Question:

Did Paul Revere say the red coats are coming or the british are coming?

Answer:

Paul Revere said "The redcoats are coming!" Thank you for asking AnswerParty!

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Paul Revere (/rɪˈvɪər/; December 21, 1734 O.S. – May 10, 1818) was an American silversmith, early industrialist, and a patriot in the American Revolution. He is most famous for alerting the Colonial militia to the approach of British forces before the battles of Lexington and Concord, as dramatized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem, "Paul Revere's Ride."

Revere was a prosperous and prominent Boston silversmith, who helped organize an intelligence and alarm system to keep watch on the British military. Revere later served as a Massachusetts militia officer, though his service culminated after the Penobscot Expedition, one of the most disastrous campaigns of the American Revolutionary War, for which he was absolved of blame. Following the war, Revere returned to his silversmith trade and used the profits from his expanding business to finance his work in iron casting, bronze bell and cannon casting, and the forging of copper bolts and spikes. Finally in 1800 he became the first American to successfully roll copper into sheets for use as sheathing on naval vessels.

Foundrymen

Revere is a city in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, United States, located approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) from downtown Boston. It is named after the American Revolutionary War patriot Paul Revere. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city has a population of 51,755 inhabitants.

Revere borders the towns of Winthrop, East Boston and Chelsea to the south, Everett and Malden to the west, Saugus and Lynn to the north, and the Atlantic Ocean to the east. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 10 square miles (26 km2), of which, 5.9 square miles (15 km2) of it is land and 4.1 square miles (11 km2) of it (40.98%) is water.

Redcoat is the name given to frontline staff at Butlins holiday camps in the UK. A Redcoat has duties ranging from adult entertainer or children's entertainer to stewarding.

Massachusetts

In this article, inhabitants of the Thirteen Colonies of British America that supported the American Revolution are primarily referred to as "Americans," with occasional references to "Patriots," "Whigs," "Rebels" or "Revolutionaries." Colonists who supported the British in opposing the Revolution are usually referred to as "Loyalists" or "Tories." The geographical area of the thirteen colonies is often referred to simply as "America".

The American Revolution was a political upheaval during the last half of the 18th century in which thirteen colonies in North America joined together to break from the British Empire, combining to become the United States of America. They first rejected the authority of the Parliament of Great Britain to govern them without elected representation, and then expelled all royal officials. By 1774 each colony had established a Provincial Congress or an equivalent governmental institution to govern itself, but still recognized the British Crown and their inclusion in the empire. The British responded by sending combat troops to re-establish royalist control. Through the Second Continental Congress, the Americans then managed the armed conflict in response to the British known as the American Revolutionary War (also: American War of Independence, 1775–83).

Shadow Fox is a historical fiction series published by Fox Run Press. The first book in the series is titled Shadow Fox: Sons of Liberty. The 2010 children's novel by Ron Hardman and Jessica Hardman tells the story of Paul Revere's Midnight Ride at the start of the American Revolution. The novel's themes include liberty, freedom, loyalty, and the explosive tension between the Sons of Liberty and British Redcoats as the American Revolution begins.

Real events described in the novel include Nikola Tesla's experiments at his 1899 laboratory in Colorado, the midnight ride of Paul Revere, and the Battles of Lexington and Concord.

Great Moments in History was a dramatic radio series broadcast on NBC in 1927-28. It offered recreations of famed historical situations.

The program was the creation of actor-director Gerald Stoop, a New York Theater Guild member, and playwright Henry Fisk Carlton, an English instructor at New York University and a graduate of Harvard's Dramatic Work Shop. Carlton was previously involved in the production of other NBC programs, including Re-told Tales and House of Myths.

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