Question:

How did the Gobys get into Lake Michigan near Wisconsin?

Answer:

Originally the round goby and the tubenose goby were introduced into the St. Claire River in 1990, probably via contaminated ballast water of transoceanic ships.

More Info:

Lake Michigan is one of the five Great Lakes of North America and the only one located entirely within the United States. The other four Great Lakes are shared by the U.S. and Canada. It is the second largest of the Great Lakes by volume and the third largest by surface area, after Lake Superior and Lake Huron (and is slightly smaller than the U.S. state of West Virginia). To the east, its basin is conjoined with that of Lake Huron through the wide Straits of Mackinac, giving it the same surface elevation as its easterly counterpart; the two are technically a single lake. Lake Michigan is bounded, from west to east, by the U.S. states of Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. The word "Michigan" originally referred to the lake itself, and is believed to come from the Ojibwa word mishigami meaning "great water".

Wisconsin goby

Proterorhinus is a genus of gobies native to Eurasia where they occur in the region of the Caspian and Black seas, inhabiting marine, brackish and fresh waters.

There are currently five recognized species in this genus:

Ballast is used in sailboats to provide moment to resist the lateral forces on the sail. Insufficiently ballasted boats will tend to tip, or heel, excessively in high winds. Too much heel may result in the boat capsizing. If a sailing vessel should need to voyage without cargo then ballast of little or no value would be loaded to keep the vessel upright. Some or all of this ballast would then be discarded when cargo was loaded.

Fish

Michigan consists of two peninsulas that lie between 82°30' to about 90°30' west longitude, and are separated by the Straits of Mackinac, and some nearby islands. With the exception of two small areas that are drained by the Mississippi River by way of the Wisconsin River in the Upper Peninsula and by way of the Kankakee-Illinois River in the Lower Peninsula, Michigan is drained by the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence watershed and is the only state with the majority of its land thus drained.

The Great Lakes that border Michigan from east to west are Lake Erie, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan, and Lake Superior. Because of the lakes, Michigan has more lighthouses than any other state.]citation needed[ The state is bounded on the south by the states of Ohio and Indiana, sharing land and water boundaries with both.

Perciformes

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Benthophilinae is a subfamily of gobies, which are endemic to the Ponto-Caspian region (including the Marmara, Black, Azov, Caspian, and Aral seas). The representatives of the subfamily have fused pelvic fins and elongated dorsal and anal fins. They are distinguished from the closely related subfamily Gobiinae by the absence of a swimbladder in adults and location of the uppermost rays of the pectoral fins within the fin membrane.

Proterorhinus is a genus of gobies native to Eurasia where they occur in the region of the Caspian and Black seas, inhabiting marine, brackish and fresh waters.

There are currently five recognized species in this genus:

Neogobius is a genus of goby native to Eurasia.

There are currently four recognized species in this genus:

The round goby, Neogobius melanostomus, is an euryhaline bottom-dwelling goby of the family Gobiidae, native to central Eurasia including the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea.


Caspian tubenose goby

Proterorhinus semilunaris, the western tubenose goby, is a species of goby native to fresh waters of the Black Sea and Aegean Sea basins. This species was considered as a junior synonym of (P. marmoratus) but it was confirmed as a full species based on molecular analysis.

Disaster Accident Environment Claire River Michigan

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