Question:

How accurate are pregnancy tests before the first missed period?

Answer:

The amount of hCG or pregnancy hormone in your urine increases with time. The earlier you take it, the less accurate it will be.

More Info:

hormone Medicine Biology Obstetrics
Human reproduction

Human reproduction is any form of sexual reproduction resulting in the conception of a child, typically involving sexual intercourse between a man and a woman. During sexual intercourse, the interaction between the male and female reproductive systems results in fertilization of the woman's ovum by the man's sperm, which after a gestation period is followed by childbirth. The fertilization of the ovum may nowadays be achieved by artificial insemination methods, which do not involve sexual intercourse.

Fertility
Pregnancy test

A pregnancy test attempts to determine whether a woman is pregnant. Markers that indicate pregnancy are found in urine and blood, and pregnancy tests require sampling one of these substances. The first of these markers to be discovered, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), was discovered in 1930 to be produced by the trophoblast cells of the fertilised ova (eggs). While hCG is a reliable marker of pregnancy, it cannot be detected until after implantation: this results in false negatives if the test is performed during the very early stages of pregnancy. Obstetric ultrasonography may also be used to detect pregnancy. Obstetric ultrasonography was first practiced in the 1960s; the first home test kit for hCG was invented in 1968 by Margaret Crane in New York. She was granted two U.S. patents: 3,579,306 and 215,774. The kits went on the market in the United States and Europe in the mid-1970s.

Glycoproteins
Peptide hormones

Peptide hormones are proteins that have endocrine functions in living animals.

Like other proteins, peptide hormones are synthesized in cells from amino acids according to mRNA transcripts, which are synthesized from DNA templates inside the cell nucleus. Preprohormones, peptide hormone precursors, are then processed in several stages, typically in the endoplasmic reticulum, including removal of the N-terminal signal sequence and sometimes glycosylation, resulting in prohormones. The prohormones are then packaged into membrane-bound secretory vesicles, which can be secreted from the cell by exocytosis in response to specific stimuli (e.g. --an increase in Ca2+ and cAMP concentration in cytoplasm).

Pregnancy Urine
Human chorionic gonadotropin

In molecular biology, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a hormone produced by the syncytiotrophoblast, a component of the fertilized egg, after conception. Following implantation, the syncytiotrophoblast gives rise to the placenta. Some cancerous tumors produce this hormone; therefore, elevated levels measured when the patient is not pregnant can lead to a cancer diagnosis. However, it is not known whether this production is a contributing cause or an effect of tumorigenesis. The pituitary analogue of hCG, known as luteinizing hormone (LH), is produced in the pituitary gland of males and females of all ages. As of December 6, 2011 (2011-12-06)[update], the United States FDA has prohibited the sale of "homeopathic" and over the counter hCG diet products and declared them fraudulent and illegal.

hCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin) is a hormone secreted in pregnancy that is made by the developing embryo soon after conception and later by the syncytiotrophoblast (part of the placenta) to maintain the fetal viability preventing the disintegration of the corpus luteum of the ovary and thereby maintaining progesterone production that is critical for a pregnancy in humans; it also affects the immune tolerance of the pregnancy. .

hCG is excreted in the urine of pregnant women. Detection of this hormone in urine or serum is an easy first method of diagnosis of pregnancy. The hormone can be detected as early as the sixth day after conception. hCG is also an important tumor marker because it is produced by some kinds of tumor, such as: seminoma, choriocarcinoma, germ cell tumors, hydatidiform mole formation, teratoma with elements of choriocarcinoma, and

Science of drugs including their origin, composition, pharmacokinetics,
pharmacodynamics, therapeutic use, and toxicology.

Pharmacology (from Greek φάρμακον, pharmakon, "poison" in classic Greek; "drug" in modern Greek; and -λογία, -logia "study of", "knowledge of") is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (within the body) molecule which exerts a biochemical and/or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism. More specifically, it is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals.

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