Question:

A fifth of alcohol is equal to how many pints of alcohol?

Answer:

A fifth means a fifth of a gallon and there are about about 1 1/3 pints.

More Info:

United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States. The U.S. customary system developed from English units which were in use in the British Empire before American independence. Consequently most U.S. units are virtually identical to the British imperial units. However, the British system was overhauled in 1824, changing the definitions of some units used there, so several differences exist between the two systems.

The majority of U.S. customary units were redefined in terms of the meter and the kilogram with the Mendenhall Order of 1893, and in practice, for many years before. These definitions were refined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959. The U.S. primarily uses customary units in its commercial activities, while science, medicine, government, and many sectors of industry use metric units. The SI metric system, or International System of Units is preferred for many uses by NIST

Pint Gallon Joug

An alcoholic beverage is a drink that contains ethanol. Alcoholic beverages are divided into three general classes for taxation and regulation of production: beers, wines, and spirits (distilled beverages). They are legally consumed in most countries around the world. More than 100 countries have laws regulating their production, sale, and consumption. Beer is the third most popular drink in the world, after water and tea.

Alcoholic beverages have been consumed by humans since the Neolithic era; the earliest evidence of alcohol was discovered in Jiahu, dating from 7000–6600 BC. The production and consumption of alcohol occurs in most cultures of the world, from hunter-gatherer peoples to nation-states.

Fifth

Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps is a British comedy television series sitcom that ran from 26 February 2001 to 24 May 2011 and starring Sheridan Smith, Will Mellor, Ralf Little, Natalie Casey, Kathryn Drysdale and Luke Gell. Created and written by Susan Nickson, it is set in the town of Runcorn in Cheshire, England, and originally revolves around the lives of five twenty-somethings. In September 2007 Little confirmed in an interview on This Morning that he had left the series. The seventh series aired following a two year hiatus in 2008 with Little's character being killed off in the first episode. Smith and Drysdale did not return for the ninth and final series with their departures being mentioned briefly in the first episode, Freddie Hogan and Georgia Henshaw were brought in as their replacements making Mellor and Casey the only original characters left in the series. Writer & Creator, Susan Nickson also left before the ninth series.

The core cast have been augmented by various recurring characters throughout the series, including Beverly Callard, Lee Oakes, Hayley Bishop, Alison Mac, Thomas Nelstrop and Jonathon Dutton. The show was first broadcast in 2001 on BBC Two. The title was inspired by the 1980 hit single "Two Pints of Lager and a Packet of Crisps Please" by Splodgenessabounds.

In recipes, quantities of ingredients may be specified by mass (commonly called weight), by volume, or by count.

For most of history, most cookbooks did not specify quantities precisely, instead talking of "a nice leg of spring lamb", a "cupful" of lentils, a piece of butter "the size of a walnut", and "sufficient" salt. Informal measurements such as a "pinch", a "drop", or a "hint" (soupçon) continue to be used from time to time. In the US, Fannie Farmer introduced the more exact specification of quantities by volume in her 1896 Boston Cooking-School Cook Book.

Measurement

The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, but some Imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Scotland had a distinct system of measures and weights until at least the late 18th century, based on the ell as a unit of length, the stone as a unit of mass and the boll and the firlot as units of dry measure. This official system coexisted with local variants, especially for the measurement of land.

The system is said to have been introduced by David I of Scotland (1124–53), although there are no surviving records until the 15th century when the system was already in normal use. Standard measures and weights were kept in each burgh, and these were periodically compared against one another at "assizes of measures", often during the early years of the reign of a new monarch. Nevertheless, there was considerable local variation in many of the units, and the units of dry measure steadily increased in size from 1400 to 1700.

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