Question:

Did Georgia state play Alabama in football today?

Answer:

Nov. 20, 2010 at Bryant-Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama Alabama will play Georgia State.

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Bryant-Denny Stadium

Bryant–Denny Stadium, located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is the home stadium for the University of Alabama football team. The stadium opened in 1929 and was originally named Denny Stadium in honor of former University of Alabama president George H. Denny. The stadium's name was amended to Bryant–Denny Stadium in 1975 after the Alabama legislature chose to honor famed Alabama coach Paul "Bear" Bryant. It has a seating capacity of 101,821, and is the second largest stadium in the SEC, the fifth largest stadium in the United States and the eighth largest non-racing stadium by seating in the world.

Georgia Alabama
Tuscaloosa metropolitan area

The Tuscaloosa metropolitan area, as defined by the United States Census Bureau, is an area consisting of three counties in west central Alabama, anchored by the city of Tuscaloosa. As of the 2010 census, the MSA had a population of 219,461 (though the July 1, 2011 Census estimate placed the population at 221,553).

As of the census of 2000, there were 192,034 people, 74,863 households, and 48,931 families residing within the MSA. The racial makeup of the MSA was 63.05% White, 34.61% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.81% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.22% of the population.


Tuscaloosa, Alabama

Tuscaloosa (/tʌskəˈlsə/ TUSK-ə-LOO-sə) is a city in and the seat of Tuscaloosa County in west central Alabama (in the southeastern United States). Located on the Black Warrior River, it is the fifth-largest city in Alabama, with an estimated population of 93,357 in 2012. Founded in 1819, the city was named after Tuskaloosa, the chieftain of a Muskogean-speaking people who battled and was defeated by Hernando de Soto in 1540 in the Battle of Mabila, and served as Alabama's capital city from 1826 to 1846.

Tuscaloosa is the regional center of industry, commerce, healthcare, and education for the area of west-central Alabama known as West Alabama. It is the principal city of the Tuscaloosa Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes Tuscaloosa, Hale and Pickens counties and has an estimated metro population in 2012 of 233,389. Tuscaloosa is also the home of the University of Alabama, Stillman College and Shelton State Community College. While the city attracted international attention when Mercedes-Benz announced it would build its first automotive assembly plant in North America in Tuscaloosa County, the University of Alabama remains the dominant economic and cultural engine in the city.

Bryant–Denny Stadium, located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, is the home stadium for the University of Alabama football team. The stadium opened in 1929 and was originally named Denny Stadium in honor of former University of Alabama president George H. Denny. The stadium's name was amended to Bryant–Denny Stadium in 1975 after the Alabama legislature chose to honor famed Alabama coach Paul "Bear" Bryant. It has a seating capacity of 101,821, and is the second largest stadium in the SEC, the fifth largest stadium in the United States and the eighth largest non-racing stadium by seating in the world.

Alabama


Xen Scott's spectacular success with the 1919 Tide carried over as Alabama set a record for the second consecutive year for most victories in a season. Bama didn't give up a single point in its first six games. In the opener against Southern Military, Alabama didn't allow a single first down. In the seventh game Alabama finally let an opponent score, but gutted out a 14–7 win over Vanderbilt in which the Commodores threw an interception on 4th and goal at the Alabama 3 in the fourth quarter. However, two games later against Georgia, Alabama's school-record 11-game winning streak was snapped. The Bulldogs did not score a single point on offense but won a bizarre 21–14 victory by scoring three touchdowns on a fumble return, a blocked punt return, and a blocked field goal return. Alabama rallied from that disappointment to win its last two games and finish 10–1 for the season. Starting with Xen Scott every Alabama coach has won 10 games in a season at least once, with the exception of the disastrous tenure of J.B. Whitworth (Mike Price was fired before ever coaching a game and Joe Kines served as interim coach for one game).


Alabama Crimson Tide football team

Crimson and White

The Alabama Crimson Tide football team represents the University of Alabama (variously Alabama, UA, or 'Bama) in the sport of American football. The Crimson Tide competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The Crimson Tide is among the most storied and decorated programs in NCAA history. Since beginning play in 1892, the program recognizes 15 of the national championships awarded to the team, including 10 wire-service (AP or Coaches) national titles in the poll-era, the most of any current FBS program. From 1958 to 1982, the team was led by Hall of Fame coach Paul "Bear" Bryant, who won six national championships with the program. Despite numerous national and conference championships, it was not until 2009 that an Alabama player received a Heisman Trophy, when running back Mark Ingram became the university's first winner.

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College football

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.


Geography of Alabama

This article will go through a wide range of topics of the geography of the state of Alabama. It is 30th in size and borders four U.S. states: Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia, and Florida. It also borders the Gulf of Mexico.

Extending entirely across the state of Alabama for about 20 miles (32 km) northern boundary, and in the middle stretching 60 miles (97 km) farther south, is the Cumberland Plateau, or Tennessee Valley region, broken into broad tablelands by the dissection of rivers. In the northern part of this plateau, west of Jackson county, there are about 1,000 square miles (2,600 km2) of level highlands from 700 to 800 feet (210 to 240 m) above sea level. South of these highlands, occupying a narrow strip on each side of the Tennessee River, is a country of gentle rolling lowlands varying in elevation from 500 to 800 feet (150 to 240 m). To the northeast of these highlands and lowlands is a rugged section with steep mountain-sides, deep narrow coves and valleys, and flat mountain-tops. Its elevations range from 400 to 1,800 feet (120 to 550 m). In the remainder of this region, the southern portion, the most prominent feature is Little Mountain, extending about 80 miles (129 km) from east to west between two valleys, and rising precipitously on the north side 500 feet (150 m) above them or 1,000 feet (300 m) above the sea.

American football (known as football in the United States and gridiron in some other countries) is a sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field 120 yards long by 53.33 yards wide with goalposts at each end. The offense attempts to advance an oval ball (the football) down the field by running with or passing it. They must advance it at least ten yards in four downs to receive a new set of four downs and continue the drive; if not, they turn over the football to the opposing team. Points are scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown, kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal or by the defense tackling the ball carrier in the offense's end zone for a safety. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

American football evolved in the United States, originating from the sport of rugby football. The first game of American football was played on November 6, 1869 between two college teams, Rutgers and Princeton, under rules resembling rugby and soccer. A set of rule changes drawn up from 1880 onward by Walter Camp, the "Father of American Football", established the snap, eleven-player teams and the concept of downs, and later rule changes legalized the forward pass, created the neutral zone and specified the size and shape of the football.

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