Question:

Can you name a dominant chord for C major? A, F, G, D?

Answer:

The scale degrees are 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 and the C major scale pitches are C D E F G A B C, in direct relationship to the scale degrees 1=C, 2=D, 3=E and so forth. AnswerParty at ya!!!

More Info:

chord
scale degrees

In music theory, a scale degree is the name given to a particular note of a scale to specify its position relative to the tonic (the main note of the scale). The tonic is considered to be the first degree of the scale, from which each octave is assumed to begin.

Any musical scale may be thought to have degrees. However, the notion of scale degree is most commonly applied to scales in which a tonic is specified by definition, such as the 7-tone diatonic scales (e.g. the C-major scale C–D–E–F–G–A–B, in which C is the tonic). As for the 12-tone chromatic scale, the selection of a first degree is possible in theory, but arbitrary and not meaningful, because typically all the notes of a chromatic scale have the same importance.

In music theory, a scale degree is the name given to a particular note of a scale to specify its position relative to the tonic (the main note of the scale). The tonic is considered to be the first degree of the scale, from which each octave is assumed to begin.

Any musical scale may be thought to have degrees. However, the notion of scale degree is most commonly applied to scales in which a tonic is specified by definition, such as the 7-tone diatonic scales (e.g. the C-major scale C–D–E–F–G–A–B, in which C is the tonic). As for the 12-tone chromatic scale, the selection of a first degree is possible in theory, but arbitrary and not meaningful, because typically all the notes of a chromatic scale have the same importance.

Music Harmony
Seventh chords

A seventh chord is a chord consisting of a triad plus a note forming an interval of a seventh above the chord's root. When not otherwise specified, a "seventh chord" usually means a dominant seventh chord: a major triad together with a minor seventh. However, a variety of sevenths may be added to a variety of triads, resulting in many different types of seventh chords, as described below.

In its earliest usage, the seventh was introduced solely as an embellishing or nonchord tone. The seventh destabilized the triad, and allowed the composer to emphasize movement in a given direction. As time passed and the collective ear of the western world became more accustomed to dissonance, the seventh was allowed to become a part of the chord itself, and in some modern music, and jazz in particular, nearly every chord is a seventh chord. Additionally, the general acceptance of equal temperament during the 19th century reduced the dissonance of some earlier forms of sevenths.

Chords
Musical scales

In music, a scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. A scale ordered by increasing pitch is an ascending scale, while descending scales are ordered by decreasing pitch. Some scales contain different pitches when ascending than when descending (for instance, see Chromatic scale and Melodic minor scale).

Often, especially in the context of the common practice period, part or all of a musical work including melody and/or harmony, is built using the notes of a single scale, which can be conveniently represented on a staff with a standard key signature.


Post-tonal music theory

Post-tonal music theory is the set of theories put forward to describe music written outside of, or 'after', the tonal system of the common practice period.

Dominant
Major and minor

In Western music, the adjectives major and minor can describe a musical composition, movement, section, scale, key, chord, or interval.

Major and minor are frequently referred to in the titles of classical compositions, especially in reference to the key of a piece.


Dominant seventh flat five chord

In music theory, the dominant seventh flat five chord is a seventh chord composed of a root note, together with a major third, a diminished fifth and a minor seventh from root (1, 3, 5 and 7). For example, the dominant seventh flat five built upon C (C75) would be C-E-G-B. It can be represented by the integer notation {0, 4, 6, 10}. In diatonic harmony, the dominant seventh flat five chord does not naturally occur on any scale degree (as does, for example, the dominant seventh on the fifth scale degree: C7 in F major).

Jazz musicians typically consider the dominant seventh flat five chord to be associated with or built from the seventh mode of the major scale, the Locrian mode. See: chord-scale system and dominant (music).


Minor major seventh chord

A minor major seventh chord, or minor/major seventh chord About this sound play  (written as mM7, mΔ7, -Δ7, mM7, m/M7, m(M7), minmaj7, m⑦,m7)(, etc.), is a naturally occurring diatonic nondominant seventh chord in the harmonic minor scale. The chord is built on a root, and above that the intervals of a minor third, a major third above that note and above that a major third (see infobox). It can also be viewed as taking a minor triad and adding a major seventh. The traditional numerical notation is based on the degrees of the major diatonic scale, and by this notation a minor major seventh chord is degrees 1, 3, 5, 7 of the major scale. For instance, the CmM7 chord consists of the notes C, E, G, and B. The chord can be represented by the integer notation {0, 3, 7, 11}.

The chord occurs on the tonic when harmonizing the harmonic minor scale in seventh chords. The harmonic minor scale contains a raised seventh, creating a minor second interval between the seventh and the octave of the tonic. This half step creates a pull (leading tone) to the tonic that is useful in harmonic context and is not present in the natural minor scale (also known as the Aeolian mode). Traditionally, in classical and jazz contexts, when building a chord on the dominant of the minor tonality, this raised seventh is present, and so both of these chords have a strong pull to the tonic. The raised seventh, in conjunction with the minor third, creates the dissonant sonority of an augmented triad within the chord.

Weather
Human Interest

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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