private base station.

In addition to telephony, modern mobile phones also support a wide variety of other services such as text messaging, MMS, email, Internet access, short-range wireless communications (infrared, Bluetooth), business applications, gaming and photography. Mobile phones that offer these and more general computing capabilities are referred to as smartphones.

Samsung
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