Question:

Did Michigan State or Indiana University win the basketball game last night?

Answer:

Michigan State claimed its first Big Ten championship since 2001 with a 64-59 victory over Indiana at Assembly Hall.

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Sports in the United States

Sports are an important part of the culture of the United States. Four of the nation's five most popular team sports were developed in North America: American football, basketball, baseball and ice hockey, whereas soccer was developed in England. The four Major leagues in the United States are the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL); all enjoy massive media exposure and are considered the preeminent competitions in their respective sports in the world. Three of those leagues have teams that represent Canadian cities, and all four are among the most lucrative sports leagues in the world. The top professional soccer league in the United States, Major League Soccer, has not yet reached the popularity levels of the top four sports leagues, although average attendance has been increasing and in fact has matched or surpassed those of the NBA and the NHL.

Professional teams in all major sports operate as franchises within a league. All major sports leagues use the same type of schedule with a playoff tournament after the regular season ends. In addition to the major league-level organizations, several sports also have professional minor leagues, active in smaller cities across the country.


National Basketball Association

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the pre-eminent men's professional basketball league in North America, and is widely considered to be the premier men's professional basketball league in the world. It has thirty franchised member clubs (29 in the United States and 1 in Canada), and is an active member of USA Basketball (USAB), which is recognized by FIBA (also known as the International Basketball Federation) as the national governing body for basketball in the United States. The NBA is one of the four major North American professional sports leagues. NBA players are the world's best paid sportsmen, by average annual salary per player.

The league was founded in New York City on June 6, 1946, as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The league adopted the name National Basketball Association on August 3, 1949, after absorbing the rival National Basketball League (NBL). The league's several international as well as individual team offices are directed out of its head offices located in the Olympic Tower at 645 Fifth Avenue in New York City. NBA Entertainment and NBA TV studios are directed out of offices located in Secaucus, New Jersey.


Big Ten Conference

The Big Ten Conference (B1G), formerly Western Conference and Big Nine Conference, is the oldest Division I collegiate athletic conference in the United States. Its twelve member institutions (which are primarily flagship research universities in their respective states, well-regarded academically, and with relatively large student enrollment) are located primarily in the Midwest, stretching from Nebraska in the west to Pennsylvania in the east. The conference competes in the NCAA's Division I; its football teams compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, the highest level of NCAA competition in that sport. Member schools of the Big Ten (or, in two cases, their parent university systems) also are members of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, a leading educational and research consortium.

Despite the conference's name, the Big Ten actually consists of 12 schools, following the addition of Pennsylvania State University in 1993 and the University of Nebraska–Lincoln in 2011. In 2014, the conference will expand to 14 full members with the additions of the University of Maryland, College Park and Rutgers University, and one affiliate member with the addition of Johns Hopkins University in men's lacrosse. It is not to be confused with the Big 12 Conference, which has ten schools and represents a different region of the country, save for the state of Iowa.


Park Ridge, Illinois

Park Ridge is an affluent Chicago suburb with a population at the 2010 census of 37,480 residents. It is located 15 miles (24 km) northwest of downtown Chicago. It is close to O'Hare International Airport, major expressways, and rail transportation. It is a part of the Chicago metropolitan area, bordering two northwestern neighborhoods of Chicago's Far North Side (Edison Park and Norwood Park).

As its name suggests, Park Ridge lies on a ridge. The soil is abundant with clay deposits, which made it a brick-making center for the developing city of Chicago. Park Ridge was originally called Pennyville to honor George Penny, the businessman who owned the local brickyard along with Robert Meacham. Later it was named Brickton. The Des Plaines River divides Park Ridge from neighboring Des Plaines, which is west of Park Ridge. Chicago is south and east of Park Ridge, and Niles and unincorporated Maine Township are to its north.

Indiana
Shooting guards

The shooting guard (SG), also known as the two or off guard, is one of five traditional positions on a basketball team. Players of the position are often shorter, leaner, and quicker than forwards. A shooting guard's main objective is to score points for his team. Some teams ask their shooting guards to bring up the ball as well; these players are known colloquially as combo guards. Kobe Bryant, for example, is a shooting guard who is as good a playmaker as he is a scorer; other examples of combo guards are Jamal Crawford, Allen Iverson, Dwyane Wade, Tyreke Evans, and Jason Terry. A player who can switch between playing shooting guard and small forward is known as a swingman. Notable swing men (also known as wing players) include Paul Pierce, Evan Turner, Stephen Jackson, and Tracy McGrady, also Rudy Fernández having an under average size for small forward.

Notable shooting guards include current NBA players Kobe Bryant, Dwyane Wade, Ray Allen, Manu Ginóbili, Vince Carter, Joe Johnson, Richard Hamilton, James Harden, Paul George, Monta Ellis, Tracy McGrady and former players Michael Jordan, Clyde Drexler, Sam Jones, Earl Monroe, Reggie Miller, Allen Iverson, Joe Dumars and Jerry West.

Tom Crean

Calbert Nathaniel Cheaney (born July 17, 1971 in Evansville, Indiana) is a retired basketball player and an assistant coach at Saint Louis University. At the conclusion of his collegiate basketball career, he was the all-time leading scorer of both Indiana and the Big Ten and had captured virtually every post-season honor available. During a thirteen-year NBA career, Cheaney played for five different teams, averaging 9.5 points and 3.2 rebounds.

Sports
Indiana University

Bloomington, Indiana

Indiana University (IU) is a multi-campus public university system in the state of Indiana, United States. Indiana University has a combined student body of more than 110,000 students, including approximately 43,000 students enrolled at the Indiana University Bloomington campus and approximately 31,000 students enrolled at the Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) campus.


Assembly Hall

An assembly hall is traditionally a building used for the purposes of holding deliberative assemblies. An example is the Assembly Hall (Washington, Mississippi) where the general assembly of the state of Mississippi was held. Some Christian denominations call their meeting places or places of worship, assembly halls, such as the Salt Lake Assembly Hall. Elders and ministers of Presbyterian churches gather in assembly halls for their general assembly, such as in the General Assembly Hall of the Church of Scotland.

On the campuses of colleges and universities in the United States, assembly halls are sometimes found in multi-purpose athletic buildings, where they share other uses, including as basketball courts. Examples are Assembly Hall (Bloomington) and Assembly Hall (Champaign).

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