Question:

Did kansas win their game?

Answer:

Kansas defeated Kansas State today, February 14. The final score was 85-74. Cole Aldrich was 8-13 with 21 points.

More Info:

Kansas City is the third-largest city in the state of Kansas, the county seat of Wyandotte County, and the third-largest city of the Kansas City metropolitan area. It is part of a consolidated city-county government known as the "Unified Government". Wyandotte County also includes the independent cities of Bonner Springs and Edwardsville. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 145,786. It is situated at Kaw Point, which is the junction of the Missouri and Kansas rivers. It is commonly referred to as "KCK" to differentiate it from Kansas City, Missouri (which is often referred to as "KCMO" or simply "Kansas City"). Kansas City, formed in 1868 and incorporated in October 1872. The first city election was held October 22, 1872, by order of Judge Hiram Stevens of the Tenth Judicial District, and resulted in the election of Mayor James Boyle. The mayors of the city after its organization have been James Boyle, C. A. Eidemiller, A. S. Orbison, Eli Teed and Samuel McConnell. John Sheehan was appointed Marshal in 1875, by Mayor Eli Teed. He was also Chief of Police, having a force of five men. In June 1880, the Governor of Kansas proclaimed the city of Kansas City a city of the second class with the Mayor Samuel McConnell present. James E. Porter was Mayor in 1910. It was one of the nation's 100 largest cities for many US Census counts, from 1890 to 1960, including 1920, when it had over 100,000 residents for the first time. In 1997, voters approved a proposition to unify the city and county governments creating the Unified Government of Wyandotte County. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 128.38 square miles (332.50 km2), of which, 124.81 square miles (323.26 km2) is land and 3.57 square miles (9.25 km2) is water. Kansas City, Kansas, is organized into a system of neighborhoods, some with histories as independent cities or the sites of major events. Neighborhoods of Kansas City, Kansas Kansas City is situated in "Tornado Alley", a broad region where cold air from the Rocky Mountains and Canada collides with warm air from the Gulf of Mexico, leading to the formation of powerful storms. The most recent tornado to strike Kansas City was in May 2003. The region is also prone to ice storms, such as the 2002 ice storm during which hundreds of thousands lost power for days and (in some cases) weeks. The low-lying areas near the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas rivers has been subject to flooding, including the Great Flood of 1993 and the Great Flood of 1951. As of the census of 2010, there were 145,786 people, 53,925 households, and 35,112 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,168.1 inhabitants per square mile (451.0 /km2). There were 61,969 housing units at an average density of 496.5 per square mile (191.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 52.2% White, 26.8% African American, 0.8% Native American, 2.7% Asian (Hmong 32%, Burmese 13%, Laotian 11%, Asian Indian 9%, Chinese 7%, Filipino 6%, Vietnamese 6% accounted for the majority of the total Asian Population), 0.1% Pacific Islander, 13.6% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 27.8% of the population. Non-Hispanic Whites were 40.2% of the population in 2010, down from 76.3% in 1970. There were 53,925 households of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.1% were married couples living together, 18.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.9% were non-families. 28.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.32. The median age in the city was 32.5 years. 28.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.7% were from 25 to 44; 23.7% were from 45 to 64; and 10.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.4% male and 50.6% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 146,866 people, 55,500 households, and 36,241 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,181.9 people per square mile (456.3/km²). There were 61,446 housing units at an average density of 494.5 per square mile (190.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 55.7% White, 30.12% African American, 0.75% Native American, 1.72% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 8.61% from other races, and 2.99% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 16.78% of the population. There were 55,500 households out of which 32.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.2% were married couples living together, 18.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.25. In the city the population was spread out with 28.6% under the age of 18, 10.6% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.7 males. As of 2000 the median income for a household in the city was $33,011, and the median income for a family was $39,491. Males had a median income of $30,992 versus $24,543 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,737. About 13.0% of families and 17.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.8% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over. Federal Bureau of Labor Statistics shows employment in Wyandotte County, Kansas increased 4% from March 2011 to March 2012. The sharp rise in the number of people going to work puts Wyandotte County number 19th in the nation and 1st in the Kansas City metro for job growth as of September 28, 2012. Kansas City, Kansas is the home to the General Motors Fairfax Assembly Plant, which manufactures the Chevrolet Malibu and the Buick LaCrosse. The Federal Bureau of Prisons North Central Region Office is in Kansas City, Kansas. In addition Associated Wholesale Grocers and Kansas City Steak Company are based within the city. Village West, located at the intersection of Interstates 70 and 435. Anchored by the Kansas Speedway, tenants include Hollywood Casino, The Legends At Village West, Cabela's, Nebraska Furniture Mart, Great Wolf Lodge, CommunityAmerica Ballpark, home to the Kansas City T-Bones of the American Association, and Sporting Park, home of Sporting Kansas City of Major League Soccer. Schlitterbahn Vacation Village, a 370-acre (1.5 km2) resort and waterpark, opened across I-435 from Village West in June 2009. An Online Trading Academy center is also located in Kansas. Kansas City was ranked the #7 best city in the U.S. to start over after foreclosure. Average rent in Kansas City is only $788, which is low in relation to the national average of $1087 spent on rent. On March 30, 2011, Google announced that Kansas City had been selected as the site of an experimental fiber-optic network that Google will build at no cost to the city. Kansas City was chosen from a field of 1,100 US communities that had applied for the network. Google plans to have the network in operation by 2012. Piper, Kansas became the first full community in the nation (based off actual residential votes and pre-registration counts) to have residential broadband internet network infrastructures using fiber-optic communication of 1Gbit/sec download and upload speeds provided by Google Fiber. According to the City's 2010 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the largest employers in the city are: Kansas City, Kansas is also home to a library system, with 5 branch libraries spread throughout Wyandotte County. These include the Main Library, South Branch Library, Turner Community Library, West Wyandotte Library and in Wyandotte County Lake Park, the Mr. & Mrs. F.L. Schlagle Library. Kansas City, Kansas has a consolidated city-county government in which the city and county have been merged into one jurisdiction. As such, it is simultaneously a city, which is a municipal corporation; and a county, which is an administrative division of a state. The Kansas City, Kansas Police Department was founded in 1898. In 1914. By 1918, it was taking photographs and fingerprints of all the felons it arrested. The Kansas City, Kansas Fire Department was founded on December 25, 1883. The fire department is part of the Firefighter's Relief Association which was founded February 28, 1918. The department has 18 fire stations in the city. They cover an area of approximately 127 square miles. They also have specialty teams including heavy rescue, hazardous materials, foam team, water rescue, tactical medic, trench rescue, high angle/rope rescue, and technical urban search and rescue. The fire department has four public service programs. The programs are citizens assist program, fire prevention, safe place, and the smoke detector program. Mayor/CEO
– Joe Reardon Board of Commissioners
– At-Large District 1, Mayor Pro Tem, Rev Mark Holland
– At-Large District 2, John J. Mendez
– District 1, Nathaniel Barnes
– District 2, Brian McKiernan
– District 3, Ann Brandau-Murguia
– District 4, Tarence Maddox
– District 5, Mike Kane
– District 6, Angela Markley
– District 7, Thomas R. Cooley
– District 8, Benoyd M. Ellison Of the statistics available in 2000 based on data collected by the FBI as part of its Uniform Crime Reporting Program, which represent from arrests made by State and local law enforcement agencies as reported to the FBI, there were a total of 696 incidents. River transportation was important to early Kansas City, Kansas as its location at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers afforded easy access to trade. A portion of I-70 was the first project in the United States completed under the provisions of the new Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 (though not the first constructed or begun.) ads There are a number of buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Kansas City, Kansas is home to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, which covers 12,500 square miles (32,000 km2) in eastern Kansas. Memorial Hall is a 3,500-seat indoor arena/auditorium located in downtown Kansas City, Kansas. The venue, which has a permanent stage, is used for public assemblies, concerts and sporting events. In 1887, John G. Braecklein constructed a Victorian home for John and Margaret Scroggs in the area of Strawberry Hill. It is a fine example of the Queen Anne Style architecture erected in Kansas City, Kansas. The Rosedale Arch, dedicated to the men of Kansas City, Kansas who served in World War I, is a small-scale replica of France's famous Arc de Triomphe. It is located on Mount Marty in Rosedale, overlooking the intersection of Rainbow and Southwest boulevards. Wyandotte High School is a notable public school building located at 2501 Minnesota Avenue. Built in 1936 as a Works Progress Administration project, the school was later designated as a Kansas City, Kansas Historic Landmark in 1985 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 30, 1986. Kansas City, Kansas is a portion of the Kansas City, Missouri media market. The Kansas City, Missouri metro area's media market includes ten television channels along with 30 FM and 21 AM radio stations. KCK residents receive broadcasts from the following stations: The city is home to one major professional sports team, Major League Soccer's Sporting Kansas City (known as the Wizards from 1996–2010). Additionally Kansas City is home to a minor league baseball club, the Kansas City T-Bones who play in the American Association. The Kansas Speedway is also located in the city. Kansas Speedway is an auto racetrack adjacent to the Village West area in western Wyandotte County, Kansas. The speedway, which is used by the NASCAR Sprint Cup series and other racing series, is a 1.5 miles (2.4 km) tri-oval with 15-degree banking in the turns. The track held its first race on June 2, 2001, when the Winston West series contested the Kansas 100. The top-level NASCAR Sprint Cup series holds the annual Hollywood Casino 400 at the track. The IZOD IndyCar Series previously had run the RoadRunner Turbo Indy 300 from 2001 to 2010; with IndyCar driver Scott Dixon setting the overall lap record for all series. The Kansas City T-Bones are a professional baseball team that moved to Kansas City, Kansas in 2003. The T-Bones were members of the Northern League, which is not affiliated with Major League Baseball, until the dissolution of the Northern League following the 2010 season. While the remaining Northern League teams entered the North American League as part of the Northern League's merger with the Golden Baseball League and United Baseball League, the T-Bones joined many former Northern League teams in the relatively new American Association of Independent Professional Baseball. From the 2003 season to the present, the T-Bones have played their home games at CommunityAmerica Ballpark, located adjacent to the Village West development in western Wyandotte County, Kansas. The T-Bones were the 2008 Northern League Champions. Sporting Kansas City is a Major League Soccer team that currently plays at Sporting Park. The team originally planned to move to a new stadium in Kansas City, Missouri in 2011, but the project fell through in 2009. The developer of the planned venue moved the project to the Village West area, near CommunityAmerica Ballpark, and received the needed approvals in January 2010. Kansas City has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:
Manhattan is a city located in the northeastern part of the state of Kansas in the United States, at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. It is the county seat of Riley County and the city extends into Pottawatomie County. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 52,281. It is the principal city of the Manhattan, Kansas Metropolitan Statistical Area – with an estimated population of 113,629, the Manhattan MSA is the fourth largest metropolitan area in the state. Nicknamed "The Little Apple" as a play on New York City's "Big Apple", it is best known as being the home of Kansas State University and has a college town atmosphere. Eight miles (13 km) west of the city is Fort Riley, a United States Army post. Manhattan is also known as Titletown USA thanks largely in part to the 2012-2013 athletic season for the Kansas State University Wildcats. In 2007, CNN and Money magazine rated Manhattan as one of the ten best places in America to retire young. The town was named an All-American City in 1952, becoming the first city in Kansas to win the award. In 2011, Forbes rated Manhattan No. 1 for "Best Small Communities for a Business and Career." Before settlement by European-Americans in the 1850s, the land where Manhattan currently sits was long home to Native American tribes. Most recently, from 1780 to 1830 it was home to the Kaw people (also known as the Kansa). The Kaw settlement was called Blue Earth Village (Manyinkatuhuudje). It was named after the river the tribe called the Great Blue Earth River – today known as the Big Blue River – which intersected with the Kansas River by their village. Blue Earth Village was the site of a large battle between the Kaw and the Pawnee in 1812. The Kansas-Nebraska Act opened the territory to settlement by U.S. citizens in 1854. That fall, George S. Park founded the first Euro-American settlement within the borders of the current Manhattan. Park named it Polistra (some histories refer to it as Poliska or Poleska). Later that same year, Samuel D. Houston, Martin F. Conway, and three other pioneers founded a neighboring community near the mouth of the Big Blue River that they named Canton. Neither Canton nor Polistra ever grew to include anyone beyond their original founders. In March 1855, a group of New England Free-Staters traveled to Kansas Territory under the auspices of the New England Emigrant Aid Company to found a Free-State town. Led by Isaac Goodnow, the first members of the group (with the help of Samuel C. Pomeroy) selected the location of the Polistra and Canton claims for the Aid Company's new settlement. Soon after the New Englanders arrived at the site, in April 1855, they agreed to join together with Canton and Polistra to make one settlement named Boston. They were soon joined by dozens more New Englanders, including Goodnow's brother-in-law Joseph Denison. In June 1855, the paddle steamer Hartford, carrying 75 settlers from Ohio, ran aground in the Kansas River near the settlement. The Ohio settlers, who were members of the Cincinnati-Manhattan Company, had been headed twenty miles (32 km) further upstream to the headwaters of the Kansas River, the location today of Junction City. After realizing they were stranded, the Hartford passengers accepted an invitation to join the new town, but insisted that it be renamed Manhattan, which was done on June 29, 1855. Manhattan was incorporated on May 30, 1857. Early Manhattan settlers sometimes found themselves in conflict with Native Americans and the town itself was threatened by pro-slavery Southerners, but the proximity of Fort Riley protected the settlement from the major violence visited upon other Free-State towns during the "Bleeding Kansas" era. The young city received an early boost when gold was discovered in the Rocky Mountains in 1859 and Fifty-Niners began to stream through Manhattan on their way to prospect in the mountains. Manhattan was one of the last significant settlements on the route west, and the village's merchants did a brisk business selling supplies to miners. At the same time, Manhattan was fast becoming a center of education. In 1858, the Territorial Legislature chartered a Methodist college in Manhattan, named Blue Mont Central College. In 1861, when the State of Kansas entered the Union, Isaac Goodnow, who had been a teacher in Rhode Island, began lobbying the legislature to convert Blue Mont Central College into the state university. The culmination of these efforts came on February 16, 1863, when the Kansas legislature established Kansas State Agricultural College (now Kansas State University) in Manhattan. By the time the Kansas Pacific Railroad laid its tracks west through Manhattan in 1866, the 11-year-old settlement was permanently ensconced in the tallgrass prairie. Manhattan has steadily increased in population every decade since its founding. Manhattan is located at (39.190142, −96.586818), or about 50 miles (80 km) west of Topeka on the Kansas River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 18.79 square miles (48.67 km2), of which, 18.76 square miles (48.59 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water. Manhattan is located in the Flint Hills region of Kansas, which consists of continuous rolling hills covered in tall grasses. However, the current downtown area – the original site of Manhattan – was built on a broad, flat floodplain at the junction of the Kansas and Big Blue rivers. Tuttle Creek Reservoir is located 5 miles (8 km) north of Manhattan. The lake was formed when the Big Blue River was dammed for flood control in the 1960s, and it is now a state park that offers many recreational opportunities. South of the city is the Konza Prairie, a tallgrass prairie preserve jointly owned by The Nature Conservancy and Kansas State University. Kansas is not known for earthquake activity, but Manhattan is near the Nemaha Ridge, a long structure that is bounded by several faults, and which is still active. In particular, the Humboldt Fault Zone lies just 12 miles (19 km) eastward of Tuttle Creek Reservoir. On April 24, 1867, the 1867 Manhattan earthquake struck Riley County. Measuring 5.1 on the Richter scale, the earthquake's epicenter was by Manhattan. To this day, it remains the strongest earthquake to originate in Kansas. The earthquake had an intensity of VII on the Mercalli intensity scale, and was felt over an area of roughly 193,051 square miles (500,000 km2). It caused largely minor damage, reports of which were confined to Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri, according to the United States Geological Survey. Despite the fact that Kansas is not seismically active, a strong earthquake could pose significant threats to the state. If an earthquake had occurred along the Nemaha Ridge prior to 2010, it could have destroyed the dam on Tuttle Creek Reservoir, releasing 300,000 feet (91,440 m) of water per second and flooding the nearby area, threatening roughly 13,000 people and 5,900 homes. A study in the 1980s found that a moderate earthquake "between 5.7 to 6.6 would cause sand underneath the dam to liquefy into quicksand, causing the dam to spread out and the top to drop up to three feet." To address this threat, the Army Corps of Engineers completed a project in July 2010 that replaced the sand with more than 350 concrete walls and equipped the dam with sensors. Alarms are connected to these sensors, which would alert nearby citizens to the earthquake. Manhattan lies in the transition between the humid continental (Köppen Dfa) and humid subtropical climate (Köppen Cfa) zones, typically experiencing hot, humid summers and cold, dry winters. The monthly daily average temperature ranges from in January to in July. The high temperature reaches or exceeds an average of 58 days a year and an average of 10 days. The minimum temperature falls to or below on an average 5.3 days a year. Extreme temperatures range from on August 13, 1936 down to on February 12, 1899. On average, Manhattan receives 35.7 inches (907 mm) of precipitation annually, a majority of which occurs from May to August, and records 102 days of measurable precipitation. Measurable snowfall occurs an average of 9.6 days per year with 6.1 days receiving at least 1.0 inch (2.5 cm). Snow depth of at least one inch occurs an average of 22 days a year. Typically, the average window for freezing temperatures is October 12 thru April 21. The state of Kansas falls within an area sometimes called Tornado Alley. The most recent tornado in Manhattan touched down at approximately 10:30 pm on June 11, 2008. Thirty-one homes and several businesses were destroyed by the EF4 tornado. Additionally, Kansas State University's campus incurred about $20 million in damage – a number of university buildings sustained significant damage and the Wind Erosion Laboratory's garage was destroyed by the tornado's winds. No one was killed. Previously, the most destructive tornado to hit Manhattan was on June 8, 1966. The 1966 tornado caused $5 million in damage and injured at least 65 people in Manhattan. Manhattan was built on a floodplain at the junction of the Kansas and Big Blue rivers, and it has faced recurring problems with flooding during times of heavy precipitation. The largest floods in the town's history were the 1903 and 1908 floods, the Great Flood of 1951 and the Great Flood of 1993. As of the census of 2010, there were 52,281 people, 20,008 households, and 9,466 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,786.8 inhabitants per square mile (1,076.0 /km2). There were 21,619 housing units at an average density of 1,152.4 per square mile (444.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 83.5% White, 5.5% African American, 0.5% Native American, 5.1% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 1.7% from other races, and 3.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.8% of the population. There were 20,008 households of which 22.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.0% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 52.7% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.82. The median age in the city was 23.8 years. 15.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 39.1% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24% were from 25 to 44; 14.2% were from 45 to 64; and 7.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 50.9% male and 49.1% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 44,831 people, 16,949 households, and 8,254 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,983.9 people per square mile (1,152.4/km²). There were 17,690 housing units at an average density of 1,177.4 per square mile (454.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 87.28% White, 4.86% African American, 0.48% Native American, 3.93% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 1.30% from other races, and 2.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.49% of the population. There were 16,949 households out of which 22.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.6% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 51.3% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.89. In the city the population was spread out with 15.8% under the age of 18, 39.2% from 18 to 24, 24.0% from 25 to 44, 13.2% from 45 to 64, and 7.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females there were 106.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.4 males. The median income for a household in the city was $30,463, and the median income for a family was $48,289. Males had a median income of $31,396 versus $24,611 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,566. About 8.7% of families and 24.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.1% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over. However, traditional measures of income and poverty can be misleading when applied to cities with high student populations, such as Manhattan. Manhattan is governed under a council-manager system, with a City Commission consisting of five members. Elections are nonpartisan and are held every other year, in odd-numbered years. Three City Commission positions are chosen in each election. The two highest vote recipients receive four-year terms, while the third highest vote recipient receives a two-year term. The highest vote winner in a general election is established to serve as mayor on the third year of a four-year term. The Mayor presides over Commission meetings, but has the same voting rights as other Commissioners and no veto power. As of December 2012, Loren J. Pepperd serves as the city's mayor, while Wynn Butler, Richard (Rich) B. Jankovich, John Matta, and James (Jim) E. Sherow make up the rest of the City Commission. Manhattan is located inside a number of state district boundaries. Most of Manhattan falls within two districts for the Kansas House of Representatives. Representative Tom Phillips (R) serves in District 67, which includes portions of south, west, and northern Riley County. Representative Sydney Carlin (D) represents District 66, which includes most of downtown Manhattan, and the northeastern portions of the city. Small portions of Manhattan extend into other districts to the south and north. Manhattan is the Kansas Senate District 22, and the state senator is Democrat Tom Hawk. Manhattan is located in Kansas's 2nd congressional district, which is represented by Republican Lynn Jenkins. For federal elections, precise breakdowns are unavailable for only Manhattan, but a majority of voters in Riley County have never supported a Democratic candidate for President. Republicans have carried Riley County every presidential election, except for 1912, when a majority of the county's voters supported the Progressive candidate Theodore Roosevelt. As of 2012, with new congressional district drawn, the courts placed Manhattan in Kansas' 1st congressional district, which is represented by Republican, Tim Huelskamp. Manhattan is the site of Kansas State University sporting events, Aggieville, performing arts, lecture series and the annual Country Stampede Music Festival – the largest music festival in Kansas. The Marianna Kistler Beach Museum of Art[1] and the Kansas State University Gardens are located on the campus of Kansas State University. Next to campus is Aggieville, a shopping and retail center with enough bars to satisfy the college crowd. Aggieville is also home to the longest continuously-operating Pizza Hut restaurant in the world. Manhattan's Sunset Zoo is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). Colbert Hills Golf Course, which is annually ranked by Golf Digest among the best in the state, is home to the Earl Woods National Youth Golf Academy and a host site for the First Tee program. Manhattan is also the birthplace of Damon Runyon, the "Inventor of Broadway," and his Manhattan house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The buildings which house The Flint Hills Job Corps Training Center west of the city were once used as a nursing home and orphanage operated by the Fraternal Order of Odd Fellows. The first capitol of the Kansas Territory is preserved nearby, on Fort Riley grounds. The Fort Riley military base covers 100,656 acres (407.34 km2) between Manhattan and Junction City, KS. Since 2006 it has, once again, become home to the Big Red One, the 1st Infantry Division of the United States. As the largest municipality in the Flint Hills region, Manhattan is host to the Flint Hills Discovery Center, a heritage and science center dedicated to the education and preservation of the Flint Hills and the remaining tall grass prairie. Manhattan's economy is heavily based on public entities. Kansas State University is the largest employer in town, and its 23,000 students help support the retail and entertainment venues in the city. The second-largest employer in Manhattan is the city school district. Additionally, many civilians and military personnel employed at nearby Fort Riley also live in Manhattan and support its economy. Large private sector employers in Manhattan include the Mercy Regional Health Center and Farm Bureau. Manhattan also supports a small industrial base. Manufacturing and commercial businesses include: Auth-Florence Manufacturing, GTM Sportswear, ICE Corporation, Manko Windows, CivicPlus, The McCall Pattern Company and Farrar Corporation. Some, like GTM and Farrar have had success in the city – as college towns are known to outlive and sustain economic recessions better than most towns due to their economic base In 2009, the United States Department of Homeland Security announced that it would locate the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) in Manhattan. The NBAF is scheduled to open in 2020, and will be a federal lab to research biological threats involving human, zoonotic (i.e., transmitted from animals to humans) and foreign animal diseases. It is expected to employ between 250–350 people, including researchers, technical support and operations specialists. The Kansas Department of Agriculture announced in April 2013 that it would move most of its offices from Topeka to Manhattan by June 2014. Kansas State University is the largest employer and educational institution in the city of Manhattan with 23,520 students. KSU is home to Wildcat sports, as well as a host to nationally recognized academics. Kansas State University has ranked first nationally among state universities in its total of Rhodes, Marshall, Truman, Goldwater, and Udall scholars since 1986. Manhattanites are said to "Bleed purple" due to their pride in Kansas State athletics. Manhattan is also home to Manhattan Christian College, Manhattan Area Technical College, the American Institute of Baking and The Flint Hills Job Corps Training Center, and the Kansas Building Science Institute. Manhattan is served by USD 383 Manhattan-Ogden and has one public high school with two campuses (Manhattan High School), two middle schools (Susan B. Anthony and Dwight D. Eisenhower), and eight elementary schools (Amanda Arnold, Frank V. Bergman, Bluemont, Lee, Marlatt, Northview, Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson). The city also has two private school systems: Flint Hills Christian School and the Manhattan Catholic Schools. Manhattan Catholic Schools contains two buildings, the grade school building (K-5)and the Luckey Jr. High building (6–8), formerly called the Luckey high building dedicated to Monsignor Luckey. The school's mascot is "Luckey the Cardinal". Culture in the city of Manhattan is largely defined by Kansas State University students. The city is normally full of activity while school is in session. Due to the city's vitality, the city was rated by CNN Money as one of the top ten places to retire young. There are a number of cultural hot spots around the city that make it as vibrant as it is. Manhattan is served by numerous transportation methods. Manhattan Regional Airport is located 4 kilometres (2 mi) west of Manhattan on K-18. The airport is served by American Eagle, which offers daily flights to Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport and to Chicago's O'Hare International Airport. The nearest major commercial airports are in Kansas City (MCI) and Wichita, Kansas (ICT). A mainline of the Union Pacific Railroad passes through the city, which originally was the Kansas Pacific Railroad. Domestic passenger rail service was discontinued after the Amtrak takeover of passenger rail in 1971. The Rock Island Railroad formerly served Manhattan as a stop on Rock Island's Kansas City–Colorado Springs Rocky Mountain Rocket service. The Rock Island depot was located between Fifth and Sixth streets, along former El Paso Street (now Fort Riley Boulevard). The former railroad right-of-way was converted to Manhattan's southern arterial road as well as a rail-trail, linear park along Manhattan's west side. Inter-city bus service, previously provided by Greyhound Lines, was discontinued years ago. However, Arrow Stage Line operates charter service out of local facilities on McCall Road. Also, KCI Roadrunner provides charter service as well as scheduled shuttle service to and from Kansas City International Airport (KCI), Lawrence, Topeka, Junction City, Ft. Riley, and Manhattan. Within the City of Manhattan, limited mass-transit is provided by Riley County's subsidized paratransit service, ATA Bus. ATA Bus recently started its first set-route bus route in Manhattan connecting an apartment complex and an office campus, and is currently working with the city to develop a feasible mass-transit system. ATA uses four small buses and a number of minivans in its fleet. Five twenty-passenger transit buses have been purchased for fixed-route service and the agency is awaiting operational funding from Kansas State University and the City. Manhattan is served by several highways: Historically, Manhattan was located on the national Victory Highway, one of the original 1920s auto trails. With the creation of the numbered federal highway system in 1926, the highway became U.S. Route 40. From 1926 to 1935, Route 40 diverged west out of Manhattan into "40N" and "40S" routes; the two routes met again in Limon, Colorado. In the 1950s, Route 40 was rerouted nine miles south of Manhattan, due to concerns that originally arose during World War II about the highway passing through neighboring Fort Riley. The new route followed a more direct line between Topeka and Junction City, and in 1956 it was designated as Interstate 70. The Manhattan Mercury is the city's main newspaper, published six days a week. Other newspapers published in the city include: the alternative weekly The Hype Weekly which focuses on events, arts, and culture in the area; the weekly Manhattan Free Press; the agriculture-oriented Grass & Grain; and the K-State university newspaper, the Kansas State Collegian. Manhattan is a center of broadcast media for the surrounding area. One AM and ten FM radio stations are licensed to and/or broadcast from the city. Manhattan lies within the Topeka, Kansas television market, and six stations are licensed to and/or broadcast from the city including: a translator of KTWU, the PBS member station in Topeka; K-State's station KKSU-LP; two GCN translators; and two independent stations. David Grandison Fairchild was a botanist and plant explorer. Fairchild was responsible for the introduction of more than 200,000 exotic plants and varieties of established crops into the United States, including soybeans, pistachios, mangos, nectarines, dates, bamboos, and flowering cherries. Certain varieties of wheat, cotton, and rice became especially economically important. Albert Edward Mead was the fifth Governor of Washington and served in that position from 1905 to 1909. Mead was born in Manhattan on December 14, 1861. Jordy Nelson is an American football wide receiver for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Kansas State University, and received All-American honors. Nelson was drafted in the second round of the 2008 NFL Draft. Cassandra Peterson is an actress best known for her on-screen horror hostess character Elvira, Mistress of the Dark. She gained fame on Los Angeles television station KHJ wearing a black, gothic, cleavage-enhancing gown as host of Movie Macabre, a weekly horror movie presentation. Her wickedly vampish appearance is offset by her comical character, quirky and quick-witted personality, and Valley girl-type speech. Cassandra was born in Manhattan and later was involved in The Elvira Show, a 1993 CBS television pilot revolving around two witches (played by Elvira and Katherine Helmond) who move to Manhattan with their talking cat. In 1998, Bill Snyder at Kansas State was recognized as the National Coach of the Year by the Associated Press, the Walter Camp Football Foundation, and was awarded the Bear Bryant Award and the Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award. He was also a finalist for the Bear Bryant Award in 1993 and 1995, a finalist for the Football News National Coach of the Year Award in 1995 and 1998, and a finalist for the Kodak/AFCA National Coach of the Year Award in 1993 and 1998. Of somewhat lesser note, ESPN selected Snyder as its national coach of the year in 1991, and CNN selected him as its national coach of the year in 1995. Earl Woods was a US Army infantry officer who served two tours of duty in Vietnam, and retired with the rank of lieutenant colonel. He was a college-level baseball player and writer, but is best remembered as the father of professional golfer Tiger Woods. Woods started his son in golf at a very early age, and coached him exclusively for his first years in the sport.
Municipal Auditorium is a large, multi-purpose facility in Kansas City, Missouri with three halls: The Arena, Music Hall, and Little Theatre. It opened in 1936 and features Streamline Moderne and Art Deco architecture and architectural details. Municipal Auditorium was one of the buildings built in 1934 as part of a "Ten Year Plan" championed by various local politicians including Harry S. Truman and Thomas Pendergast. Other buildings in the plan included the Kansas City City Hall and the Kansas City branch of the Jackson County Courthouse. It replaced Convention Hall which was directly across the street and was torn down for parking in what is now called the Barney Allis Plaza. The streamline moderne architecture was designed by the lead architectural firm of Gentry, Voskamp & Neville to appeal to new visitors with cool and confident restraint. True to its name, the style promised to envelop the visitor in modernity, assuring him/her that Kansas City was a rising star in the country, a place to recommend to friends and colleagues. Alonzo H. Gentry, of the lead architectural firm of Gentry, Voskamp & Neville, was to later design the Truman Library. Hoit, Price & Barnes, the associated architects responsible for the HVAC work at the Municipal Auditorium, had recently designed the Art Deco skyscraper, the Kansas City Power and Light Building (completed in 1931). When the building opened in 1935, it was called by the Architectural Record "one of the 10 best buildings of the world that year" In 2000, the Princeton Architectural Press called it one of the 500 most important architectural works in the United States. Municipal Auditorium is connected to the H. Roe Bartle Convention Center by way of skywalks over 13th and Central streets. An underground walkway through a public parking garage provides access to the Kansas City Marriott Downtown, Holiday Inn Aladdin Hotel, and the Folly Theater. The Arena, nicknamed "Municipal," has hosted the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association tournament since 2003, held every year in early March. When Kansas City hosts the Big 12 tournament, women's games take place here. It is currently home to the NAIA Men's Division I Basketball National Tournament. It was played here from 1937-1975, when it moved into Kemper Arena, and has been home since the Tournament moved back to Kansas City from Tulsa in 2002. The arena hosted three of the first four Final Fours, but has not hosted a tournament game since 1964. In 2013, the University of Dayton Arena passed Municipal Auditorium in number of games hosted as that arena hosts the opening round game of the NCAA tournament. The 19,500-seat Kemper Arena was built in 1974 to accommodate Kansas City's professional basketball teams that had been playing at the Auditorium. The Kansas City Kings played their first two seasons at the Auditorium, then returned for the majority of the 1979-80 season after the roof of Kemper Arena caved in on June 4, 1979. It was home to the University of Missouri–Kansas City Kangaroos basketball team until they moved their games to the Swinney Recreation Center on campus in fall 2010. Since January 2009, it has been the home of the Kansas City Roller Warriors roller derby league. The Kansas City Music Hall is a large proscenium theatre with a striking Streamline Modern interior that seats an audience of 2,400 patrons. The hall presents touring Broadway shows, as well as visiting symphony orchestras, opera and ballet companies, and other events. It was the main hall of the Kansas City Philharmonic for several decades. It's also the home of the 1927 Robert-Morton Theatre Pipe Organ that originally was in the Kansas City Midland Theatre. The organ is owned and maintained by Kansas City Theatre Pipe Organ, Inc. The Little Theatre is an elegant octogonal ballroom with a capacity for 400, or banquet seating for 225 available for catered events, and a private balcony room for up to 36 guests. Gallery An example of the Art Deco details found throughout Municipal Auditorium. Foyer of
Little Theatre. Art deco chandelier in Music Hall. Wall decoration in
Little Theatre. Monumental Art Deco medallion on the front of Municipal Auditorium.
The 2008–09 Kansas Jayhawks men's basketball team represented the University of Kansas in the 2008-09 NCAA Division I men's basketball season, the Jayhawks' 111th basketball season. The Head Coach was Bill Self, serving his 6th year. The team played its home games in Allen Fieldhouse in Lawrence, Kansas, and were the defending National Champions. The 2007–08 Jayhawks finished the season 37–3 overall with a 13–3 mark in conference play. They won the Big 12 regular season men's basketball championship, which they shared with the Texas Longhorns. In post season play, the Jayhawks won the Big 12 conference tournament championship and received a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. The team went on to win the national championship, 75–68, in overtime vs. the Memphis Tigers. The Jayhawks finished the season #1 in the final Coaches Poll after the tournament and were ranked 5th in the final AP Poll before the tournament. The team raised a temporary NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship banner to the rafters in an official ceremony to celebrate its 2008 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament victory during Late Night in the Phog event. The official championship and final four banners were raised during the November 18 game against Florida Gulf Coast. The Jayhawks lost five scholarship seniors from their national title team in addition to three underclassmen (Brandon Rush, Mario Chalmers, and Darrell Arthur) who opted to enter the NBA draft and eventually signed with agents. Returning from the national championship team are stars Sherron Collins, point guard, and Cole Aldrich, center. Other players returning are: seniors Matt Kleinmann and Brennan Bechard, and sophomores Brady Morningstar, Chase Buford, Tyrel Reed, and Connor Teahan. Coach Self signed seven recruits for the 2008–09 season. The class was led by New Jersey twins Marcus and Markieff Morris who both played the power forward position. Another signee from New Jersey was Quintrell Thomas, who also played the power forward position. Travis Releford, a Kansas City product was the first signee for the Jayhawks and was in the mix for departed star Brandon Rush's spot in the starting rotation. Coach Self also managed to lure point guard Tyshawn Taylor to Lawrence, after he was released from his letter of intent to play for Marquette. The Jayhawks also signed junior college transfers Tyrone Appleton and Mario Little. Sources: Kansas finished the regular season 25–6 (14–2). After being picked to tie for 3rd in the conference in preseason, the Jayhawks defied expectations and won their 5th straight Big 12 conference championship and 52nd overall.
Blue and Crimson Big Eight
1981, 1984, 1986, 1992
Missouri Valley
1908, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1912, 1914, 1915, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927
Big Six / Big Seven / Big Eight
1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1946, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1957, 1960, 1966, 1967, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1978, 1986, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996
The Kansas Jayhawks men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball program of the University of Kansas and is one of the oldest and most successful programs in the history of college basketball. The program is classified in the NCAA's Division I and the team competes in the Big 12 Conference. The Jayhawks' first coach was the inventor of the game, James Naismith, who is, ironically, the only coach in the program's history with a losing record. The Kansas basketball program has produced many notable professional players, including Clyde Lovellette, Wilt Chamberlain, Jo Jo White, Danny Manning, Paul Pierce, Mario Chalmers and coaches (including Phog Allen, Adolph Rupp, John McLendon, Dean Smith, Dutch Lonborg, Larry Brown, Roy Williams and Bill Self). Allen founded the National Association of Basketball Coaches and, with Lonborg, was an early proponent of the NCAA tournament. In 2008, ESPN ranked Kansas second on a list of the most prestigious programs of the modern college basketball era, behind only Duke. Kansas has the longest current streak of consecutive NCAA tournament appearances (24), holds the longest current streak of winning seasons (31), has the most winning seasons in Division I history (95), the most non-losing seasons (.500 or better) in NCAA history (98), the most conference championships in Division I history (56), the most First Team All Americans in Division I history (21), the most First Team All American Selections in Division I history (29), is third in Division I all-time winning percentage (.721) and is second in Division I all-time wins (2,101). Following a 19-11 defeat of William Jewell on February 10, 1908, the Jayhawks had a winning all-time record for the first time. The Jayhawks haven't had a losing all-time record since. Since the opening of Allen Fieldhouse in 1955, the Jayhawks have established a home record of 699-108 (.866), and since February 20, 1994, the Jayhawks have lost only 14 regular season games in the venue.][ Under head coach Bill Self the Jayhawks have a 161-8 (.953) record at Allen Fieldhouse including a 107-2 (.982) record in their last 109 games which included a 69 game win streak. Kansas ranks second all-time (behind Kentucky) in NCAA Division I wins with 2,101 wins (as of the end of the 2012-13 season), against 812 losses (.721 all time winning %, 3rd all-time). This record includes a 699–108 (.866) mark at historic Allen Fieldhouse. The Jayhawks are first in NCAA history with 96 winning seasons, and tied for first in NCAA history with 99 non-losing (.500 or better) seasons with Kentucky. Kansas has the fewest head coaches (8) of any program that has been around 100 years, yet has reached the Final Four under more head coaches (6) than any other program in the nation. Every head coach at Kansas since the inception of the NCAA Tournament has led the program to the Final Four. Kansas has had four head coaches inducted into the Naismith Hall of Fame, more than any other program in the nation. A perennial conference powerhouse, Kansas leads Division I all-time in regular season conference titles with 56 in 105 years of conference play (the MVIAA Conference was created in 1907) through the 2012–2013 regular season. The Jayhawks have won a record 13 conference titles and a record 9 conference tournament titles in the 17 years of the Big 12's existence. The program also owns the best Big 12 records in both those areas with a 279–48 record in conference play and a 32–8 record in tournament play. The Jayhawks won their 2,000th game in school history when they defeated Texas Tech in the 2009–2010 season, joining University of Kentucky and University of North Carolina as the only schools to boast such an achievement. The men's basketball program officially began in 1898, following the arrival of Dr. James Naismith to the school, just six years after Naismith had written the sport's first official rules. Naismith was not initially hired to coach basketball, but rather to be a chapel director and physical education instructor. During those early years, the majority of the university's basketball games were played against nearby YMCA teams, with YMCAs across the nation having played an integral part in the birth of basketball. Other common opponents were Haskell Institute and William Jewell College. Under Naismith, the team played just one game against a current Big 12 school, a matchup with Kansas State University . Naismith was, ironically, the only coach in the program's history to have a losing record (55–60). Including his years as coach, Naismith served as the Athletic Director and a faculty member at Kansas for a total of almost 40 years before retiring in 1937. Naismith died in 1939, and his remains are buried in Lawrence, Kansas. The basketball court in Allen Fieldhouse is named James Naismith Court. Beyond inventing the game, his next greatest basketball legacy may be his coaching tree, whose two trunks are the well-known Phog Allen and the more recently better recognized Kansas native John McLendon. (McLendon attended KU in the 1930s when Allen was head coach, but segregation prevented McLendon from actually playing for Allen. Naismith mentored McLendon from his arrival at Kansas through degree completion and beyond.) On December 10, 2010, the David Booth family purchased Dr. James Naismith's 13 Original Rules of the game at a Sotheby's auction in New York City for the sum of $4.3 million dollars. They intend to bring the founding document of basketball back to Lawrence, KS., where it will likely be housed inside Allen Fieldhouse's Booth Family Hall of Athletics. In 1907, KU hired one of Naismith's players, Dr. Forrest C. "Phog" Allen as head coach. Naismith provided Allen with a now infamous piece of wisdom: "You can't coach basketball; you just play it." Allen would set out to prove the adage wrong and through success and an unrivaled coaching tree has become known as the "Father of Basketball Coaching", having passed on his knowledge of the game to some of the most well-respected names in the history of college basketball, including National Basketball Hall of Fame coaches Adolph Rupp, Dean Smith, Dutch Lonborg and Ralph Miller (all except Lonborg were born and raised in Kansas). Allen coached the team from 1907–09, but William O. Hamilton coached from 1909–1919, with Allen taking over again in 1919. The team went 125–59 and won five conference championships under Hamilton's direction. Allen coached KU for 39 seasons and amassed a record of 590–219, with two Helms Foundation national titles and one NCAA Tournament championship in 1952. Numerous basketball greats would play at Kansas during Allen's era, including Dean Smith, Adolph Rupp, Dutch Lonborg, and Ralph Miller (all future Hall of Fame coaches), Paul Endacott, Bill Johnson, and Clyde Lovellette (Hall of Fame players), two-time Olympic Gold Medalist Bill Hougland, and even former United States Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole. In 1952, the Jayhawks won the national title with a 80–63 victory in the final game over St. John's, coached by Frank McGuire. Clyde Lovellette of Kansas was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player, and is still the only player to lead the nation in scoring and lead his team to a national title in the same year. This tournament was the first to have a true "Final Four" format. Seven members of the championship team represented the United States in the 1952 Summer Olympics and brought home a gold medal for the national basketball team. This was especially poignant for Allen, as he had been the driving force for having basketball added to the Olympics in 1936. Allen was forced to retire when he turned 70 in 1956, because he was getting too "old". That was very unlucky because legendary Wilt Chamberlain came the very next season. Following Allen's retirement, the Jayhawks hired former KU player and assistant, Dick Harp. Under Harp the Jayhawks went 121–82 with two conference titles and two NCAA tournament berths. Wilt Chamberlain played his varsity years under Harp, making his job a rather easy one for the first two seasons. In his first varsity game, Chamberlain scored 52 points and grabbed 31 rebounds, breaking both all-time college records in an 87–69 win against Northwestern. In 1957, he led the Jayhawks to the championship game against North Carolina, coached by Frank McGuire, whom they had defeated in the 1952 title game when McGuire was at St. John's. McGuire triple-teamed Chamberlain and, as a result, KU was defeated 54–53 in triple overtime. The game is considered one of the greatest in NCAA history. Chamberlain continued to average 30+ points per game until leaving KU early to play professionally with the Harlem Globetrotters. Ted Owens took over for Harp in 1964, and would go 348–128 during his tenure, eventually winning six Big Eight Conference titles. The team advanced to NCAA postseason play seven times under Owens. The 1971 team went 27–3 and advanced to the Final Four before losing to UCLA. In 1974 the team went 23–7 and again advanced to the Final Four before losing to Marquette. During this era the program produced all-Americans such as Jo Jo White, Walt Wesley, Bud Stallworth, Darnell Valentine, and Dave Robisch. After 19 years of coaching at University of Kansas, Ted Owens left for Oral Roberts. In 1983, Larry Brown headed to the University of Kansas, after coaching in the NBA. Under Brown, Kansas finished first in the Big Eight in 1986, and second in 1984, 1985, and 1987. In 1988, Kansas got off to a mediocre 12–8 start, including 1–4 in the Big 8. The Jayhawks' 55-game homecourt winning streak in Allen Fieldhouse was snapped with a loss to Kansas State, and they would also lose 2 more home games to Duke and Oklahoma. Behind the high-scoring of Danny Manning, KU finished 21–11 at the end of the season and entered the NCAA tournament as a #6 seed. Two early upsets allowed them to face lower seeds, gain momentum, and advance. The Jayhawks would ultimately go on to face the three teams who had given them their three home losses that season. They defeated Kansas State in the Elite 8, then defeated Duke in the Final 4, and won the national championship, defeating favored conference rival Oklahoma 83–79 in the final. The 11 losses Kansas accrued in 1988 are more than any other National Champion have before or since. The win garnered the team the nickname "Danny and the Miracles". Earlier, near the start of the tournament, Dick Vitale had been asked about Kansas' chances and commented "If Kansas wins, I'll kiss the Jayhawk on the floor of Allen Fieldhouse." Eventually, he did make good on his promise. During Brown's tenure, Kansas had five NCAA Tournament appearances, which included two second round appearances, one Sweet 16 appearance, two trips to the Final Four and the national championship. He also compiled a 135–44 (.754) overall record. Brown left under a cloud, as NCAA sanctions and a postseason probation were levied against Kansas following Brown's departure in the 1988–1989 season as a result of recruiting violations that took place during Brown's tenure. The major violation was a plane ticket home for potential transfer Vincent Askew to see his sick grandmother. Prior to the investigation, Askew had already decided not to transfer to Kansas. Shortly following Brown's departure, Kansas hired then North Carolina assistant Roy Williams as head coach. From 1988–2003, under the direction of Williams, the Jayhawks had a record of 418–101, a .805 winning percentage. Williams' Kansas teams averaged 27.8 wins per season. Except for his first season at Kansas (when the team was on probation), all of Williams' teams made the NCAA tournament. From 1990 to 1999 Kansas compiled a 286–60 record, giving them both the most wins and best winning percentage of any team in that decade. From 1994 to 1998, the Jayhawks won 62 consecutive home games at Allen Fieldhouse, which was the longest such streak in the NCAA at the time. The seniors of 1998 (Raef LaFrentz, Billy Thomas, and C.B. McGrath) went 58–0 at home during their KU careers. Kansas won nine regular-season conference championships over his last 13 years. In seven years of Big 12 Conference play, his teams went 94–18, capturing the regular-season title in 1997, 1998, 2002 and 2003 and the postseason tournament crown in 1997, 1998 and 1999. In 2001–02, KU became the first, and so far only, team to go undefeated (16–0) in Big 12 play. From 1995–98, Kansas was a combined 123–17 – an average of 30.8 wins per season. Williams' teams went 201–17 (.922) in Allen Fieldhouse, and won 62 consecutive games in Allen from February 1994 to December 1998. Kansas was a regular in the Associated Press Top 25 from 1991 to 1999, placing in the poll for 145 consecutive weeks. Williams' teams were ranked in the Top 10 in 194 AP polls from 1990. Kansas led the nation in field goal percentage and scoring in 2002 and in scoring margin in 2003; they held opponents to the lowest field goal percentage in the country in 2001 (37.8 percent); led the nation in winning percentage in 1997 and 2002; shot better than 50 percent from the floor for the season seven times; and led the country in field goal percentage in 1990 at 53.3 percent, and in 2002 at 50.6 percent; shot a combined 49.4 percent from the floor in 15 seasons; led the nation in assists in 2001 and 2002 and was seventh in the nation in 2003; scored 100 or more points 71 times (once every 13 games); averaged 82.7 points per game in 15 years; averaged 90 or more points in two seasons (92.1 in 1990 and 90.9 in 2002). The Jayhawks were in the AP Top 25 in 242 of 268 weekly polls. Kansas reached the No. 1 ranking in the country in six different seasons and was ranked at least No. 2 in the nation in 11 of the 15 seasons. Under Williams, the team had several deep runs in the NCAA Tournament, making it to four Final Fours and appearing in the national championship game in both 1991 and 2003, losing both, to Duke and Syracuse respectively. Amidst the tournament successes, there were plenty of woes. The 1996–97 team was said by many to be one of the greatest teams in history, featuring future NBA players such as Paul Pierce, Jacque Vaughn, Raef LaFrentz, and Scot Pollard. The team was upset in the Sweet Sixteen by the eventual champion, Arizona Wildcats. The Jayhawks advanced to the Final Four in 2002 & 2003. Following the national championship loss in 2003, Williams left Kansas and returned to coach at his alma mater, North Carolina. Bill Self was introduced as the new head coach for the 2003–04 season and in his first season at Kansas, Self inherited Williams' players and recruits, which often caused turmoil as the style of play differed between the two coaches. Nevertheless, Self led his new Kansas team to the Elite Eight at the NCAA tournament his first year. The next two seasons did not end on such a high note. Big things were expected of an experienced KU in 2004–05, led by seniors Wayne Simien, Keith Langford, Michael Lee, and Aaron Miles. They began the season ranked #1 and started off 20–1, but then they slumped and lost six of their final nine games, including a loss to Bucknell in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. The team finished 23–7 and settled for a Big 12 co-championship with Oklahoma. In 2005–06, little was expected of the freshman/sophomore dominated Jayhawks, and they began the season 10–6, including 1–2 in the Big 12. Although they did post a 73–46 win over Kentucky, they also saw the end of their 31-game winning streak over rival Kansas State with a 59–55 loss at Allen Fieldhouse, and two nights later blew a seven-point lead in the final 45 seconds of regulation en route to a 89–86 overtime loss at Missouri. But afterward, the Jayhawks matured rapidly, winning 15 of their final 17 games and avenging the losses to both Kansas State and Missouri. KU played as the #2 seed in the Big 12 Tournament in Dallas, and avenged an earlier loss to Texas with a 80–68 victory over the Longhorns in the final to clinch the Tournament championship and the highlight win of the season. KU was handed a #4 seed for the NCAA Tournament but stumbled again in the first round with a loss to the Bradley Braves. In the 2006–07 season, Self led Kansas to the 2007 Big 12 regular season championship with a 14–2 record, highlighted by beating the Kevin Durant-led Texas Longhorns in monumental come-from-behind victories in the last game of the regular season and in the Big 12 Championship game. At the end of the regular season, Kansas stood at 27–4 and ranked #2 in the nation in both the AP and Coaches' polls. Kansas received a number 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament, but their tournament run ended in the Elite Eight with a loss to 2-seed UCLA. In the 2007–2008 season, Self's Kansas team began the season 20–0 until they suffered their first loss at Kansas State, their first loss at Kansas State since 1983. The 2008 Jayhawks won the Big 12 regular season title and the Big 12 conference tourney. They received a number one seeding in the NCAA Tournament in the Midwest region. On March 30, 2008, Self led Kansas to a win in an Elite Eight game over upstart Davidson College. KU won by two, 59–57. The Jayhawks played overall number 1 tournament seed North Carolina in the semifinals, a team coached by former KU head man Roy Williams. The Jayhawks opened the game with a 40-12 run over the first 12½ minutes, leaving Williams and UNC fans stunned, before finally defeating them 84–66. On April 7, 2008, the Jayhawks triumphed over a one loss Memphis team to claim the national title in an amazing regulation finish, with perhaps the most memorable shot in Kansas basketball history. With only seconds on the clock, Sherron Collins drove the ball the length of the court and threaded a pass to Mario Chalmers, who connected on a deep three-pointer to force overtime. This shot would later come to be known as "Mario's Miracle" in a nod to 1988 Championship nickname "Danny and the Miracles." Kansas then outplayed Memphis in the overtime to win the NCAA Championship game 75–68. The Jayhawks finished the season with a 37–3 record, the winningest season in Kansas history. In the 2008–2009 season, despite losing 7 of their top 9 scorers and the entire starting line-up, the Jayhawks earned their 20th consecutive NCAA Tournament bid after going 25–7 (14–2), winning the conference regular season title and extending their home winning streak to 41 straight at Allen Fieldhouse. On March 22, 2009, Kansas defeated Dayton, advancing to their 3rd consecutive Sweet 16 appearance. But the Jayhawks' season ended on March 27 when Michigan State came from behind in the final minute to defeat Kansas 67–62, ending their year at 27–8. Coach Self's record, after 6 seasons with the Jayhawks, was 169–40, an .809 percentage. After the season, Self was named National Coach of the Year by the Associated Press, CBS Sports' Chevrolet Award, USBWA (Henry Iba Award), and Sporting News. On April 13, Sherron Collins and Cole Aldrich announced their intent to return for the 2009–10 season. On April 23, top high school recruit Xavier Henry made his commitment to play at Kansas in the fall, prompting ESPN to name the Jayhawks as "the team to beat in 2009–10." By the time the fall of 2009 arrived, Kansas was the unanimous preseason #1 team in all major publications. The Jayhawks finished the regular season with a 29–2 record and continue to hold the Division I record for the current consecutive home winning streak at 59 straight games in Allen Fieldhouse. Kansas passed 2,000 all-time wins in the 2009–10 season, only the third school to do so (finishing the season with a total of 2,003 all-time victories). They won the Big 12 tournament on March 13, clinching their 21st consecutive NCAA Tournament appearance, an active NCAA record. However, despite being named the overall #1 seed in the tournament, the Jayhawks fell in the 2nd Round to #9 seeded Northern Iowa, a major upset, finishing the season at 33–3. Recruiting began immediately for the 2010–11 season, as Kansas landed the nation's top recruit Josh Selby in April. By September 2010, both The Sporting News and Athlon Sports had ranked Kansas in their pre-season outlook as #4 overall and, along with ESPN's Joe Lunardi, were projected to become a #1 seed again in the 2011 NCAA Tournament, which they would again do. Blue Ribbon and the USA Today/ESPN coaches polls both placed Kansas at #7 in the pre-season poll. Josh Selby, became eligible and joined the Jayhawk line-up on December 18. On March 5, the Jayhawks beat Missouri 70–66 to clinch the Big 12 regular-season title for the 7th consecutive time and later went on to finish 29–2 during the regular season, ranked #2 in both the AP Poll and the USA Today/ESPN Coaches Poll. Bill Self was named Big 12 Coach Of The Year and Marcus Morris was named Big 12 Player Of The Year. The Jayhawks defeated 16 seed Boston University, 9 seed Illinois and 12 seed Richmond to reach their 3rd Elite Eight in the past 5 seasons before falling to 11 seed Virginia Commonwealth University in the quarterfinal game. During the season, Kansas moved past North Carolina as the 2nd winningest basketball program in history. After being considered the top team but falling short in both of the past 2 seasons, Kansas lost 6 of their top 8 scorers for the 2011–12 season. The Jayhawks had to rebuild after winning 7 straight Big 12 titles. Prior to the season, the NCAA declared that three of the Jayhawks top recruits were ineligible for the season, which included games against perennial powerhouse programs such as Kentucky, Duke, Ohio State, and Georgetown. Despite 7 games against top 10 ranked opponents, Kansas finished the regular season 26–5, earned their 8th consecutive Big 12 title, and advanced to their 14th Final Four in school history. The Jayhawks would face another 2 seed, the Ohio State Buckeyes, in the National Semifinals. Kansas would come back from a 13 point first half deficit to win the game, 64–62. They then would face the Kentucky Wildcats, who had beaten the Louisville Cardinals on the other side of the bracket, in the championship game. Kansas would fall to the Wildcats, 67–59. Kansas entered the 2012-13 season, with 8 straight Big 12 titles in tow. They continue to have the greatest home court advantage in all of sports, ending the season having won 107 of their last 109 games at home (as of 3/4/13). After scoring their 9th consecutive title and winning the Big 12 tournament championship by defeating Kansas State for the 3rd time that season, KU set it's sights on a 6th national title. They were seeded #1 in the South bracket, defeating Western Kentucky and North Carolina before losing in overtime to Michigan 87-85 in the Sweet 16. The Jayhawks entered the 2012-2013 season ranked #12 in the nation. As of March 24, 2013, their record is 31-5, and 14-4 in Big 12 conference play. In early February, the Jayhawks went on a three-game losing streak, something nearly unprecedented in recent Kansas basketball history. After a 62-55 loss on February 6, 2013 to TCU, who had not won a Big 12 conference game in school history, head coach Bill Self ranted in a post-game press conference, stating that he believes the team that played TCU was the worst Kansas has ever put on the floor. The Jayhawks then went forward in defeating #13 Kansas State, winning in double overtime at #14 Oklahoma State Cowboys, 68-67 and brutalizing TCU at Allen Fieldhouse, which helped clearly end the drought. On March 2 against West Virginia freshman Ben McLemore scored 36 points breaking Danny Manning's freshman single game scoring record. With their win over Western Kentucky University on March 22, the Jayhawks became the only team to have four consecutive 30-win seasons, arguably the first as Memphis' 2008 season was vacated. Kansas faced Roy Williams' North Carolina Tarheels in the following round, defeating them 70-58 and advancing to the Sweet 16. They lost to Michigan on March 29th. Above totals are through the end of the 2012/13 season. † – Inducted into the Naismith Hall of Fame. NOTES: Updated March 24, 2013 Prior to 1907
Before 1907 the Jayhawks played in various venues, ranging from the basement of the original Snow Hall (even though the ceiling was only 14 feet high) to the skating rink at the local YMCA. Although a current campus building bears the same name, the original Snow Hall was demolished in 1934. Robinson Gymnasium (1907–1927)
Robinson Gym was the first athletic building on the KU campus and featured a 2,500 seat auditorium used for basketball purposes. The building was demolished in 1967.
Hoch Auditorium (1927–1955)
Hoch Auditorium was a 3,500 seat multi-purpose arena in Lawrence, Kansas. It opened in 1927. It was home to the University of Kansas Jayhawks basketball teams until Allen Fieldhouse opened in 1955. Many of Hoch's nicknames during the basketball years were "Horrible Hoch" and "The House of Horrors." Such nicknames were in reference to the difficulty opposing teams had in dealing with the tight area surrounding the court and the curved walls and decorative lattice work directly behind the backboards. The curvature of the walls made the backboards appear to be moving causing opponents to miss free throws. On June 15, 1991, Hoch Auditorium was struck by lightning. The auditorium and stage area were completely destroyed. Only the limestone facade and lobby area were spared. When reconstruction of the building was complete, the rear half of the building was named Budig Hall, for then KU Chancellor Gene Budig. The name on the facade was altered to reflect the presence of three large auditorium-style lecture halls within the building: Hoch Auditoria. Former KU Basketball Facilities
Allen Fieldhouse (1955–Present) Allen Fieldhouse was dedicated on March 1, 1955 when the Jayhawks defeated in-state rival, Kansas State 77-67. Since February 20, 1994, the Jayhawks have lost only 14 regular season games in Allen Fieldhouse, a 263–14 record (.951). Since February 3, 2007, the Jayhawks have gone 107-2 (.995) at Allen Fieldhouse, as of March 2, 2013, the best home record in all of basketball. And if the Jayhawks' home record doesn't scare opponents, the noise level inside The Phog will. On November 4, 2010, ESPN The Magazine named Allen Fieldhouse the loudest college basketball arena in the country, reaching sustained decibel levels over 120. The Booth Family Hall of Athletics is the future home of Dr. Naismith's Original 13 Rules Of Basketball, purchased at auction by the Booth family for $4.3 million on December 10, 2010. Plans for the document's enshrinement there are in the early stages. Kansas won 69 consecutive games at the Fieldhouse between February 3, 2007 and January 17, 2011 until Texas ended the longest streak in NCAA Division I since 1992 with a 74-63 win against Kansas on January 22, 2011. This streak broke Kansas' previous school record, which lasted from February 26, 1994 through December 18, 1998 (during which time, the Jayhawks, along with the remaining members of the Big Eight Conference merged with the remaining members of the Southwest Conference to become charter members of the Big 12 Conference). The Jayhawks also completed a 55-game streak between February 22, 1984 through January 30, 1988, which remains a record for the Big 8 era. Throughout the era of the 12-team Big 12 (1997–2011), the Jayhawks compiled an amazing 43-2 (.955) record in Allen Fieldhouse vs. the teams from the south division (Baylor, Oklahoma, Oklahoma State, Texas, Texas A&M, and Texas Tech). A south team did not win in the Phog in the first 10 seasons of the Big 12 until Texas A&M broke through in 2007. And then it did not happen again until Texas was able to get it done in 2011. Following the end of the 2011 season, the Big 12 no longer has divisions. Of further note, Oklahoma and Oklahoma State can claim victories in Allen Fieldhouse prior to the Big 12 in Big 8 conference play. Baylor and Texas Tech have never won there. Before the start of every Jayhawks home game, after the singing of "The Star-Spangled Banner," it is a tradition to sing the alma mater, "Crimson and the Blue", during which it is customary for students and alumni to throw their arms over the shoulders of the people next to them and slowly sway side to side. The song is concluded by the famous Rock Chalk Chant. After singing The Star-Spangled Banner, while the opposing team is being introduced, the members of the student section take out a copy of the student-run newspaper, The University Daily Kansan, and wave the paper in front of their faces, pretending to be reading it in an effort to show disinterest in the opposing team. After the opponents are introduced, a short video is shown, detailing the history and the accomplishments of Kansas basketball. As the Jayhawks are introduced, the students rip up their newspapers and throw the confetti pieces of paper in the air as celebration. Whatever confetti remains is typically thrown in the air after the first basket made by the Jayhawks. If an opposing player fouls out of the game, the crowd will "wave the wheat," waving their arms back and forth, as a sarcastic good-bye to the disqualified player, to the tune of "You Didn't Have Your Wheaties", from a series of 1970s television commercials promoting Wheaties breakfast cereal. The same waving motion to the tune of "A Hot Time in the Old Town" follows a Jayhawk victory. If the Jayhawks are leading comfortably near the end of the game, the crowd begins a slow version of the Rock Chalk Chant, which has become the signature tradition of Allen Fieldhouse. Fans will also line up early for Late Night In The Phog, which is the first practice of the season. The practice is viewable to the public and includes skits with past players as the hosts. Under Bill Self:  National champion    Conference regular season champion    Conference tournament champion
 Conference regular season and conference tournament champion  Conference division champion
The Jayhawks have won 56 conference championships since their inception. The Jayhawks have belonged to the Big 12 Conference since it formed before the 1996–97 season. Before that, the Jayhawks have belonged to the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association from the 1907–08 to 1927–28 seasons, the Big Six Conference from 1928–29 to 1946–47, the Big Seven Conference from 1947–48 to 1957–58, the Big Eight Conference from 1958–59 up until the end of the 1995–96 season. It should be noted that the Big Six and Big Seven conferences were actually the more often used names of the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association, which existed under that official name until 1964, when it was changed to the Big Eight. Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (13) Big Six Conference (12) Big Seven Conference (5) Big Eight Conference (13) Big 12 Conference (13) The Big Eight Conference did not regularly have a post-season tournament until after the 1977 season. Prior to that teams usually played in the Big Eight (before that, Big Seven) Holiday Tournament in December. The Holiday tournament ended after the 1979 season. Big Seven/Big Eight Holiday Tournament (13) Big Eight Conference (4) Big 12 Conference (9) The NCAA began seeding the tournament with the 1979 edition. * – Overall number one seed. The committee began ranking 1 seeds in 2004. Kansas leads all NCAA teams with 28 consensus First Team All-American selections, 21 different players have received the honor. ‡ indicates player has made at least 2000 points and 1000 rebounds in his college career. All such KU players have been named All-American. † indicates Academic All-American of the Year The 35 McDonald's All-Americans listed below have signed with Kansas. Notes: Representing the United States men's national basketball team unless otherwise noted. *Valentine was selected to the US team, but the USA boycotted the 1980 summer Olympics. In 2008, five Jayhawks were drafted: Darrell Arthur, Mario Chalmers, Darnell Jackson, Sasha Kaun and Brandon Rush. This tied the record for most players selected in the draft in one year from one school. Kansas tied with Connecticut in 2006 and Florida in 2007. This record was broken in the 2012 NBA Draft when the Kentucky Wildcats, who ironically enough, defeated Kansas for the 2012 NCAA Title. Kentucky had six players selected in the 2012 NBA Draft. Territorial Picks
From 1947–65 the draft allowed teams not drawing fans to select a local player, in place of their first round pick. Regular Draft Division I Head Coaches - former head coaches Division I Head Coaches – former players Division I head coaches – former assistants Division I head coaches – Kansas alumni Division I assistants – former players Division I assistants – former assistants Division II head coaches
Cole David Aldrich (born October 31, 1988) is an American professional basketball player who last played for the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He completed his junior year at the University of Kansas in March 2010. Aldrich was selected as a McDonald's All American in 2006. He attended Bloomington Jefferson High School. The New Orleans Hornets selected Aldrich eleventh overall in the first round of the 2010 NBA Draft. Aldrich attended Bloomington Jefferson High School in Bloomington, Minnesota. As a senior, he was named state player of the year by the St. Paul Pioneer Press and Minneapolis Star-Tribune. During the 2007–08 season at Kansas, Aldrich's freshman season, his playing time was limited due to playing behind future NBA draft picks Darrell Arthur, Sasha Kaun, and Darnell Jackson. He averaged three rebounds and 2.8 points a game on 8.3 minutes a game during the regular season. Statistically, Aldrich's best performance was an 11-point, 11-rebound outing in a win over Texas Tech on March 3, 2008. Probably the most crucial game for Aldrich was during the Final Four game between Kansas and North Carolina on April 5, 2008, when he played only 16 minutes but managed to grab 8 rebounds and score 7 points along with blocking 4 shots while also playing effective defense against National Player of the Year Tyler Hansbrough, helping lead Kansas into the NCAA national championship game. They then defeated the Memphis Tigers to win their first Championship since 1988. With the departure of the other Jayhawk big men to the NBA draft, Aldrich became the premier big-man going into his sophomore season. Through the first 29 games, he averaged a double-double with 15.1 points and 10.8 rebounds in 29.7 minutes of play. He grabbed a career-high 20 rebounds in an 87–78 win over Oklahoma on February 23, 2009,. On March 8, 2009, Aldrich was named to the 2008–09 Big 12 All-conference first team. On March 22, 2009 Aldrich recorded the first official triple-double in the history of Kansas basketball against Dayton in the second round of the NCAA tournament. Aldrich accumulated 13 points, 20 rebounds, and 10 blocks in a 60–43 victory. On Monday, April 13, Aldrich announced that he would return to KU for his Junior season. He won the 2009–10 men's college basketball Academic All-American of the Year as selected by CoSIDA and presented by ESPN the Magazine. He ended his college career a perfect 55–0 at Allen Fieldhouse. On March 29, 2010, Aldrich announced that he would forgo his final season of collegiate eligibility and enter the 2010 NBA Draft. He was the 11th pick, selected by the New Orleans Hornets, who traded his rights on draft day to the Oklahoma City Thunder. On August 6, 2010, Aldrich signed a two-year contract with the Thunder with a two-year option. On November 24, 2010, the Thunder assigned Aldrich to the Tulsa 66ers of the NBA D-League. He was recalled on December 6, 2010, but sent back to Tulsa on December 30, 2010. He was again recalled on February 2, 2011, and assigned for a third time on March 30, 2011. Aldrich reached the 2012 NBA Finals with the Thunder, but the team lost to the Miami Heat. In October 2012, Aldrich, James Harden, Daequan Cook, and Lazar Hayward were traded to the Houston Rockets for Kevin Martin, Jeremy Lamb, and draft picks. On February 20, 2013, Aldrich was traded to the Sacramento Kings along with Toney Douglas and Patrick Patterson in exchange for Thomas Robinson, Francisco García and Tyler Honeycutt.
Overland Park is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. Located in Johnson County, it is the largest suburb in the Kansas City metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 173,372. The city traces its roots back to 1905, with the arrival of its founder, William B. Strang Jr.][, who plotted subdivisions along a military roadway on 600 acres (240 ha)][ he purchased that are now part of the old downtown area. One of those subdivisions was named Overland Park, and was the site for the first airplane flight west of the Mississippi with shows by the Wright brothers, sponsored by Strang, on December 24, 1909.][ The city was incorporated as a "first class city" on May 20, 1960, making it one of the youngest][ communities in Johnson County. Its initial population was 28,085 and was bounded by Antioch Road (West), 107th Street (South), Chadwick (East) and I-35 (North). In 1960 the population was 28,085 with 13 square miles (33.7 km2) incorporated. By 1990 the population was 111,790 and in 1995 the incorporated land area was 56.6 square miles (146.6 km2). Since 1995, the population has grown to 173,250 in 2008 with 75.33 square miles (195.10 km2) of land area. Overland Park is now the second most populous city in Kansas. (Wichita is the largest.) In early 2008, the city council voted to annex an additional 15 square miles (39 km2) south of existing city limits. The annexation was approved for an additional 8 miles (13 km) and went into effect March 10. After the annexation, the city spans nearly the entire distance between the northern and southern borders of Johnson County. Downtown Overland Park is located at (38.9822282, -94.6707917) at an elevation of 1,086 feet (331 m). Located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of Interstate 435 and U.S. Route 69, central Overland Park is roughly 13 miles (21 km) south-southwest of downtown Kansas City, Missouri and immediately east of Olathe, the county seat. The city lies on the northern edge of the Osage Plains a few miles south of the Kansas River. One of the river's tributaries, Turkey Creek, flows northeast through the extreme northern part of the city. South of Turkey Creek, the majority of the city lies in the watershed of the Blue River. Several of the river's tributaries run east-northeast across the city; from north to south, these include Indian Creek, Tomahawk Creek, and Negro Creek. In the far southern part of the city, two more tributaries, Coffee Creek and Wolf Creek, join to form the main stem of the Blue River itself. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 75.37 square miles (195.22 km²) of which 74.84 square miles (193.84 km²) is land and 0.53 square mile (1.38 km²) is water. As a suburb of Kansas City, Overland Park is part of the Kansas City metropolitan area, and it borders other communities on all sides. These include Kansas City, Kansas to the north, Mission and Prairie Village to the northeast, Leawood to the east, Stilwell to the south, Olathe and Lenexa to the west, and Shawnee and Merriam to the northwest. Most of Overland Park, specifically the part of it lying north of 159th Street, lies within the area of Johnson County referred to as Shawnee Mission. Overland Park lies in the transition zone between North America's )Cfahumid subtropical climate (Köppen and )Dfahumid continental climate (Köppen zones, typically experiencing hot, humid summers and cold, dry winters. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 173,372 people, 71,443 households, and 45,516 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,316.5 people per square mile (894.4/km²). There were 76,280 housing units at an average density of 1,019.2 per square mile (393.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 84.4% White, 4.3% African American, 0.3% American Indian, 6.3% Asian, 2.1% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanics and Latinos of any race were 6.3% of the population. There were 71,443 households of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.3% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41, and the average family size was 3.04. The median age in the city was 37.8 years. 24.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.2% were from 25 to 44; 27.6% were from 45 to 64; and 12.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.3% male and 51.7% female. The median income for a household in the city was $71,513, and the median income for a family was $93,293. Males had a median income of $65,210 versus $43,413 for females. The per capita income for the city was $39,319. 4.9% of the population and 3.3% of families were living below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under the age of 18 and 4.9% of those 65 and older. The service sector constitutes most of the local economy. Health care, retail trade, professional and technical services, finance and insurance, and information technology are the city’s five largest industries. More than 40 companies have their corporate headquarters in Overland Park. Telecommunications firm Sprint's world headquarters occupies 240 acres (97 ha) of the city and employs about 8,000 people. Other companies with headquarters in the city include Fortune 500 company YRC Worldwide, Black & Veatch, Waddell & Reed, Ferrellgas, Ash Grove Cement Company, and Compass Minerals. Restaurant chain Applebee's was headquartered in the city from 1993 to 2007. As of 2011, 73.9% of the population over the age of 16 was in the labor force. 0.1% was in the armed forces, and 73.8% was in the civilian labor force with 70.0% being employed and 3.8% unemployed. The composition, by occupation, of the employed civilian labor force was: 51.6% in management, business, science, and arts; 28.1% in sales and office occupations; 10.9% in service occupations; 4.2% in natural resources, construction, and maintenance; 5.2% in production, transportation, and material moving. The three industries employing the largest percentages of the working civilian labor force were: educational services, health care, and social assistance (22.4%); professional, scientific, management, administrative, and waste management services (15.6%); and finance, insurance, real estate, and rental and leasing (11.6%). Sprint is the largest employer in the city followed by Shawnee Mission School District, Johnson County Community College, Blue Valley School District, Black & Veatch, OptumRx, the City of Overland Park, YRC Worldwide, Overland Park Regional Medical Center, and Waddell & Reed. The cost of living in Overland Park is below average; compared to a U.S. average of 100, the cost of living index for the city is 88.5. As of 2011, the median home value in the city was $224,200, the median selected monthly owner cost was $1,720 for housing units with a mortgage and $534 for those without, and the median gross rent was $911. In 2012, the dollar value of new residential construction was $142,004,873; the value in new commercial construction was $146,316,340. Under state statute, Overland Park is a city of the first class. Since 1963, it has had a mayor-council-manager form of government. The city council consists of 13 members popularly elected every four years with staggered terms in office. For representative purposes, the city is divided into six wards with two members elected from each ward. The mayor is the 13th member, elected at-large. The council sets policy for the city, annually identifies city priorities for the Kansas Legislature and the United States Congress, and authorizes ordinances, resolutions, contracts, and agreements. The council meets on the first and third Monday of each month. The mayor presides over council meetings, appoints members to resident boards and commissions, meets with constituents, and signs ordinances, resolutions, contracts, and agreements authorized by the council. The city manager administers city operations and implements policies set by the city council. Overland Park lies within Kansas's 3rd U.S. Congressional District. For the purposes of representation in the Kansas Legislature, the city is located in the 6th through 8th, 10th, 11th, 21st, and 37th districts of the Kansas Senate and the 8th, 16th, 19th through 24th, 27th through 29th, and 48th districts of the Kansas House of Representatives. Public education in Overland Park is provided by several school districts including Shawnee Mission School District, Blue Valley School District and Olathe School District. The Shawnee Mission School District operates five high schools. The Olathe School District consists of four high schools. The Blue Valley School District encompasses five high schools. The Johnson County Library serves the city. Overland Park is the location of several branch institutions: The Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas operates Catholic Schools in Overland Park. This list includes: Protestant Christian Schools include: Jewish Schools include: The city does not have its own public transportation system. However, Johnson County, Kansas operates "The JO" within the city limits. As of 2008, Overland Park was not part of Kansas City, MO's plans for a light rail system. Overland Park has more than 1,800 acres (7.3 km2) of park land and open space. Many of the city's 72 parks feature one or more of the following: sand volleyball, hiking and biking trails, playgrounds, tennis courts, basketball courts, and reservable shelters. The city is home to Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a 300 acres (120 ha) arboretum and botanical garden. The Oak Park Mall is one of the area's top shopping locations with Nordstrom, two Dillards, Macy's, JCPenney's and nearly 200 stores. The Deanna Rose Children's Farmstead, a 12-acre (49,000 m2), attraction is among the top 10 tourist destinations in the Kansas City area. It has more than 200 animals, hay rides, fishing pond, early 1900s century school house and more. It was recognized in August 2008 as the top "family" attraction in Kansas City by the Nickelodeon Channel. Overland Park has finished construction on a 12-field tournament-quality soccer complex. All the fields have synthetic turf and lights. It has an irrigation system to cool the turf on hot days. The city is also home to Overland Park Convention Center. Historic Downtown Overland Park contains a Farmer's Market, the clocktower plaza and a statue of Overland Park City founder William B. Strang Jr.. It also hosts the Strang Carriage House and is home to the Overland Park Historical Society. The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art is located on the campus of Johnson County Community College. The city has numerous public art works installed under the Public Art Program, most notable ones being: Overland Park contains three community centers: Matt Ross Community Center, the Jewish Community Center, and Tomahawk Ridge Community Center. Overland Park is highly populated by Protestants, reflective of the overall population of the state of Kansas.][ Large Baptist, Methodist, Nazarene and Pentecostal churches dot the landscape of Overland Park as well as its neighboring suburbs.][ Overland Park is home to Congregation Beth Israel Abraham Voliner, an Orthodox synagogue established in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1894. Another Orthodox synagogue is the Chabad House Center which serves as the Chabad Headquarters for Kansas and Missouri. Overland Park is also home to a relatively small Muslim population. The Islamic Center of Johnson County serves as a mosque and a community center for Muslims in Overland Park. [2] Also, Overland Park is home to a significant number of Roman Catholics. Overland Park falls within the boundaries of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas. Parishes such as Holy Trinity, Holy Cross, Holy Spirit, Ascension and Queen of the Holy Rosary serve Catholics in Overland Park. Holy Cross offers a Spanish mass for the Hispanic community in the city. The city has developed a positive reputation in American media as an affordable and family-friendly community. CNNMoney.com has consistently ranked Overland Park in the top 10 of its 100 Best Places to Live in the United States. In 2009, BusinessWeek ranked the city as one of "The Best Places to Raise Your Kids", and U.S. News & World Report ranked it among "America's 10 Best Places to Grow Up". Overland Park was the setting of the 2008 documentary series High School Confidential and the 2009-2011 television series United States of Tara. The YouTube series The Most Popular Girls in School is set in Overland Park. Tara Dawn Holland, Miss America 1997. After six years as a local literacy advocate and tutor, she took her cause to the national spotlight when she was crowned Miss America 1997. She spent the year fighting for literacy education for people of all ages and backgrounds, as well as raising funds and motivating those involved in the cause. Since her year of service, she has continued to speak for local, state, and national organizations on this critical issue. William B. Strang Jr. (1857—1921) was an American railroad magnate and is considered the founder of the community. In 1905, Strang purchased 600 acres south of Kansas City and adjacent to present day Metcalf Avenue and 80th Street. "Strang envisioned a "park-like" community that was self-sustaining and well planned. He also sought strong commerce, quality education, vibrant neighborhoods, convenient transportation and accommodating recreational facilities." Overland Park has one sister city.
Kansas

Cole David Aldrich (born October 31, 1988) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He completed his junior year at the University of Kansas in March 2010. Aldrich was selected as a McDonald's All American in 2006. He attended Bloomington Jefferson High School. The New Orleans Hornets selected Aldrich eleventh overall in the first round of the 2010 NBA Draft.

Sports are an important part of the culture of the United States. Four of the nation's five most popular team sports were developed in North America: American football, basketball, baseball and ice hockey, whereas soccer was developed in England. The four Major leagues in the United States are the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL); all enjoy massive media exposure and are considered the preeminent competitions in their respective sports in the world. Three of those leagues have teams that represent Canadian cities, and all four are among the most lucrative sports leagues in the world. The top professional soccer league in the United States, Major League Soccer, has not yet reached the popularity levels of the top four sports leagues, although average attendance has been increasing and in fact has matched or surpassed those of the NBA and the NHL.

Professional teams in all major sports operate as franchises within a league. All major sports leagues use the same type of schedule with a playoff tournament after the regular season ends. In addition to the major league-level organizations, several sports also have professional minor leagues, active in smaller cities across the country.

Blue and Crimson

Big Eight
1981, 1984, 1986, 1992

Royal Purple

The Kansas State Wildcats football program (variously Kansas State, K-State, or KSU) is the intercollegiate football program of the Kansas State University Wildcats. The program is classified in the NCAA's Division I Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and the team competes in the Big 12 Conference.

Kansas

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (pronounced "N-C-Double-A") is a nonprofit association of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. It is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

In August 1973, the current three-division setup of Division I, Division II, and Division III was adopted by the NCAA membership in a special convention. Under NCAA rules, Division I and Division II schools can offer scholarships to athletes for playing a sport. Division III schools may not offer any athletic scholarships. Generally, larger schools compete in Division I and smaller schools in II and III. Division I football was further divided into I-A and I-AA in 1978. Subsequently the term "Division I-AAA" was briefly added to delineate Division I schools which do not field a football program at all, but that term is no longer officially used by the NCAA. In 2006, Divisions I-A and I-AA were respectively renamed the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) and Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).

Comparison of the two universities

The Sunflower Showdown is the series of athletic contests between Kansas State University and the University of Kansas, most notably football and men's basketball. The name is derived from the official nickname for the state of Kansas: the Sunflower State.

Blue and Crimson

Big Eight
1981, 1984, 1986, 1992

Blue and Crimson

The Kansas Jayhawks football program is the intercollegiate football program of the University of Kansas. The program is classified in the NCAA's Division I, and the team competes in the Big 12 Conference.

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.

Cole David Aldrich (born October 31, 1988) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association (NBA). He completed his junior year at the University of Kansas in March 2010. Aldrich was selected as a McDonald's All American in 2006. He attended Bloomington Jefferson High School. The New Orleans Hornets selected Aldrich eleventh overall in the first round of the 2010 NBA Draft.

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