Question:

Did Jack Black play in I Still Know What You Did Last Summer?

Answer:

He did star in "I Still Know What You Did Last Summer". His character is viciously killed after being pinned to the table by a hook and stabbed in the chest with a pair of hedge clippers.

More Info:

Thomas Jacob "Jack" Black (born August 28, 1969) is an American actor, producer, comedian, voice artist, writer, and musician. His acting career has been extensive, starring primarily as bumbling and cocky but internally self-conscious outsiders in comedy films, though he has played some serious roles. He is best known for his roles in High Fidelity, Shallow Hal, School of Rock, King Kong (2005), Nacho Libre, Tropic Thunder, Bernie and the Kung Fu Panda films. Black is considered a member of the so-called Frat Pack, a loose grouping of comic actors who have appeared together in various Hollywood films, and has been nominated for two Golden Globe Awards. He is the lead vocalist of the comedic rock group Tenacious D, which he formed in 1994 with friend Kyle Gass.

I Still Know What You Did Last Summer is a 1998 slasher film and a sequel to the 1997 film I Know What You Did Last Summer. Directed by Danny Cannon, the film was written by Trey Callaway, and features characters originally created in Lois Duncan's 1973 novel I Know What You Did Last Summer. Jennifer Love Hewitt, Freddie Prinze, Jr. and Muse Watson reprise their roles, with Brandy, Mekhi Phifer, and Matthew Settle joining the cast. I Still Know What You Did Last Summer continues after the events of the first film.

Callaway's script was published in an edited "young adult" format, leaving in all descriptions of violence but omitting the harsher language. Filming took place in Mexico and California. I Still Know What You Did Last Summer was released to negative reviews, but was a box office success, grossing $84 million worldwide. On August 15, 2006, Columbia Pictures released I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer as a straight-to-video sequel to the film which features no returning cast members. The film was released on Blu-Ray on July 14, 2009.

The Los Angeles Clippers are a professional basketball team in the National Basketball Association, located in Los Angeles, California, United States of America. They play in the Pacific Division of the NBA. The club's home games are played at the Staples Center, an arena shared with the Los Angeles Lakers of the NBA, the Los Angeles Sparks of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), and the Los Angeles Kings of the National Hockey League (NHL).

The Clippers were originally named the Braves and were located in Buffalo, New York. Through relocations to San Diego then Los Angeles, the franchise failed to see significant regular season or playoff success. The Clippers are frequently seen as an example of a perennial loser in American professional sports, drawing unfavorable comparisons to the historically successful Lakers, with whom they have shared a market since 1984 and an arena since 1999.

Sports

A slasher film is a subgenre of horror film, and at times thriller, typically involving a mysterious psychopathic killer stalking and killing a sequence of victims usually in a graphically violent manner, often with a cutting tool such as a knife, an axe, or a chainsaw. Although the term "slasher" may be used as a generic term for any horror movie involving graphic acts of murder, the slasher as a genre has its own set of characteristics which set it apart from related genres like the splatter film.

Possibly the earliest slasher-type film is Thirteen Women (1932), which tells the story of an old college sorority whose former members are set against one another by a vengeful peer, seeking penance for the prejudice they bestowed on her because of her mixed race heritage. Another film influential to the subgenre is Michael Powell's Peeping Tom (1960). The film's plot centers around a man who kills women while using a portable movie camera to record their dying expressions. The film was immensely controversial when first released; critics called it misogynistic (as would critics condemn the slasher films during its golden age). Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), released three months after Peeping Tom, is often seen as an important forerunner to the genre. Even though the villain's body count is only two, the film's "whodunit" plot structure, knife-wielding and mentally disturbed killer, twist ending and 'stalking' camera technique proved influential on films to come. Another early pioneer of the subgenre is director Francis Ford Coppola's controversial 1963 film Dementia 13, which was rushed into production following Psycho's success at the box office.

Films

I Still Know What You Did Last Summer is a 1998 slasher film and a sequel to the 1997 film I Know What You Did Last Summer. Directed by Danny Cannon, the film was written by Trey Callaway, and features characters originally created in Lois Duncan's 1973 novel I Know What You Did Last Summer. Jennifer Love Hewitt, Freddie Prinze, Jr. and Muse Watson reprise their roles, with Brandy, Mekhi Phifer, and Matthew Settle joining the cast. I Still Know What You Did Last Summer continues after the events of the first film.

Callaway's script was published in an edited "young adult" format, leaving in all descriptions of violence but omitting the harsher language. Filming took place in Mexico and California. I Still Know What You Did Last Summer was released to negative reviews, but was a box office success, grossing $84 million worldwide. On August 15, 2006, Columbia Pictures released I'll Always Know What You Did Last Summer as a straight-to-video sequel to the film which features no returning cast members. The film was released on Blu-Ray on July 14, 2009.

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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