Question:

Are 2 dollar bills still made?

Answer:

The $2 bill is printed less frequently than other denominations still in production which are: $1, $2, 5$, $10, $20, $50 and $100.

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Economy of the United States

farming, forestry, and fishing: 0.7% manufacturing, extraction, transportation, and crafts: 20% managerial, professional, and technical]disambiguation needed[: 37% sales and office: 24% other services: 18% (2009)

Main data source: CIA World Fact Book

Currency
Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson (April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776) and the third President of the United States (1801–1809). He was a spokesman for democracy and the rights of man with worldwide influence. At the beginning of the American Revolution, he served in the Continental Congress, representing Virginia and then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779–1781). Just after the war ended, from mid-1784 Jefferson served as a diplomat, stationed in Paris. In May 1785, he became the United States Minister to France.

Jefferson was the first United States Secretary of State (1790–1793) serving under President George Washington. With his close friend James Madison he organized the Democratic-Republican Party, and subsequently resigned from Washington's cabinet. Elected Vice President in 1796, when he came in second to President John Adams of the Federalists, Jefferson opposed Adams and with Madison secretly wrote the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, which attempted to nullify the Alien and Sedition Acts.


United States Declaration of Independence

The Declaration of Independence is a statement adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, which announced that the thirteen American colonies, then at war with Great Britain, regarded themselves as independent states, and no longer a part of the British Empire. Instead they formed a union that would become a new nation—the United States of America. John Adams was a leader in pushing for independence, which was unanimously approved on July 2. A committee had already drafted the formal declaration, to be ready when Congress voted on independence.

Adams persuaded the committee to select Thomas Jefferson to compose the original draft of the document, which congress would edit to produce the final version. The Declaration was ultimately a formal explanation of why Congress had voted on July 2 to declare independence from Great Britain, more than a year after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. The national birthday, the Independence Day is celebrated on July 4, although Adams wanted July 2.


United States two-dollar bill

The United States two-dollar bill ($2) is a current denomination of U.S. currency. The third U.S. President (1801–09), Thomas Jefferson is featured on the obverse of the note. The reverse features an engraved modified reproduction of the painting The Declaration of Independence by John Trumbull.

The bill was discontinued in 1966 but was reintroduced 10 years later as a potential cost-saving measure. Today, it is seldom seen in circulation, and as a result, the production of the note is the lowest of U.S. banknotes: fewer than 1% of all notes currently produced are $2 bills. This comparative scarcity in circulation, coupled with a lack of public awareness that the bill is still in circulation, has also inspired urban legends and occasionally has created problems for people trying to use the bill to make purchases.

Dollar coin Bill
Large denominations of United States currency

The base currency of the United States is the U.S. dollar, and is printed on bills in seven denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. U.S. currency previously included five larger denominations. Notes in the denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 were printed for general use; a $100,000 note was printed for certain internal transactions.

Bank Notes that are no longer in issue in Canada, and are being actively removed from circulation, are said to be withdrawn from circulation. Notes that have been withdrawn from circulation include:

Only five different banknotes are currently issued ($5, $10, $20, $50 and $100). Smaller denominations have been replaced by coins, and larger ones are felt to be no longer required in an era of electronic transmission of most large transactions. Although currency withdrawn from circulation remains legal tender, it is disposed of by the Bank of Canada when returned to them. Withdrawn currency is usually exchanged at commercial bank branches, though some banks require that exchangers be bank customers, and then the bank presents the withdrawn currency to the Bank of Canada together with worn-out currency in the normal course of business.

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