Question:

Don't you have to be allergic to poison ivy in order to to be affected by it?

Answer:

Most people have some level of sensitivity to poison ivy and similar toxic plants, such as poison oak and poison sumac.

More Info:

Toxicodendron Biology Medicine Botany Vines

Medicinal plants have been identified and used throughout human history. Toxic plants even have use in pharmaceutical development. Angiosperms (flowering plants) were the original source of most plant medicines. Some herbs and spices come from flowering plants.

Topics concerning medicinal plants include:

Allergology

The Flora of North America North of Mexico (usually referred to as FNA) is a multivolume work describing the native plants of North America. Much of the Flora is already available online. It is expected to fill 30 volumes when completed, and will be the first work to treat all of the known flora north of Mexico.

It is a collaboration of over 800 authors, who collaborate over the web.

Toxicodendron radicans, commonly known as poison ivy (older synonyms are Rhus toxicodendron and Rhus radicans), is a poisonous North American and Asian plant that is well known for its production of urushiol, a clear liquid compound found within the sap of the plant that causes an itching, irritation and sometimes painful rash in most people who touch it. The plant is not a true ivy (Hedera).

Poison ivy can be found growing in any of the following forms:

Toxicodendron vernix, commonly known as Poison sumac, is a woody shrub or small tree growing to 9 m (30 ft) tall. It was previously known as Rhus vernix. All parts of the plant contain a resin called urushiol that causes skin and mucous membrane irritation to humans. When burned, inhalation of the smoke may cause the rash to appear on the lining of the lungs, causing extreme pain and possibly fatal respiratory difficulty.

Toxicodendron radicans, commonly known as poison ivy (older synonyms are Rhus toxicodendron and Rhus radicans), is a poisonous North American and Asian plant that is well known for its production of urushiol, a clear liquid compound found within the sap of the plant that causes an itching, irritation and sometimes painful rash in most people who touch it. The plant is not a true ivy (Hedera).

Poison ivy can be found growing in any of the following forms:

Ivy Environment
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