Question:

Can i use evaporated milk instead of sweetened condensed in a fudge recipe?

Answer:

Sweetened condensed milk contains a very large amount of sugar and cannot be substituted for evaporated milk. You can use 1 cup light cream or half and half for 1 cup evaporated milk. Happy cooking! AnswerParty!

More Info:

Evaporated milk, also known as dehydrated milk, is a shelf-stable canned milk product with about 60% of the water removed from fresh milk. It differs from sweetened condensed milk, which contains added sugar. Sweetened condensed milk requires less processing since the added sugar inhibits bacterial growth.

The product takes up half the space of its nutritional equivalent in fresh milk. When the liquid product is mixed with a proportionate amount of water, evaporated milk becomes the rough equivalent of fresh milk. This makes evaporated milk attractive for shipping purposes as it can have a shelf life of months or even years, depending upon the fat and sugar content. This made evaporated milk very popular before refrigeration as a safe and reliable substitute for perishable fresh milk, which could be shipped easily to locations lacking the means of safe milk production or storage. Households in the western world use it most often today for desserts and baking due to its unique flavor. It is also used as a substitute for pouring cream, as an accompaniment to desserts, or (undiluted) as a rich substitute for milk. Mashed potatoes can be made by adding evaporated milk to (typically peeled) boiled potatoes, and whipping them into a creamy food.

Food is any substance consumed to provide nutritional support for the body. It is usually of plant or animal origin, and contains essential nutrients, such as carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, or minerals. The substance is ingested by an organism and assimilated by the organism's cells in an effort to produce energy, maintain life, or stimulate growth.

Historically, people secured food through two methods: hunting and gathering, and agriculture. Today, most of the food energy consumed by the world population is supplied by the food industry.

Milk

Condensed Milk is cow's milk from which water has been removed. It is most often found in the form of sweetened condensed milk, with sugar added, and the two terms 'condensed milk' and 'sweetened condensed milk' are often used synonymously today. Sweetened condensed milk is a very thick, sweet product which when canned can last for years without refrigeration if unopened. Though there have been unsweetened condensed milk products, they spoiled far more easily and are uncommon nowadays. Condensed milk is used in numerous dessert dishes in many countries.

A related product is evaporated milk, which has undergone a more complex process and which is not sweetened.

Fudge

Singaporean cuisine is indicative of the ethnic diversity of the culture of Singapore which originated from Malaysia, as a product of centuries of cultural interaction owing to Singapore's strategic location. The food is influenced by the native Malay, the predominant Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Peranakan, and Western traditions (particularly English and some Portuguese-influenced Eurasian, known as Kristang) since the founding of Singapore by the British in the nineteenth century. Influences from other areas such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, Philippines, and the Middle East exist in local food culture as well. In Singaporean hawker stalls, for example, chefs of Chinese background influenced by Indian culture might experiment with condiments and ingredients such as tamarind, turmeric, and ghee, while an Indian chef might serve a fried noodle dish. With a variety of influences from different countries, it is suffice to note that the globalization phenomenon affects the cuisine in Singapore as well.

This globalization phenomenon on the cuisine of Singapore proves to be a significant cultural attraction. Most prepared food is eaten outside the home at hawker centres or food courts, examples of which include Lau Pa Sat and Newton Food Centre, rather than at restaurants. This is because such Singaporean hawker stalls include a huge variety of cuisines, ranging from Malay food, to Thai, Indian, Western, Korean, Japanese and even Vietnamese food. These hawker centres are abundant and cheap, hence encouraging a large consumer base.

Thai tea (also known as Thai iced tea) or "cha-yen" (Thai: ชาเย็น, lit. "cold tea") in Thailand, is a drink made from strongly-brewed ceylon tea. However, due to ceylon tea's high price, plain black tea with added food coloring is commonly used. Other ingredients may include added orange blossom water, star anise, crushed tamarind seed or red and yellow food coloring, and sometimes other spices as well. This tea is sweetened with sugar and condensed milk and served chilled. Evaporated milk, coconut milk or whole milk is generally poured over the tea and ice before serving to add taste and creamy appearance. However, in Thailand, condensed milk and sugar are mixed with the tea before it is poured over ice and then topped with evaporated milk. In Thai restaurants worldwide, it is served in a tall glass, though when sold from street and market stalls in Thailand it is more typically poured over the crushed ice in a clear (or translucent) plastic bag or tall plastic cups. At markets, it can be seen to be mixed through pouring the tea at heights of about 4 feet back and forth. It can also be made into a frappé at more Westernised vendors.]citation needed[

It is popular in Southeast Asia and in many American restaurants that serve Thai food. Although Thai tea is not the same as bubble tea, a Southeast and East Asian beverage that contains large tapioca pearls, Thai tea with tapioca pearls is a popular flavor of bubble tea.]citation needed[

Other Hospitality Recreation
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
30